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You searched for +publisher:"Purdue University" +contributor:("Shimon Nof"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Purdue University

1. Duket, Timothy W. The Multi-Depot Minimum Latency Problem with Inter-Depot Routes.

Degree: MS, Industrial Engineering, 2014, Purdue University

The Minimum Latency Problem (MLP) is a class of routing problems that seeks to minimize the wait times (latencies) of a set of customers in a system. Similar to its counterparts in the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) and Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP), the MLP is NP-hard. Unlike these other problem classes, however, the MLP is customer-oriented and thus has impactful potential for better serving customers in settings where they are the highest priority. While the VRP is very widely researched and applied to many industry settings to reduce travel times and costs for service-providers, the MLP is a more recent problem and does not have nearly the body of literature supporting it as found in the VRP. However, it is gaining significant attention recently because of its application to such areas as disaster relief logistics, which are a growing problem area in a global context and have potential for meaningful improvements that translate into reduced suffering and saved lives. An effective combination of MLP's and route minimizing objectives can help relief agencies provide aid efficiently and within a manageable cost. To further the body of literature on the MLP and its applications to such settings, a new variant is introduced here called the Multi-Depot Minimum Latency Problem with Inter-Depot Routes (MDMLPI). This problem seeks to minimize the cumulative arrival times at all customers in a system being serviced by multiple vehicles and depots. Vehicles depart from one central depot and have the option of refilling their supply at a number of intermediate depots. While the equivalent problem has been studied using a VRP objective function, this is a new variant of the MLP. As such, a mathematical model is introduced along with several heuristics to provide the first solution approaches to solving it. Two objectives are considered in this work: minimizing latency, or arrival times at each customer, and minimizing weighted latency, which is the product of customer need and arrival time at that customer. The case of weighted latency carries additional significance as it may correspond to a larger number of customers at one location, thus adding emphasis to the speed with which they are serviced. Additionally, a discussion on fairness and application to disaster relief settings is maintained throughout. To reflect this, standard deviation among latencies is also evaluated as a measure of fairness in each of the solution approaches. Two heuristic approaches, as well as a second-phase adjustment to be applied to each, are introduced. The first is based on an auction policy in which customers bid to be the next stop on a vehicle's tour. The second uses a procedure, referred to as an insertion technique, in which customers are inserted one-by-one into a partial routing solution such that each addition minimizes the (weighted) latency impact of that single customer. The second-phase modification takes the initial solutions achieved in the first two heuristics and considers the (weighted) latency impact of… Advisors/Committee Members: Seokcheon Lee, Shimon Nof, Jose M. Tanchoco.

Subjects/Keywords: Applied sciences; Heuristic; Humanitarian; Logistics; Routing; Industrial Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Duket, T. W. (2014). The Multi-Depot Minimum Latency Problem with Inter-Depot Routes. (Thesis). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/420

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Duket, Timothy W. “The Multi-Depot Minimum Latency Problem with Inter-Depot Routes.” 2014. Thesis, Purdue University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/420.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Duket, Timothy W. “The Multi-Depot Minimum Latency Problem with Inter-Depot Routes.” 2014. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Duket TW. The Multi-Depot Minimum Latency Problem with Inter-Depot Routes. [Internet] [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/420.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Duket TW. The Multi-Depot Minimum Latency Problem with Inter-Depot Routes. [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2014. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/420

