Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Johnson, Michelle Linette"). One record found.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Rutgers University

1. Johnson, Michelle Linette. Polyanhydride blends as drug delivery matrices to control biofilms, bone and nerve regeneration.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 2008, Rutgers University

Biodegradable polyanhydrides were fabricated into disks, coatings, microspheres, and tubes for controlled drug delivery as well as enhanced thermal and mechanical properties. The polymer systems were evaluated as potential treatments for periodontal disease, orthopedic injuries, nerve regeneration, and biofilm formation. The polymers contained the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), salicylic acid and the antibiotic, ampicillin, in the polymer backbone, which are subsequently released as the polymers degrade. Significantly, the polymers can be fabricated into these different geometries that would not be possible with the drug molecules alone. This dissertation characterizes the in vitro degradation of the polyanhydrides specifically for the multiple applications. Polymer degradation was monitored by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for final degradation products. The effect of physically admixing additional drugs into the polymer matrix was studied as well, where the admixed drugs were delineated from the chemically incorporated drugs by HPLC. Accelerated in vitro degradation rates were developed using highly basic media. Mechanical and thermal properties were examined for potential orthopedic and nerve applications. The compliance and modulus of polymer blends and composites were measured to characterize the flexibility and strength of each system. Additionally, properties, such as glass transition temperature (Tg) and decomposition temperature (Td) were measured to monitor polymer changes as a result of processing and degradation. Overall, the fundamental chemical, thermal and mechanical properties of each polyanhydride system were monitored. This dissertation describes the optimization of controlled drug release rates for specific applications through composites and blends of ceramics (hydroxyapatite), drugs (antimicrobials and NSAIDs), and polymers (polyanhydrides).

Advisors/Committee Members: Johnson, Michelle Linette (author), Uhrich, Kathryn (chair), Li, Jing (internal member), Taylor, John (internal member), Patwardhan, Dinesh (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Drug delivery systems

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, M. L. (2008). Polyanhydride blends as drug delivery matrices to control biofilms, bone and nerve regeneration. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17333

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Michelle Linette. “Polyanhydride blends as drug delivery matrices to control biofilms, bone and nerve regeneration.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed June 16, 2019. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17333.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Michelle Linette. “Polyanhydride blends as drug delivery matrices to control biofilms, bone and nerve regeneration.” 2008. Web. 16 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Johnson ML. Polyanhydride blends as drug delivery matrices to control biofilms, bone and nerve regeneration. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2008. [cited 2019 Jun 16]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17333.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson ML. Polyanhydride blends as drug delivery matrices to control biofilms, bone and nerve regeneration. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17333

.