Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Purdue University" +contributor:("Thomas J. Templin"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Purdue University

1. Gao, Haijuan. Exploring knowledge and beliefs of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccination among U.S. Chinese international students.

Degree: PhD, Health and Kinesiology, 2015, Purdue University

The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides an effective prevention strategy against HPV infection, cervical cancer, and genital warts. As increasing numbers of Chinese international students (CIS) are living and studying in United States, this specific ethnic group has become the candidate for HPV vaccination promotion. Despite an increased awareness and knowledge of HPV infection and HPV vaccine among U.S. college students, studies focused on CIS as a unique ethnic group regarding HPV vaccine promotion were limited. This project is the first time aimed to examine CIS's awareness, knowledge and beliefs about HPV infection, HPV vaccine, cervical cancer and genital warts. During the summer and fall of 2013, CIS attending a Midwestern university in the United States were recruited to take part in two studies: one quantitative study (employing online anonymous survey) and one qualitative study (employing focus group discussions). A total of 751 students participated in the survey. Surveys from 350 participants aged 18-26 years (mean=21.42) who had not been vaccinated for HPV were included in the data analysis. Ten focus groups were conducted with 44 CIS aged 18-34 (mean=24.6). The discussions were audio taped, transcribed and analyzed. The results demonstrated six major findings: (1) There was limited awareness, knowledge and intention about HPV vaccine among CIS. Only 27.2% of the 350 participants had ever heard of the HPV vaccine. Most participants were unaware of the cause of cervical cancer, and considered genital warts as "secret" "dirty" diseases. (2) There were sex differences with regard to CIS's intentions and beliefs of HPV infection and HPV vaccine. Female CIS 69.2% were more likely than male CIS (34.9%) to receive an HPV vaccine in the future. Significantly, more female than male participants thought that HPV infection would influence their romantic relationship and that their family and partners would support their decision to receive an HPV vaccination. The only significant predictors of CIS' vaccination intention was the vaccination behavior of best friends, particularly among female subjects. (3) There was evidence of a significant lack of formal sex education and formal information sources for all CIS. Parents and friends were not considered appropriate sources to seek support and information. Sources for information were informal: street advertisements and social websites such as "Renren." (4) There were more open attitudes toward sexual behavior compared to Chinese women who were subjects of earlier surveys. Premarital sexual behaviors and multiple sexual relationships were acceptable in this cohort of CIS. (5) Sexual cultures and behaviors were perceived different between CIS born in the 1990s versus the 1980s. (6) CIS' perceived stigma about HPV infection varied by knowledge level during the discussion. This study describes current perceptions of STI and HPV vaccination among CIS and identifies current perceptions of young Chinese adults who live abroad, especially with respect to their… Advisors/Committee Members: Gerald C. Hyner, Titilatyo A. Okoror, Thomas J. Templin.

Subjects/Keywords: Applied Behavior Analysis; Psychology; Public Health

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gao, H. (2015). Exploring knowledge and beliefs of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccination among U.S. Chinese international students. (Doctoral Dissertation). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/456

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gao, Haijuan. “Exploring knowledge and beliefs of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccination among U.S. Chinese international students.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Purdue University. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/456.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gao, Haijuan. “Exploring knowledge and beliefs of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccination among U.S. Chinese international students.” 2015. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Gao H. Exploring knowledge and beliefs of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccination among U.S. Chinese international students. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Purdue University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/456.

Council of Science Editors:

Gao H. Exploring knowledge and beliefs of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccination among U.S. Chinese international students. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Purdue University; 2015. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/456


Purdue University

2. Jin, Lan. DON’T WORRY, I AM FINE: A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF FAMILY COMMUNICATION AND DEPRESSION IN CHINESE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN THE US.

