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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Jivoff, Paul"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Caracappa, Joseph Charles, 1991-. Brood-dependent morphology, behavior, and biophysical interactions among blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) zoeae.

Degree: PhD, Oceanography, 2019, Rutgers University

The goal of this dissertation is to provide a better understanding of the intraspecific variability in morphology and swimming behavior, as well as some of the implications of such variation, in early stage Callinectes sapidus zoeae. A long-standing body of work has demonstrated that zoeal morphology is not constant, and morphological features can have an important role in survival and behavior. Additionally, given the presence in brood-dependent morphology in other species and the susceptibility of blue crab life history to generate maternal effects, the presence and magnitude of differences among larval broods should be addressed. In the second chapter, variation in C. sapidus zoeal morphology among several larval broods was identified, and used to test whether brood-dependent morphology is present. This experiment involved hatching several broods, making measurements using microscope photography, and image analysis. Simple models of swimming-induced drag and passive sinking velocity were used to create an index of vertical swimming efficiency. Results discussed in Chapter 2 demonstrate that morphology can vary significantly between broods, and these differences can translate to differing swimming efficiency. In the third chapter, larvae from the same broods described in Chapter 2 were followed further into development to investigate how brood-level morphological differences change over development. By the time of their second molt, broods of zoeae retain most differences in morphological size and shape, but shape difference decrease. These results suggest that over time, brood effects can persist, but there is a detectible morphological convergence, and differences in swimming efficiency are still present. Chapter four tested whether the brood-dependent morphology discussed in the prior chapters translated to similar differences in swimming behavior. Using mesocosm video observations, significant differences in the swimming velocity, orientation, and path straightness of larval broods was confirmed. Despite these differences, distinct modes of behavior that were conserved across broods were observed. These represent differences in swimming behavior within broods either between individuals or over time. In the fifth chapter, simulations were used to test whether the observed brood-dependent behavior and morphology can translate to differences in larval transport. A simplified model of a wind-driven estuarine plume with a sheared current was used, along with observed brood-depending swimming and sinking behaviors, to model larval transport. Model results showed brood-dependent and behaviorally-driven larval transport, where faster-swimming broods of larvae are more able to counter wind-driven vertical mixing and stay in surface waters. Likewise, the type of depth-regulation zoeae use can influence how they are transported. Overall, this dissertation finds that morphological and behavioral traits can differ substantially between larval broods. These results suggest that there may be differential success of larvae… Advisors/Committee Members: Munroe, Daphne (chair), Chant, Robert (internal member), Fuchs, Heidi (internal member), López-Duarte, Paola (internal member), Jivoff, Paul (outside member), School of Graduate Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Callinectes sapidus; Blue crab  – Larvae  – Morphology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Caracappa, Joseph Charles, 1. (2019). Brood-dependent morphology, behavior, and biophysical interactions among blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) zoeae. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/61703/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caracappa, Joseph Charles, 1991-. “Brood-dependent morphology, behavior, and biophysical interactions among blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) zoeae.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed May 11, 2021. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/61703/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caracappa, Joseph Charles, 1991-. “Brood-dependent morphology, behavior, and biophysical interactions among blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) zoeae.” 2019. Web. 11 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Caracappa, Joseph Charles 1. Brood-dependent morphology, behavior, and biophysical interactions among blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) zoeae. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. [cited 2021 May 11]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/61703/.

Council of Science Editors:

Caracappa, Joseph Charles 1. Brood-dependent morphology, behavior, and biophysical interactions among blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) zoeae. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/61703/

2. Reichmuth, Jessica M., 1979. Behavioral ecology and population genetics of two populations of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), in New Jersey:.

Degree: PhD, Biological Sciences, 2009, Rutgers University

Blue crabs are important estuarine organisms, both ecologically and economically. Due to historical differences of human impact between contaminated Hackensack Meadowlands (HM) and cleaner Tuckerton (TK), adult prey capture, juvenile predator avoidance, adult/juvenile aggression, metal accumulation/depuration and population genetics were investigated.HM adults had reduced prey capture on active prey compared to TK crabs, suggesting HM crabs may have reduced coordination. Stomach analysis revealed HM crabs’ stomachs contained ~60% algae/plant and detritus/sediment, and lower crab and fish weights than TK crabs. TK crabs were caged in HM or fed HM food for 8 weeks; their prey capture declined significantly indicating environmental factors were responsible for the behavioral differences. Crabs were then analyzed for metals in muscle and hepatopancreas. HM crabs were fed clean food or transplanted to TK; TK crabs were fed contaminated food or transplanted to HM. Significant tissue differences were found for Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn. HM crabs did not show a significant decrease in Hg after switching environment or diet, but showed a significant decrease in Cu, Pb and Zn in hepatopancreas after switching. TK crabs showed a significant increase of Hg in muscle and Cr and Zn in hepatopancreas after switching environment or food. In the lab, HM juveniles attacked threatening stimuli significantly more and TK juveniles fled or gave a mixed response significantly more. HM juveniles were significantly better at avoiding a crab predator when substrate was present. Follow-up experiments were conducted without substrate to determine if aggression was important. Aggressive juveniles were no more successful than non-aggressive ones at avoiding a predator. Adults were placed in a large tank with a crab pot; significantly fewer HM adults entered the pot. The first HM crab to enter generally prevented others from entering or attacked those that did, suggesting aggression may be causing low pot counts. Microsatellites were analyzed using four markers. Genotypic differences were not found among the three years which indicates these populations are not genetically distinct. Yearly differences were not found. These results indicate genetics can be ruled out. The ‘switch’ experiments results indicate the environment is causing the behavioral differences.

Advisors/Committee Members: Reichmuth, Jessica M., 1979 (author), Weis, Judith (chair), Holzapfel, Claus (internal member), Morrison, Douglas (internal member), Jivoff, Paul (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Callinectes – New Jersey – Behavior; Callinectes – New Jersey – Ecology; Callinectes – New Jersey – Genetics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reichmuth, Jessica M., 1. (2009). Behavioral ecology and population genetics of two populations of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), in New Jersey:. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051315

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reichmuth, Jessica M., 1979. “Behavioral ecology and population genetics of two populations of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), in New Jersey:.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed May 11, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051315.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reichmuth, Jessica M., 1979. “Behavioral ecology and population genetics of two populations of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), in New Jersey:.” 2009. Web. 11 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Reichmuth, Jessica M. 1. Behavioral ecology and population genetics of two populations of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), in New Jersey:. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2009. [cited 2021 May 11]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051315.

Council of Science Editors:

Reichmuth, Jessica M. 1. Behavioral ecology and population genetics of two populations of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), in New Jersey:. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051315

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