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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Blackford, Holly V"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Rotter, Kimberly Rose, 1981-. Beloved: a political composition.

Degree: MA, English, 2010, Rutgers University

The emergent term, traumatic fiction describes the extraordinary violence inflicted on individuals and groups during a traumatic twentieth-century history which encompasses two world wars, various genocides, the Great Depression, and the Cold War. Traumatic fiction narratives mirror the neurosis of traumatic experience by distorting conventional narrative structures and using literary techniques like fragmentation, textual gaps, and repetition. They critique the social, economic, and political structures which make and maintain trauma. Traumatic fiction narratives focus on the problems of amnesia and memory in the construction of the historical narrative. It questions a "true" historical narrative by focusing on traditionally suppressed voices. Toni Morrison's novel, Beloved (1987) exemplifies this genre of traumatic fiction. However, critics have confused Toni Morrison's traumatic fiction writing style with music. Critics like Lars Eckstein, Peter J. Capuano, and Joanna Wolfe focus their analysis on Morrison's "jazzthetic" quality or the novel's similarities to a slave song; they also argue that the numerous songs incorporated in the novel make the musical quality of her writing essential to understanding this novel. By focusing on the supposed musical quality of her writing, critics have missed Morrison's political purpose. This paper argues that Beloved shows that the dominant white culture, historically contemptuous of the black experience, defines slavery in ways that create trauma for black Americans. Traumatic fiction, it suggests, allows Morrison to access the past and rewrite slavery's narrative. Traumatic techniques allow Morrison to transform her readers into co-witnesses so that a victim's trauma can be externalized, giving the victims much-needed distance from their trauma. That distance allows victims to revisit, reflect, rework, and retell history from a black perspective in order to transcend shame of slavery imposed by white society. Morrison uses traumatic fiction techniques because they provide a language, unmarked by white discourse, for Morrison to tell a black story of slavery that resists forgetting and silencing. Morrison challenges the seemingly authenticated historical story that upholds individualism in order to create room for a new black cultural memory that highlights community, which is its true story. Advisors/Committee Members: Rotter, Kimberly Rose, 1981- (author), Singley, Carol J (chair), Blackford, Holly V (co-chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Morrison; Toni. Beloved

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APA (6th Edition):

Rotter, Kimberly Rose, 1. (2010). Beloved: a political composition. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10005600001.ETD.000053089

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rotter, Kimberly Rose, 1981-. “Beloved: a political composition.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10005600001.ETD.000053089.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rotter, Kimberly Rose, 1981-. “Beloved: a political composition.” 2010. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Rotter, Kimberly Rose 1. Beloved: a political composition. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2010. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10005600001.ETD.000053089.

Council of Science Editors:

Rotter, Kimberly Rose 1. Beloved: a political composition. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10005600001.ETD.000053089


Rutgers University

2. Pierucci, Christine M., 1986-. Indian possession and playing: an American tradition from Tom Sawyer to today.

Degree: MA, English, 2012, Rutgers University

Toni Morrison's deconstructionist analysis of the Africanist presence in nineteenth century texts is complemented by analysis of Nativist presence in the same time period and beyond. While the Africanist presence, or lack thereof, helped white authors express the venture for a democratic freedom, the Nativist presence has helped—and continues to help—white authors articulate an American identity which is romantic and distinctly their own, separate from Europe. A number of texts published in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries portray Native Americans in a paradoxical way: the figure is simultaneously the quintessential villain, savage and untrustworthy, and a romantic object of play, resistant to civilization and therefore a figure to be possessed and emulated. At the core of this paradoxical representation is Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876). The novel's villain, Injun Joe, is the epitome of evil, yet the Native American is still the object of Tom's imagination and infatuation. Even while Injun Joe is conveniently left to starve and die in an isolated setting, literally blocked from the rest of the civilization. Tom continues to "play Indian." Twain's novel appears at the transitional period between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and it captures the ideologies of playing Indian and more specifically, the American ideologies within children's literature. This perpetuation of playing Indian lessons in children's literature is one which should be challenged and critiqued. The project will begin with an interrogation of the literary-historical roots of this cultural tradition, as found in Moby-Dick, The Last of the Mohicans, and Hohomok Then, Tom Sawyer will be employed as the transitional piece between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, linking the literary-historical accounts with more contemporary novels and films that exacerbate this trope, including Little House on the Prairie. The Catcher in the Rye, The Indian in the Cupboard, The Bean Trees, Disney's Pocahontas films, and Twentieth Century Fox's Night at the Museum. Rounding out the study is The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which proves that the American fantasy continually permeates American children's literature and culture. Advisors/Committee Members: Pierucci, Christine M., 1986- (author), Blackford, Holly V (chair), Singley, Carol J (co-chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Indians in literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pierucci, Christine M., 1. (2012). Indian possession and playing: an American tradition from Tom Sawyer to today. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10005600001.ETD.000063968