Degree: MS, Consumer Science, 2014, Purdue University

Depression and associated mental health problems are increasingly a critical health issue for Chinese international students in the U.S. (Lyubomirsky, Kasri, & Zehm, 2003; Cheung, 2011; Liu, 2009). Recent studies in different U.S. universities found a 32% to 47% rate for depression symptoms among Chinese international students (Cheung, 2011; Wei et al., 2007). The statistics suggest that Chinese students face a high prevalence of depression problems (Han et al., 2013). To address the depression problems, family communication provides substantial support for Chinese students (Liu, 2009). However, little is known about family communicative practices of this population (Wei et al., 2010). Extant studies and reviews show that there is a strong need to study depression and family communication in Chinese international students to better respond to their needs (Xing et al., 2010). This research aimed to explore the meanings of depression and parental communication practices in Chinese international students in the U.S., and find recommendations for developing family communication interventions that address depression. The participants were recruited through convenient sampling and purposive sampling method in the Chinese communities at Purdue. The data was collected by interviews and focus groups, and further transcribed and translated from Chinese into English. The software NVivo 10 was used to support data analysis, and grounded theory method was employed (Glasser & Strauss, 1967). Thematic analysis of the data developed the following themes: (1) meanings of depression: psychological, physiological and social disorder, (2) selective depression communication with parents, (3) positive and negative feedback of parents influence depression communication, (4) different communication styles of mothers and fathers, (5) childhood experiences influence depression communicative practices, (6) interdependence and conflicting expectations restrain depression communication. This study of depression communication contributes to the large field of emotion communication within the family, providing implications into family training programs, health professional practice, and university administration to better understand the needs of Chinese international students, and offer effective support to cope with depression. Advisors/Committee Members: Lalatendu Acharya, Erina L. MacGeorge, Meghan E. Norris, Thomas J. Templin.

Subjects/Keywords: Communication and the arts; Psychology; Chinese students; Depression; Family communication; Clinical Psychology; Communication

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jin, L. (2014). DON’T WORRY, I AM FINE: A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF FAMILY COMMUNICATION AND DEPRESSION IN CHINESE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN THE US. (Thesis). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/195

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jin, Lan. “DON’T WORRY, I AM FINE: A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF FAMILY COMMUNICATION AND DEPRESSION IN CHINESE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN THE US.” 2014. Thesis, Purdue University. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/195.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jin, Lan. “DON’T WORRY, I AM FINE: A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF FAMILY COMMUNICATION AND DEPRESSION IN CHINESE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN THE US.” 2014. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Jin L. DON’T WORRY, I AM FINE: A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF FAMILY COMMUNICATION AND DEPRESSION IN CHINESE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN THE US. [Internet] [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/195.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jin L. DON’T WORRY, I AM FINE: A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF FAMILY COMMUNICATION AND DEPRESSION IN CHINESE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN THE US. [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2014. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/195

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Richards, Kevin Andrew. Understanding Teacher/Coach Role Stressors and Burnout.

Degree: PhD, Health and Kinesiology, 2013, Purdue University

Teaching has long been considered a stressful profession and is becoming even more stressful because of recent changes in state- and national-level educational policies that govern K-12 education. Teachers who take on additional, extracurricular roles, such as athletic coaching, may be even more prone to stress and burnout. Using occupational socialization theory and role theory, the purpose of this dissertation was to develop a more comprehensive understanding of role stressors, burnout, and resilience among teacher/coaches and non-coaching teachers. The study was divided into two phases. In phase one, 415 teachers (209 teacher/coaches, 206 non-coaching teachers) across a variety of academic disciplines in the American Midwest completed an online survey related to their feelings of role stressors, burnout, and resilience. These data were analyzed using factorial ANOVAs, exploratory and confirmatory factory analysis, multiple linear regression, and structural equation modeling. Results indicate that, while teacher/coaches and non-coaching teachers vary on some elements of role stressors, burnout, and resilience, the two groups share more similarities than differences. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that selected role stressors and components of burnout influence teachers' ability to develop resilient capacities. Finally, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis resulted in the development and validation of a scale specifically intended to measure teacher/coach role conflict. In phase two, a subset of participants were invited to participate in interviews based on their perceived levels of role stressors and burnout. At the completion of this dissertation, phase two was still ongoing, but initial insights from the interviews are discussed. The results of this study speak to the importance of teachers' cognitive and emotional wellbeing. Implications for reducing role stressors and burnout and for fostering resilience are discussed at length. Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas J. Templin, Thomas J. Templin, Bonnie T. Blankenship, Kim Graber, Chantal Levesque- Bristol.

Subjects/Keywords: burnout; resilience; role stress; teacher; coach; education; Educational Sociology; Other Education

…Understanding Teacher/Coach Role Stressors and Burnout. Major Professor: Thomas J. Templin. Teaching… …225 xviii ABSTRACT Rosse-Richards, Kevin Andrew. Ph.D., Purdue University, December 2013… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Richards, K. A. (2013). Understanding Teacher/Coach Role Stressors and Burnout. (Doctoral Dissertation). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/69

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Richards, Kevin Andrew. “Understanding Teacher/Coach Role Stressors and Burnout.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Purdue University. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/69.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Richards, Kevin Andrew. “Understanding Teacher/Coach Role Stressors and Burnout.” 2013. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Richards KA. Understanding Teacher/Coach Role Stressors and Burnout. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Purdue University; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/69.

Council of Science Editors:

Richards KA. Understanding Teacher/Coach Role Stressors and Burnout. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Purdue University; 2013. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/69

.