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You searched for +publisher:"Rochester Institute of Technology" +contributor:("Heidi Mix"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rochester Institute of Technology

1. Wiele, Paul. Healthcare Incident Reporting: The Impacts of Usability of Input Interfaces, Usability of Resulting Data, and Attitudes Towards Reporting.

Degree: MS, Psychology (CLA), 2016, Rochester Institute of Technology

Research into improving the safety of healthcare systems has recently focused on learning how incidents of harm to patients happen and how to prevent them. Although it is acknowledged that low participation in incident-reporting systems contributes to the problem of poor error prevention, little research has focused on improving participation. This research is focused on how both participation in and use of incident-reporting systems can be improved by examining the usability of the reporting tools. A large private hospital in the northeastern United States and the incident reporting app used there were examined as a case study. A mixed-methods approach using Critical Decision Method interviews, heuristic usability tests, and surveys was used. Seemingly minor usability issues like inconvenient and hard to read menus were found to inhibit both the quantity and quality of incident reports. Additionally, despite the organization having a generally strong safety culture, there were organizational obstacles to the reporting of incidents and the adoption of useful interventions in response to incidents beyond what is normally encompassed by the term “safety culture”. Specific recommendations for hospital incident reporting process improvement are included. Advisors/Committee Members: Esa Rantanen, Heidi Mix, Karlee Haschmann.

Subjects/Keywords: Human error; Human factors; Incident reporting; Safety culture; Usability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wiele, P. (2016). Healthcare Incident Reporting: The Impacts of Usability of Input Interfaces, Usability of Resulting Data, and Attitudes Towards Reporting. (Masters Thesis). Rochester Institute of Technology. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/9032

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wiele, Paul. “Healthcare Incident Reporting: The Impacts of Usability of Input Interfaces, Usability of Resulting Data, and Attitudes Towards Reporting.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Rochester Institute of Technology. Accessed September 23, 2019. https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/9032.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wiele, Paul. “Healthcare Incident Reporting: The Impacts of Usability of Input Interfaces, Usability of Resulting Data, and Attitudes Towards Reporting.” 2016. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Wiele P. Healthcare Incident Reporting: The Impacts of Usability of Input Interfaces, Usability of Resulting Data, and Attitudes Towards Reporting. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/9032.

Council of Science Editors:

Wiele P. Healthcare Incident Reporting: The Impacts of Usability of Input Interfaces, Usability of Resulting Data, and Attitudes Towards Reporting. [Masters Thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/9032


Rochester Institute of Technology

2. Umansky, Jonathan. Workload in Nursing: A Descriptive Study Using Cognitive Work Analysis.

Degree: MS, Psychology (CLA), 2015, Rochester Institute of Technology

Nursing is a high workload profession, and excessive workload has been shown to have an adverse effect on patient care. This problem has been compounded by shortages of qualified nurses in hospitals, resulting in increased workload of the existing nursing staff. Prior research has focused on patient-staff ratios and skill mix to analyze the relationship of workload and degradation of care. The current research implemented a multi-dimensional model for analyzing nurses’ workload in a large general hospital. This method afforded the researcher the opportunity to examine a work domain from multiple angles. Nurses play versatile roles, and workload extends beyond the care of the patient with team and organizational responsibilities. The current research expanded on the concept of a multi-dimensional approach to workload in nursing. Workload drivers were introduced as multiple, unique factors that contributed to the totality of nursing workload. Prior research examined such factors as organizational and environmental factors (patient acuity) and factors that vary within a nurse’s shift (time pressure). The current study engaged in a systematic examination of these concepts, in addition to extracting workload drivers that were specific to the observation setting (different departments at Rochester General Hospital). A Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) was conducted to map out the work domain of nurses, and identified sources of workload. This was a detailed and multi-stage investigation of nursing in terms of goals, functions, tasks, physical resources, and mental states and processes (decision making). The output was a collection of diagrams, tables, and interviews that illustrated areas in nursing that produced the most workload. A detailed integration of the material supported an estimation of workload experienced by nurses. Advisors/Committee Members: Esa M. Rantanen, Heidi Mix, Samuel Huber.

Subjects/Keywords: Human factors; Nursing; Workload

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Umansky, J. (2015). Workload in Nursing: A Descriptive Study Using Cognitive Work Analysis. (Masters Thesis). Rochester Institute of Technology. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/8949

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Umansky, Jonathan. “Workload in Nursing: A Descriptive Study Using Cognitive Work Analysis.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Rochester Institute of Technology. Accessed September 23, 2019. https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/8949.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Umansky, Jonathan. “Workload in Nursing: A Descriptive Study Using Cognitive Work Analysis.” 2015. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Umansky J. Workload in Nursing: A Descriptive Study Using Cognitive Work Analysis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/8949.

Council of Science Editors:

Umansky J. Workload in Nursing: A Descriptive Study Using Cognitive Work Analysis. [Masters Thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2015. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/8949

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