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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Kulikowski, Casimir A"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Khan, Faisal M., 1981-. Semi-supervised transductive regression for survival analysis in medical prognostics.

Degree: PhD, Computer Science, 2016, Rutgers University

The central challenge in predictive modeling for survival analysis in medical prognostics is the management of censored observations in the data. While time-to-event predictions can be modeled as regression problems, traditional regression techniques are challenged by the censored characteristics of the data. In such problems the true target times of a majority of instances are unknown; what is known is a censored target representing some indeterminate time before the true target time. The information for most patients is incomplete and only known “up-to-a-point.” Patients who have experienced the endpoint of interest (cancer recurrence, death, etc) during an often multi-year study are considered as non-censored or events. They may represent as little as 9% of the available sample. Most of the patients do not experience the endpoint or are lost to follow-up for various reasons (patient moved, died of other causes, etc.). These censored samples often represent most of the available sample. Modeling techniques which can correctly account for censored observations are crucial. Such censored samples can be considered as semi-supervised targets, however most efforts in semi-supervised regression do not take into account the partial nature of unsupervised information; with samples treated as either fully labelled or unlabeled. This dissertation presents a novel transduction approach for semi-supervised survival analysis. The true target times are approximated from the censored times through transduction to improve predictive performance. The framework can be employed to transform traditional regression methods for survival analysis, or to enhance existing survival analysis algorithms for improved predictive performance. This proposed approach represents one of the first applications of semi-supervised regression to survival analysis and yields significant improvements in predictive performance for multiple applications in prostate and breast cancer prognostics.

Advisors/Committee Members: Kulikowski, Casimir A (chair), Chen, Kevin (internal member), Michmizos, Konstantinos (internal member), Mitsis, Georgios (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Survival analysis (Biometry)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Khan, Faisal M., 1. (2016). Semi-supervised transductive regression for survival analysis in medical prognostics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/51331/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Khan, Faisal M., 1981-. “Semi-supervised transductive regression for survival analysis in medical prognostics.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed December 01, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/51331/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Khan, Faisal M., 1981-. “Semi-supervised transductive regression for survival analysis in medical prognostics.” 2016. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Khan, Faisal M. 1. Semi-supervised transductive regression for survival analysis in medical prognostics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/51331/.

Council of Science Editors:

Khan, Faisal M. 1. Semi-supervised transductive regression for survival analysis in medical prognostics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2016. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/51331/

2. Liu, Baiyang, 1983-. Selection-based dictionary learning for sparse representation in visual tracking.

Degree: Computer Science, 2012, Rutgers University

Subjects/Keywords: Computer vision

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, Baiyang, 1. (2012). Selection-based dictionary learning for sparse representation in visual tracking. (Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000066893

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Baiyang, 1983-. “Selection-based dictionary learning for sparse representation in visual tracking.” 2012. Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed December 01, 2020. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000066893.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Baiyang, 1983-. “Selection-based dictionary learning for sparse representation in visual tracking.” 2012. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Liu, Baiyang 1. Selection-based dictionary learning for sparse representation in visual tracking. [Internet] [Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2012. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000066893.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Liu, Baiyang 1. Selection-based dictionary learning for sparse representation in visual tracking. [Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000066893

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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