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pierucci, Christine M., 1986-. “Indian possession and playing: an American tradition from Tom Sawyer to today.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10005600001.ETD.000063968.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pierucci, Christine M., 1986-. “Indian possession and playing: an American tradition from Tom Sawyer to today.” 2012. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Pierucci, Christine M. 1. Indian possession and playing: an American tradition from Tom Sawyer to today. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10005600001.ETD.000063968.

Council of Science Editors:

Pierucci, Christine M. 1. Indian possession and playing: an American tradition from Tom Sawyer to today. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10005600001.ETD.000063968


Rutgers University

3. Cvetkovic, Vibiana Bowman, 1953-. Cold War children’s television in the City of Brotherly Love: a history and analysis.

Degree: PhD, Children's television programs  – Pennsylvania  – Philadelphia, 2019, Rutgers University

This dissertation is both a history and a critical analysis of a culturally significant phenomenon of the Cold War—the locally produced hosted children’s show. The hosted children’s show utilized a format that was ubiquitous throughout the United States during this era. Using Philadelphia as a case study I examine the specific elements of performance that the hosts used to create a parasocial bond with the child viewer that was simultaneously non-threatening and non-conforming. Situating the performances of these hosts within the framework of narrative theory and television studies, I analyze how hosts pushed boundaries of gender, race, class, and sexuality in their shows, while presenting material that embedded stereotypes. While simultaneously pioneering and conservative in their messages, the hosts carefully navigated cultural anxieties in the Cold War’s approach to addressing and raising children. The Cold War era and the coming of age of commercial television were entwined not only chronologically but culturally. Cultural and media historians like Sammond, Spigel, Englehardt, and Slotkin have examined how national anxieties and the debates over what it meant to be “American” were represented in popular culture and particularly the new mass media of television. The scholars noted above posited that the storylines and characterizations of early commercial television shows were sites of mediation for the American viewer serving as visual representations of evolving concepts: a prosperous suburban class, manhood, womanhood and childhood. The children who watched the enormously popular hosted cartoon shows were part of this national conversation and the hosts of these shows were a nexus of this mediation of American identity. The era of the locally produced hosted show closed in the wake of Sesame Street due to shifts in social policy, industry economics, and rising expectations for children programming. A cloak of nostalgia now surrounds these shows in the memories of the former viewers and industry participants. However, this project’s study reveals that beyond that nostalgia lies a vital cultural form that thrived in the Cold War era; one that reflected the ideals of childhood, media, and nation of a cultural terrain from which the children’s television host emerged.

Advisors/Committee Members: Blackford, Holly V. (chair), Cook, Daniel T. (internal member), Miller, Susan (internal member).

Subjects/Keywords: Childhood Studies; Cold War in mass media  – Influence  – Pennsylvania  – Philadelphia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cvetkovic, Vibiana Bowman, 1. (2019). Cold War children’s television in the City of Brotherly Love: a history and analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60705/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cvetkovic, Vibiana Bowman, 1953-. “Cold War children’s television in the City of Brotherly Love: a history and analysis.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60705/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cvetkovic, Vibiana Bowman, 1953-. “Cold War children’s television in the City of Brotherly Love: a history and analysis.” 2019. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Cvetkovic, Vibiana Bowman 1. Cold War children’s television in the City of Brotherly Love: a history and analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60705/.

Council of Science Editors:

Cvetkovic, Vibiana Bowman 1. Cold War children’s television in the City of Brotherly Love: a history and analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60705/

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