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You searched for +publisher:"Rice University" +contributor:("McDaniel, William C."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rice University

1. Valentin, Edward. Black Enlisted Men in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Race, Citizenship, and Military Occupation, 1866-1930.

Degree: PhD, Humanities, 2020, Rice University

This dissertation relies on underused sources—including court martial records and black veterans’ pension files—to examine the experiences of black soldiers in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands during the post-Civil War era. It focuses on soldiers’ cross-cultural encounters with the racially and ethnically diverse communities that surrounded the posts they garrisoned, revealing how black enlisted men viewed and attempted to define their positions within the complex and fluid social order of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. An analysis of black soldiers’ experiences enriches our understandings of race, ethnicity, gender, and settler colonialism by illuminating how these men both supported and undermined U.S. imperial projects. As agents of U.S. expansion, black troops actively transformed the West and secured the region for white settlements, but simultaneously undermined U.S. expansion by challenging the military justice system and building relationships that transcended the very boundaries they were charged with policing. This project thus not only sheds light on the experiences of black soldiers in the American West, but also enriches our understandings of the complicated processes associated with settler colonialism and claims to rights and citizenship in the post-Civil War era. Advisors/Committee Members: McDaniel, William C. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: African American History; Borderlands History; Military History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Valentin, E. (2020). Black Enlisted Men in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Race, Citizenship, and Military Occupation, 1866-1930. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/108363

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Valentin, Edward. “Black Enlisted Men in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Race, Citizenship, and Military Occupation, 1866-1930.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/108363.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Valentin, Edward. “Black Enlisted Men in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Race, Citizenship, and Military Occupation, 1866-1930.” 2020. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Valentin E. Black Enlisted Men in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Race, Citizenship, and Military Occupation, 1866-1930. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2020. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/108363.

Council of Science Editors:

Valentin E. Black Enlisted Men in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Race, Citizenship, and Military Occupation, 1866-1930. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/108363

2. Black, William R. No Northern or Southern Religion: Cumberland Presbyterians and the Christian Nation, 1800–1877.

Degree: PhD, Humanities, 2018, Rice University

Historians have struggled to define the evangelical consensus that dominated American life for most of the nineteenth century. Scholars of the antebellum church tend to emphasize how it exacerbated sectional tension and precipitated the Civil War, while scholars of the postbellum church emphasize how it bolstered sectional reunion. But how can both have been true? I address this question by examining one denomination, the bulk of whose membership lived in the trans-Appalachian South and the lower Midwest. Focusing on one denomination averts the shortcomings of studying American evangelicalism as a homogenous whole when it was no such thing. Moreover, the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, because it was arguably the largest denomination not to divide along sectional lines during the Civil War era, allows us to locate important continuities across time (before and after the war) and space (north and south of the Mason-Dixon line). And what do I find? That the heart of the evangelical consensus was the project of the Christian nation—the belief that America had a special mission to purify the church and evangelize the globe. At least for the Cumberland Presbyterians, Christian nationalism was a useful tool in addressing the two great problems that a Protestant denomination faced in the nineteenth-century United States: namely, the religious marketplace and the institution of slavery. But at the same time, those two same forces actually undercut the Cumberland Presbyterian narrative of the Christian nation. This paradox helps explain how Christian nationalism, and by extension the evangelical consensus, could both reinforce and undermine the union of the republic. Advisors/Committee Members: McDaniel, William C (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Cumberland Presbyterians; evangelicalism; Christian nationalism; slavery debate; sectionalism; moderation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Black, W. R. (2018). No Northern or Southern Religion: Cumberland Presbyterians and the Christian Nation, 1800–1877. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/105835

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Black, William R. “No Northern or Southern Religion: Cumberland Presbyterians and the Christian Nation, 1800–1877.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/105835.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Black, William R. “No Northern or Southern Religion: Cumberland Presbyterians and the Christian Nation, 1800–1877.” 2018. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Black WR. No Northern or Southern Religion: Cumberland Presbyterians and the Christian Nation, 1800–1877. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2018. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/105835.

Council of Science Editors:

Black WR. No Northern or Southern Religion: Cumberland Presbyterians and the Christian Nation, 1800–1877. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/105835

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