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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Kirk, Kathleen"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Anyika, Chinwe, 1975-. Modeling and analysis of a clinical documentation improvement system: calculatiing patient outcomes.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Informatics, 2015, Rutgers University

Over the past decade, clinical documentation improvement (CDI) programs have undergone quite an evolution and continue to evolve even today, particularly as the implementation of the new International Classification of Diseases, version 10 (ICD-10) system draws near. Before the Prospective Payment System (PPS) was established, Physicians focused on taking care of their patients without concerning themselves about quality or detailed documentation. They were reimbursed by Insurance companies without in-depth enquiries about services provided. With the introduction of the PPS, quality of patient care, length of stay during admission, severity of illness, and risk of mortality, became important benchmarks. CDI software models became more and more necessary as more hospitals adopted CDI programs to assist in improving Physician documentation in the patient’s medical record. This study first describes the need for a comprehensive electronic CDI model. Secondly, descriptive statistics will be used to determine the relevance of the different metrics collected as data in the new CDI model. Then, analysis of the collected data will be performed using the MS-DRG severity level and APR-DRG severity level to show the effects and contributions of a functional CDI program in relation to a hospital’s reported and coded statistics. Consequently, results of descriptive statistics show that between 19 to 32.5 percent of queries were generated monthly as a result of inadequate documentation by Physicians in patients’ medical records in relation to the total number of records reviewed and entered in the CDI software by the CDI Specialists. Other results of analyses show that a good CDI program significantly and positively impacts on different hospital metrics like the accuracy of coded data, case mix index (CMI), length of stay (LOS), severity of illness (SOI), risk of mortality (ROM), and reimbursement. In conclusion, the results of this study reveal that a significant positive ripple effect is achieved when an efficient CDI program is implemented, and this notion should serve as a basis to obtain a comprehensive CDI model where data collection can be better utilized to positively impact patient outcomes.

Advisors/Committee Members: Srinivasan, Shankar (chair), Coffman, Frederick (internal member), Kirk, Kathleen (internal member), School of Health Related Professions.

Subjects/Keywords: Medical records; Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

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APA (6th Edition):

Anyika, Chinwe, 1. (2015). Modeling and analysis of a clinical documentation improvement system: calculatiing patient outcomes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/48232/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Anyika, Chinwe, 1975-. “Modeling and analysis of a clinical documentation improvement system: calculatiing patient outcomes.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/48232/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Anyika, Chinwe, 1975-. “Modeling and analysis of a clinical documentation improvement system: calculatiing patient outcomes.” 2015. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Anyika, Chinwe 1. Modeling and analysis of a clinical documentation improvement system: calculatiing patient outcomes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/48232/.

Council of Science Editors:

Anyika, Chinwe 1. Modeling and analysis of a clinical documentation improvement system: calculatiing patient outcomes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/48232/


Rutgers University

2. Joseph, Jean Marc, 1972-. A correlational study between hospital patient safety culture and computer self-efficacy among nurses in a hospital setting.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Informatics, 2015, Rutgers University

A largely aging population, increase in chronic diseases, and rising costs are leading to the requirement for worldwide healthcare reform (Wilson, Whitaker, & Whitford, 2012). Wilson, Whitaker, and Whitford (2012) resolved, "To meet these needs, nurses are being encouraged to practice to the full extent of their skills and take significant leadership roles in health policy, planning, and provisions" (Wilson et al., 2012). "Nurses are frequently restricted in their scope of practice even as they comprise the largest group of health professionals" (Wilson et al., 2012). Wilson et al. asserted, "Nurses can help improve health services in a cost effective way, but to do so, they must be seen as equal partners in health service provision" (2012). The purpose of this study is to examine if there is a correlation between the level of computer skills among nurses working in a hospital setting and the patient safety culture of the hospital in order to promote successful electronic medical record in the nursing practice. The methodology for this study is a questionnaire design that will be used to survey hospital patient safety culture and nurses’ views using computer self-efficacy systems in a hospital setting. This data collection and the presentation of the necessary findings and results will provide key insights for the evaluation of this research management. All statistical analyses will be performed using SPSS for Windows (IBM SPSS 19.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). All of the analyses will be two-sided with a 5% alpha level. Demographic characteristics of the study sample will be described using the mean, standard deviation, and range for continuous scaled variables, and frequency and percent for categorical scaled variables. Cronbach’s alpha will be used to measure the internal consistency reliability of the computer self-efficacy, teamwork within hospital units aspect of patient safety culture, hospital management support for patient safety aspect of patient safety culture, communication openness aspect of patient safety culture, and feedback and communication about errors aspects of the patient safety culture scale scores.

