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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Morone, James "). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Mastrangelo, James Elliot Ficker. City of gods: the rationalization of spiritual thought in America and the erosion of the foundations of democratic liberalism.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2009, Rutgers University

This project focuses on the potential for American liberalism to enable the undermining of its own political foundations. Further, this project investigates the role that different approaches to knowledge, religious and otherwise, play in the formation of political knowledge that may exploit this instability in the American democratic project. Many Americans assume a salutary influence on the part of religion on American political life. I argue that the assumption of this benefit without regard to religion's specific effect on political knowledge formation may exacerbate the ability of various sorts of belief to destabilize political democracy in America. Insofar as that is the case, an ironic tension develops in the American system of liberalism whereby the liberty enacted by American politics enables and may even encourage the development of approaches to political knowledge that eats away at the political premises upon which the liberty that allowed the development of said beliefs was in the first place premised. To conclude, I consider what lessons this insight holds for our beliefs, for liberty, and if the insight does not itself suggest an appropriate approach to political democracy. To this end, I first develop an understanding of Locke's theory of liberalism and the role for religion therein. Next, I explain how the liberal political system of the American founding deviates from Locke's theorized system and what potential that holds for the role of religion in an historical developmental context. To further such an investigation, I look at the operation of American democracy and the function of religion as observed and theorized by Tocqueville, and then consider the subsequent theological developments in mainline American Protestantism growing out of the Second Great Awakening. By looking at the social Darwinists and the Social Gospel movement, I then illustrate how new epistemological developments in American thought, as manifested by the cross-pollination and melding of scientific rationality and normative spiritual thinking, come to validate a new ontological conception of the individual's relationship to society. Finally, I consider the ramifications of the acceptability in American public discourse of a rationally individuated spiritual approach to the world for democratic politics.

Advisors/Committee Members: Mastrangelo, James Elliot Ficker (author), Tichenor, Daniel (chair), Schochet, Gordon (internal member), Bathory, Dennis (internal member), Murphy, Andrew (internal member), Morone, James (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Liberalism – United States; Democracy – Religious aspects; Religion and politics – United States

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mastrangelo, J. E. F. (2009). City of gods: the rationalization of spiritual thought in America and the erosion of the foundations of democratic liberalism. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051046

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mastrangelo, James Elliot Ficker. “City of gods: the rationalization of spiritual thought in America and the erosion of the foundations of democratic liberalism.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed August 03, 2020. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051046.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mastrangelo, James Elliot Ficker. “City of gods: the rationalization of spiritual thought in America and the erosion of the foundations of democratic liberalism.” 2009. Web. 03 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Mastrangelo JEF. City of gods: the rationalization of spiritual thought in America and the erosion of the foundations of democratic liberalism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2009. [cited 2020 Aug 03]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051046.

Council of Science Editors:

Mastrangelo JEF. City of gods: the rationalization of spiritual thought in America and the erosion of the foundations of democratic liberalism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051046


Rutgers University

2. Stipelman, Brian Eric. Necessitous men are not free men: the political theory of the New Deal.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2008, Rutgers University

Little attention has been paid to the political theory that informs the New Deal, despite the impressive amount of research devoted to the period. This is of particular importance since the alleged lack of theory means there is little philosophic justification for the American welfare state on its own terms. This dissertation synthesizes a political theory of the New Deal from the writings of Franklin Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Henry Wallace, and Thurman Arnold. The theory highlights the need for the public accountability of private economic power, arguing that when the private economic realm is unable to adequately guarantee the rights of citizens the state must intervene to protect those rights. The New Deal created a new American social contract that accorded our right to the pursuit of happiness a status equal to liberty, and ground both in an expansive idea of security (with physical, material, and psychic components) as the necessary precondition for the exercise of either. This was connected to a theory of the common good that privileged the consumer as the central category while simultaneously working to limit the worst excesses of consumption-oriented individualism. This theory of ends was supplemented by a theory of practice that focused on ways to institutionalize progressive politics in a conservative institutional context. It focuses in particular on Thurman Arnold’s theory of symbolic politics. Arnold argues that any progressive change must be grounded in the ‘folklore’ of the institutions it wishes to supplant. This project has two further goals. The first argues that political theory needs to greater focus on the moment of political engagement. Unless a theory is integrated into a political context that focuses on the restraints upon and possibilities of agency facing the relevant actors the theory is engaged primarily in moral critique. Finally, it argues that contemporary progressives should appropriate the theory of the New Deal to use as the theoretical framework for arguments seeking to defend and expand the American welfare state.

Advisors/Committee Members: Stipelman, Brian Eric (author), Tichenor, Daniel (chair), Bronner, Stephen (internal member), Bathory, Dennis (internal member), Morone, James (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: New Deal, 1933-1939; United States – Politics and government – 1933-1945

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stipelman, B. E. (2008). Necessitous men are not free men: the political theory of the New Deal. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17092

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stipelman, Brian Eric. “Necessitous men are not free men: the political theory of the New Deal.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed August 03, 2020. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17092.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stipelman, Brian Eric. “Necessitous men are not free men: the political theory of the New Deal.” 2008. Web. 03 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Stipelman BE. Necessitous men are not free men: the political theory of the New Deal. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2008. [cited 2020 Aug 03]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17092.

Council of Science Editors:

Stipelman BE. Necessitous men are not free men: the political theory of the New Deal. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17092

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