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Purdue University

2. Li, Yu-Ting. Embodied interaction with visualization and spatial navigation in time-sensitive scenarios.

Degree: PhD, Industrial Engineering, 2014, Purdue University

Paraphrasing the theory of embodied cognition, all aspects of our cognition are determined primarily by the contextual information and the means of physical interaction with data and information. In hybrid human-machine systems involving complex decision making, continuously maintaining a high level of attention while employing a deep understanding concerning the task performed as well as its context are essential. Utilizing embodied interaction to interact with machines has the potential to promote thinking and learning according to the theory of embodied cognition proposed by Lakoff. Additionally, the hybrid human-machine system utilizing natural and intuitive communication channels (e.g., gestures, speech, and body stances) should afford an array of cognitive benefits outstripping the more static forms of interaction (e.g., computer keyboard). This research proposes such a computational framework based on a Bayesian approach; this framework infers operator's focus of attention based on the physical expressions of the operators. Specifically, this work aims to assess the effect of embodied interaction on attention during the solution of complex, time-sensitive, spatial navigational problems. Toward the goal of assessing the level of operator's attention, we present a method linking the operator's interaction utility, inference, and reasoning. The level of attention was inferred through networks coined Bayesian Attentional Networks (BANs). BANs are structures describing cause-effect relationships between operator's attention, physical actions and decision-making. The proposed framework also generated a representative BAN, called the Consensus (Majority) Model (CMM); the CMM consists of an iteratively derived and agreed graph among candidate BANs obtained by experts and by the automatic learning process. Finally, the best combinations of interaction modalities and feedback were determined by the use of particular utility functions. This methodology was applied to a spatial navigational scenario; wherein, the operators interacted with dynamic images through a series of decision making processes. Real-world experiments were conducted to assess the framework's ability to infer the operator's levels of attention. Users were instructed to complete a series of spatial-navigational tasks using an assigned pairing of an interaction modality out of five categories (vision-based gesture, glove-based gesture, speech, feet, or body balance) and a feedback modality out of two (visual-based or auditory-based). Experimental results have confirmed that physical expressions are a determining factor in the quality of the solutions in a spatial navigational problem. Moreover, it was found that the combination of foot gestures with visual feedback resulted in the best task performance (p< .001). Results have also shown that embodied interaction-based multimodal interface decreased execution errors that occurred in the cyber-physical scenarios (p < .001). Therefore we conclude that appropriate use… Advisors/Committee Members: Juan Wachs, Juan Wachs, Eugenio Culurciello, Shimon Nof, Brad Duerstock.

Subjects/Keywords: Computer Engineering; Engineering; Industrial Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Li, Y. (2014). Embodied interaction with visualization and spatial navigation in time-sensitive scenarios. (Doctoral Dissertation). Purdue University. Retrieved from https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/323

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Yu-Ting. “Embodied interaction with visualization and spatial navigation in time-sensitive scenarios.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Purdue University. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/323.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Yu-Ting. “Embodied interaction with visualization and spatial navigation in time-sensitive scenarios.” 2014. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Li Y. Embodied interaction with visualization and spatial navigation in time-sensitive scenarios. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Purdue University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/323.

Council of Science Editors:

Li Y. Embodied interaction with visualization and spatial navigation in time-sensitive scenarios. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Purdue University; 2014. Available from: https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/323


Purdue University

3. Nativi Nicolau, Juan Jose. Impact of RFID information-sharing coordination over a supply chain with reverse logistics.

Degree: PhD, Industrial Engineering, 2016, Purdue University

Companies have adopted environmental practices such as reverse logistics over the past few decades. However, studies show that aligning partners inside the green supply chain can be a substantial problem. This lack of coordination can increase overall supply chain cost. Information technology such as Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) has the potential to enable decentralized supply chain coordinate their information. Even though there are research that address RFID on traditional supply chain, few researches address how to coordinate RFID information sharing in a green supply chain. We study, through simulation experiments, two types of RFID information-sharing coordination under different configurations related with their inventory policies: basic and advanced. Statistical analyses show that better results can be presented in advanced RFID configuration given new coordination and inventory policy decisions presented. In addition, these findings shows what are the RFID information-sharing coordination that can provide better system improvement depending on the supply chain scenarios and factors. Advisors/Committee Members: Seokcheon Lee, Seokcheon Lee, Hyonho Chun, Shimon Nof, Jose Tanchoco.

Subjects/Keywords: Applied sciences; Information sharing; Information Technology; RFID; Reverse logistics; Supply chain; Environmental Engineering; Industrial Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nativi Nicolau, J. J. (2016). Impact of RFID information-sharing coordination over a supply chain with reverse logistics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Purdue University. Retrieved from https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/978

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nativi Nicolau, Juan Jose. “Impact of RFID information-sharing coordination over a supply chain with reverse logistics.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Purdue University. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/978.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nativi Nicolau, Juan Jose. “Impact of RFID information-sharing coordination over a supply chain with reverse logistics.” 2016. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Nativi Nicolau JJ. Impact of RFID information-sharing coordination over a supply chain with reverse logistics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Purdue University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/978.

Council of Science Editors:

Nativi Nicolau JJ. Impact of RFID information-sharing coordination over a supply chain with reverse logistics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Purdue University; 2016. Available from: https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/978

.