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You searched for +publisher:"Rochester Institute of Technology" +contributor:("Fluet, Matthew"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rochester Institute of Technology

1. Holm, Ben. Evaluation of RSL history as a tool for assistance in the development and evaluation of computer vision algorithms.

Degree: Computer Science (GCCIS), 2011, Rochester Institute of Technology

A revision of Recognition Strategy Language (RSL), a domain-specific language for pattern recognition algorithm development, is in development. This language provides several tools for pattern recognition algorithm implementation and analysis, including composition of operations and a detailed history of those operations and their results. This research focuses on that history and shows that for some problems it provides an improvement over traditional methods of gathering information. When designing a pattern recognition algorithm, bookkeeping code in the form of copious logging and tracing code must be written and analyzed in order to test the effectiveness of procedures and parameters. The amount of data grows when dealing with video streams; new organization and searching tools need to be designed in order to manage the large volume of data. General purpose languages have techniques like Aspect Oriented Programming intended to address this problem, but a general approach is limited because it does not provide tools that are useful to only one problem domain. By incorporating support for this bookkeeping work directly into the language, RSL provides an improvement over the general approach in both development time and ability to evaluate the algorithm being designed for some problems. The utility of RSL is tested by evaluating the implementation process of a computer vision algorithm for recognizing American Sign Language (ASL). RSL history is examined in terms of its use in the development and evaluation stages of the algorithm, and the usefulness of the history is stated based on the benefit seen at each stage. RSL is found to be valuable for a portion of the algorithm involving distinct steps that provide opportunity for comparison. RSL was less beneficial for the dynamic programming portion of the algorithm. Compromises were made for performance reasons while implementing the dynamic programming solution and the inspection at every step of what amounts to a brute-force search was less informative. We suggest that this investigation could be continued by testing with a larger data set and by comparing this ASL recognition algorithm with another. Advisors/Committee Members: Fluet, Matthew, Zanibbi, Richard.

Subjects/Keywords: American sign language; ASL; Recognition strategy language; RSL

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Holm, B. (2011). Evaluation of RSL history as a tool for assistance in the development and evaluation of computer vision algorithms. (Thesis). Rochester Institute of Technology. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/229

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Holm, Ben. “Evaluation of RSL history as a tool for assistance in the development and evaluation of computer vision algorithms.” 2011. Thesis, Rochester Institute of Technology. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/229.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Holm, Ben. “Evaluation of RSL history as a tool for assistance in the development and evaluation of computer vision algorithms.” 2011. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Holm B. Evaluation of RSL history as a tool for assistance in the development and evaluation of computer vision algorithms. [Internet] [Thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/229.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Holm B. Evaluation of RSL history as a tool for assistance in the development and evaluation of computer vision algorithms. [Thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/229

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Rochester Institute of Technology

2. Amsden, Edward. Timeflies: Push-pull signal-function functional reactive programming.

Degree: Computer Science (GCCIS), 2013, Rochester Institute of Technology

Functional Reactive Programming (FRP) is a promising class of abstractions for interactive programs. FRP systems provide values defined at all points in time (behaviors or signals) and values defined at countably many points in time (events) as abstractions. Signal-function FRP is a subclass of FRP which does not provide direct access to time-varying values to the programmer, but instead provides signal functions, which are reactive transformers of signals and events, as first-class objects in the program. All signal-function implementations of FRP to date have utilized demand-driven or "pull-based" evaluation for both events and signals, producing output from the FRP system whenever the consumer of the output is ready. This greatly simplifies the implementation of signal-function FRP systems, but leads to inefficient and wasteful evaluation of the FRP system when this strategy is employed to evaluate events, because the components of the signal function which process events must be computed whether or not there is an event occurrence. In contrast, an input-driven or "push-based" system evaluates the network whenever new input is available. This frees the system from evaluating the network when nothing has changed, and then only the components necessary to react to the input are re-evaluated. This form of evaluation has been applied to events in standard FRP systems but not in signal-function FRP systems. I describe the design and implementation of a signal-function FRP system which applies pull-based evaluation to signals and push-based evaluation to events (a "push-pull" system). The semantics of the system are discussed, and its performance and expressiveness for practical examples of interactive programs are compared to existing signal-function FRP systems through the implementation of a networking application. Advisors/Committee Members: Fluet, Matthew, Nunes-Harwitt, Arthur, Butler, Zach.

Subjects/Keywords: Functional programming; Functional reactive programming; Programming languages

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Amsden, E. (2013). Timeflies: Push-pull signal-function functional reactive programming. (Thesis). Rochester Institute of Technology. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/5512

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Amsden, Edward. “Timeflies: Push-pull signal-function functional reactive programming.” 2013. Thesis, Rochester Institute of Technology. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/5512.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Amsden, Edward. “Timeflies: Push-pull signal-function functional reactive programming.” 2013. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Amsden E. Timeflies: Push-pull signal-function functional reactive programming. [Internet] [Thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/5512.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Amsden E. Timeflies: Push-pull signal-function functional reactive programming. [Thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2013. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/5512

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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