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You searched for +publisher:"Rice University" +contributor:("McDaniel, Caleb"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Rice University

1. McCall, Keith D. Reconstructing Race, Place, and Population: Postemancipation Migrations and the Making of the Black South, 1865–1915.

Degree: PhD, Humanities, 2019, Rice University

This dissertation explores the African American search for belonging in the Reconstruction era from demographic and geographical perspectives, making three overlapping arguments. First, that migration within the South, rather than only from the South, was critical to the construction of a shared political identity among freedpeople. Second, that broader debates over where freedpeople belonged were central to late-nineteenth-century understandings of region, place, and citizenship in the United States; and third, that migration and its debates shaped intellectual frameworks of integration and pluralism by linking demographics and geography to the functioning of democracy. The dissertation bridges the histories of enslavement and Reconstruction, looking back to the antebellum period rather than forward to the Great Migration to interpret freedpeople’s migrations in the Reconstruction era. Exploring on-the-ground migration, this work builds on recent literature of the internal slave trade to show how movement restructured freedpeople’s kinship and information networks, creating networks that spanned hundreds of miles. As freedpeople told each other of distant places, they forged broader political consciousnesses and created geographical frameworks explaining how space shaped the potentialities of freedom. Those geographical ideas and information networks sustained a significant internal population movement among freedpeople, as they left the eastern and upper South for the Gulf South and Mississippi Delta. That population shift, which increased the demographic concentration of the black population in the U.S. South, eventually spawned discussions of a “population distribution” that would resettle the African American population throughout the nation as a method of socially engineering integration and, presumably, better race relations. But Booker T. Washington and others rejected the idea that becoming more fully American meant leaving the South and severing a regional identity. Ultimately, the success of freedpeople’s intra-South migrations and the related discussions of out-of-the-South migration shaped a cultural and political emphasis on black southerness by about 1900. By blending such stories, “Reconstructing Race, Place, and Population” demonstrates that ideas about spatial belonging and social belonging formed and shaped each other during the era of Reconstruction. Advisors/Committee Members: McDaniel, Caleb (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: African American Migration; Civil War era; Reconstruction; Migration; U.S. South; emancipation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCall, K. D. (2019). Reconstructing Race, Place, and Population: Postemancipation Migrations and the Making of the Black South, 1865–1915. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/105405

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCall, Keith D. “Reconstructing Race, Place, and Population: Postemancipation Migrations and the Making of the Black South, 1865–1915.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/105405.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCall, Keith D. “Reconstructing Race, Place, and Population: Postemancipation Migrations and the Making of the Black South, 1865–1915.” 2019. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

McCall KD. Reconstructing Race, Place, and Population: Postemancipation Migrations and the Making of the Black South, 1865–1915. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2019. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/105405.

Council of Science Editors:

McCall KD. Reconstructing Race, Place, and Population: Postemancipation Migrations and the Making of the Black South, 1865–1915. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/105405


Rice University

2. Stewart, Whitney Nell. The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom.

Degree: PhD, Humanities, 2017, Rice University

While most historians interpret the motivations of the black freedom struggle—including the acquisition of legal freedom and citizenship—as public and traditionally political issues, this project places black homes at the center of the narrative. Scholars often overlook how the rights of home—including privacy, freedom of movement, and the security of self and family in one’s dwelling—suffused the private and public politics of nineteenth-century Americans. Black women and men sought solutions to violent social injustices by drawing on a long tradition of resistance and activism that began before the opening of ballot boxes, government offices, and citizenship. They sought freedom and rights through the home. This dissertation uses a wide range of material, visual, and textual sources to demonstrate how enslaved and free black Americans gave meaning to their lives, shaped their hopes, and sought individual and social change through their dwelling space, structure, and objects. Home was a concept, space, and structure that shaped the meaning and experience of slavery and liberty. Throughout the long nineteenth century, the black home functioned simultaneously as a symbol that could destroy or invigorate the racist social structure that undergirded slavery. In physical dwellings throughout the American South, black men and women fought to build privacy and security into their dwellings and lives, even as white southerners racialized these rights for white families only. Looking across the chasm of war and emancipation uncovers the crucial role of home to evolving notions of freedom in the tumultuous long nineteenth century. Revealing the connections between race, home, and liberty, this project reorients the narrative of the black freedom struggle towards the domestic spaces and objects that shaped the politics of nineteenth-century Americans. Advisors/Committee Members: Sidbury, James (advisor), McDaniel, Caleb (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: American history; African American history

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stewart, W. N. (2017). The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96112

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stewart, Whitney Nell. “The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96112.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stewart, Whitney Nell. “The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom.” 2017. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Stewart WN. The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2017. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96112.

Council of Science Editors:

Stewart WN. The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96112


Rice University

3. Stewart, Whitney Nell. The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom.

Degree: PhD, History, 2017, Rice University

While most historians interpret the motivations of the black freedom struggle—including the acquisition of legal freedom and citizenship—as public and traditionally political issues, this project places black homes at the center of the narrative. Scholars often overlook how the rights of home—including privacy, freedom of movement, and the security of self and family in one’s dwelling—suffused the private and public politics of nineteenth-century Americans. Black women and men sought solutions to violent social injustices by drawing on a long tradition of resistance and activism that began before the opening of ballot boxes, government offices, and citizenship. They sought freedom and rights through the home. This dissertation uses a wide range of material, visual, and textual sources to demonstrate how enslaved and free black Americans gave meaning to their lives, shaped their hopes, and sought individual and social change through their dwelling space, structure, and objects. Home was a concept, space, and structure that shaped the meaning and experience of slavery and liberty. Throughout the long nineteenth century, the black home functioned simultaneously as a symbol that could destroy or invigorate the racist social structure that undergirded slavery. In physical dwellings throughout the American South, black men and women fought to build privacy and security into their dwellings and lives, even as white southerners racialized these rights for white families only. Looking across the chasm of war and emancipation uncovers the crucial role of home to evolving notions of freedom in the tumultuous long nineteenth century. Revealing the connections between race, home, and liberty, this project reorients the narrative of the black freedom struggle towards the domestic spaces and objects that shaped the politics of nineteenth-century Americans. Advisors/Committee Members: Sidbury, James (advisor), McDaniel, Caleb (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: American history; African American history

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stewart, W. N. (2017). The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96113

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stewart, Whitney Nell. “The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96113.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stewart, Whitney Nell. “The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom.” 2017. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Stewart WN. The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2017. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96113.

Council of Science Editors:

Stewart WN. The Racialized Politics of Home in Slavery and Freedom. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96113

.