Advisors/Committee Members: Srinivasan, Shankar (chair), Coffman, Frederick (co-chair), Kirk, Kathleen (co-chair), School of Health Related Professions.

Subjects/Keywords: Hospitals – Safety measures; Patients – Safety measures; Nursing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Joseph, Jean Marc, 1. (2015). A correlational study between hospital patient safety culture and computer self-efficacy among nurses in a hospital setting. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/48234/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Joseph, Jean Marc, 1972-. “A correlational study between hospital patient safety culture and computer self-efficacy among nurses in a hospital setting.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/48234/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Joseph, Jean Marc, 1972-. “A correlational study between hospital patient safety culture and computer self-efficacy among nurses in a hospital setting.” 2015. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Joseph, Jean Marc 1. A correlational study between hospital patient safety culture and computer self-efficacy among nurses in a hospital setting. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/48234/.

Council of Science Editors:

Joseph, Jean Marc 1. A correlational study between hospital patient safety culture and computer self-efficacy among nurses in a hospital setting. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/48234/


Rutgers University

3. Eldosougi, Huda, 1966-. Analysis of post-neo-natal inpatient hospitalizations in the United States.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Informatics, 2019, Rutgers University

According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the United States expenditure on health care exceeds all other developed countries with similar income and lifestyle. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) expenditure in the U.S. on health was 17.5% in 2016 or 10000 per capita compared to 10% GDP or 2781 in the EU. Yet, Europeans have longer life spans of 83 years in the EU versus 78 in the USA. Infant mortality is at 2.3 per 1000 live births in Scandinavian countries compared to 5.6 in the USA. Infant hospitalization and inpatient care affect a large proportion of the population and significantly impact the economy. Liveborn (newborn infant) was the most common reason for hospitalization in the U.S. from 1997-2010, accounting for more than 3.9 million stays in 2010 (10 percent of all stays). The highest hospitalization rate by age group in the country is for infants less than one year old.31 Among hospitalized adults ages 18–44, 4 of the top 5 conditions are related to pregnancy and childbirth: trauma to the perineum and vulva due to childbirth, maternal stay with a previous Cesarean section, prolonged pregnancy, and hypertension complicating pregnancy and childbirth.”31 Optimal healthcare starts just before birth at prenatal care, and the first hospitalization is at birth. Part of healthcare effectiveness is in access or availability and utilization of available resources such as hospitalization. Hospital inpatient care cost is almost a third of all healthcare expenditure in the United States representing a significant impact on the economy. Healthcare equity remains a national political debate with 15% or 27.4 million non-elderly Americans still uninsured in 2017 compared to other developed countries which have almost 100% universal coverage. People at increased risk of poor health are also likely to perform specific health behaviors e.g. those without health insurance, those with fewer resources, those with less education, and low health literacy, or many who are already ill. Consequently, this further contributes to increased disparities in health outcomes. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of the National Health Interview Survey of 2017, 50% uninsured, 12 % publicly insured, and 11% privately insured had no usual source of care. Respondents said their usual source of care is the emergency room. The goal of this study is to evaluate post-neo-natal healthcare, with a focus on secondary care and social determinants as some of the factors involved in healthcare inequities for socioeconomically disadvantaged families. The objective is to investigate hospitalization for infants and some of the demographics affecting inpatients in order to identify high risk populations and improve medical outcomes in post-neo-natal health. The hypothesis is to determine whether primary diagnoses, length of stay, hospital outcomes or patient disposition, and total charges of post-neo-natal admissions differ with race, income bracket, insurance type, or geographic regions in the United States. A… Advisors/Committee Members: Srinivasan, Shankar (chair), Coffman, Frederick (co-chair), Kirk, Kathleen M. (internal member), School of Health Professions.

Subjects/Keywords: Medical care, Cost of  – Social aspects; Newborn infants  – Hospital care

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Eldosougi, Huda, 1. (2019). Analysis of post-neo-natal inpatient hospitalizations in the United States. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60606/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eldosougi, Huda, 1966-. “Analysis of post-neo-natal inpatient hospitalizations in the United States.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60606/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eldosougi, Huda, 1966-. “Analysis of post-neo-natal inpatient hospitalizations in the United States.” 2019. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Eldosougi, Huda 1. Analysis of post-neo-natal inpatient hospitalizations in the United States. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60606/.

Council of Science Editors:

Eldosougi, Huda 1. Analysis of post-neo-natal inpatient hospitalizations in the United States. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60606/

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