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You searched for +publisher:"Purdue University" +contributor:("Lia Stanciu"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Purdue University

1. Walker, Emily Kristine. Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility.

Degree: PhD, Materials Engineering, 2015, Purdue University

Due to their strength, elasticity, and durability, a variety of metal alloys are commonly used in medical implants. Traditionally, corrosion-resistant metals have been preferred. These permanent materials can cause negative systemic and local tissue effects in the long-term. Permanent stenting can lead to late-stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Metallic pins and screws for fracture fixation can corrode and fail, cause loss of bone mass, and contribute to inflammation and pain at the implant site, requiring reintervention. Corrodible metallic implants have the potential to prevent many of these complications by providing transient support to the affected tissue, dissolving at a rate congruent with the healing of the tissue. Alloys of iron and manganese (FeMn) exhibit similar fatigue strength, toughness, and elasticity compared with 316L stainless steel, making them very attractive candidates for bioresorbable stents and temporary fracture fixation devices. Much attention in recent years has been given to creating alloys with ideal mechanical properties for various applications. Little work has been done on determining the blood compatibility of these materials or on examining how their surfaces can be improved to improve cell adhesion, however. We examined thethrombogenic response of blood exposed to various resorbable ferrous stent materials through contact with porcine blood. The resorbable materials induced comparable or lower levels of several coagulation factors compared with 316L stainless steel. Little platelet adhesion was observed on any of the tested materials. ^ Endothelialization is an important process after the implantation of a vascular stent, as it prevents damage to the vessel wall that can accelerate neointimal hyperplasia. Micromotion can lead to the formation of fibrous tissue surrounding an orthopedic implant, loosening, and ultimately failure of the implant. Nanoscale features were created on the surfaces of noble metal coatings, silicon, and bioabsorbable materials through ion beam irradiation in order to improve endothelialzation and bone cell adhesion. Gold, palladium, silicon, and iron manganese surfaces were patterned through ion beam irradiation using argon ions. The surface morphology of the samples was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while surface chemistry was examined through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle goniometry measurements. It was not possible to create nanoscale surface features on the surfaces of the gold and palladium films. At near normal incidence, irradiation produced ripples on the surfaces of Si(100), while oblique incidence irradiation produced nanoislands in the presence of impurities on the surface. Iron manganese irradiation resulted in the formation of blade-shaped structures for ion energies between 500eV and 1000eV, and significant iron enrichment at the surface. ^ Chemical treatment can also be used to create surface features that will enhance cell adhesion. Ti6Al4V is one of… Advisors/Committee Members: Lia Stanciu, Lia Stanciu, Jean Paul Allain, Eric Nauman, Jeffrey Youngblood.

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering; Materials Science and Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Walker, E. K. (2015). Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility. (Doctoral Dissertation). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/582

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Walker, Emily Kristine. “Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Purdue University. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/582.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Walker, Emily Kristine. “Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility.” 2015. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Walker EK. Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Purdue University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/582.

Council of Science Editors:

Walker EK. Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Purdue University; 2015. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/582


Purdue University

2. Bae, Heehun. Processing and Characterization of ZR-Based Metallic Glass By Laser Direct Depositon.

Degree: MS, Materials Engineering, 2014, Purdue University

Bulk Metallic Glass has become famous for its exceptional mechanical and corrosion properties. Especially, Zirconium has been the prominent constituent in Bulk Metallic Glass due to its superior glass forming ability, the ability to form amorphous phase with low cooling rate, thereby giving advantages in structural applications. In this study, Zirconium powder was alloyed with Aluminum, Nickel and Copper powder at an atomic ratio of 65:10:10:15, respectively. Using the ball milling process to mix the powders, Zr65 Al10 Ni 10 Cu15 amorphous structure was manufactured by laser direct deposition. Laser power and laser scanning speed were optimized to increase the fraction of amorphous phase. X-ray Diffraction confirmed the existence of both amorphous and crystalline phase by having a wide halo peak and sharp intense peak in the spectrum. Differential Scanning Calorimetry proved the presence of amorphous phase and glass transition was observed to be around 655 K. Scanning electron microscopy showed the microstructure of the deposited sample to have repetitive amorphous and crystalline phase as XRD examined. Crystalline phase resulted from the laser reheating and remelting process due to subsequent laser scan. Laser direct deposited amorphous/crystalline composite showed Vickers Hardness of 670 Hv and exhibited improved corrosion resistance in comparison to fully-crystallized sample. The compression test showed that, due to the existence of crystalline phase, fracture strain of Zr 65 Al10 Ni10 Cu 15 amorphous composites was enhanced from less than 2% to as high as 5.7%, compared with fully amorphous metallic glass. Advisors/Committee Members: Lia Stanciu, David Johnson, John Howarter, Elliott Slamovich.

Subjects/Keywords: Applied sciences; Metallic glass; Materials Science and Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bae, H. (2014). Processing and Characterization of ZR-Based Metallic Glass By Laser Direct Depositon. (Thesis). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/150

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bae, Heehun. “Processing and Characterization of ZR-Based Metallic Glass By Laser Direct Depositon.” 2014. Thesis, Purdue University. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/150.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bae, Heehun. “Processing and Characterization of ZR-Based Metallic Glass By Laser Direct Depositon.” 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Bae H. Processing and Characterization of ZR-Based Metallic Glass By Laser Direct Depositon. [Internet] [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/150.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bae H. Processing and Characterization of ZR-Based Metallic Glass By Laser Direct Depositon. [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2014. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/150

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Rosenberger, Andrew T. Sintering techniques for microstructure control in ceramics.

Degree: PhD, Materials Science, 2015, Purdue University

Sintering techniques can be manipulated to enhance densification in difficult to sinter materials and to produce property enhancing microstructures. However, the interplay between materials, sintering techniques, and end properties is not fully understood in many material systems, and some fundamental aspects of sintering such as the nature of the effects of electric fields remains unknown. The processing property relationships were examined in two classes of materials; zirconium diboride ultra high temperature ceramic composites, and all solid lithium-ion battery phosphate materials. ^ Investigation of zirconium diboride ceramics focused on the effects of zirconium carbide as a secondary or tertiary phase in ZrB2 and ZrB2 – SiC. Addition of zirconium carbide was observed to increase flexural strength of composites up to 590MPa at 50wt% ZrC, significantly higher than the flexural strength of 380MPa observed in similarly prepared ZrB2 – SiC. This difference was attributed to the absence of CTE mismatch induced residual stresses in the ZrB2 – ZrC composites. A high temperature reaction between ZrB2 and TiC producing Zr1-xTixB2 – ZrC composites was discovered and found to enhance densification while reducing the average grain size to as small as 1.4μm, lower than the starting powder size of 1.8μm. While a high flexural strength of 670MPa was observed, a strength dependence on the ZrC grain size indicative of CTE mismatch residual stresses was also seen. Finally, the oxidation and ablation resistance of ZrB2– ZrC – SiC composites as a function of ZrC fraction and ZrC:SiC ratio was investigated. Above 5vol% ZrC, the oxidation and ablation resistance of the composites was significantly reduced due to ZrC oxidation, regardless of SiC content. While ZrC can significantly enhance the mechanical properties of the composite, the volume fraction must be kept low to avoid an undesirable reduction in the oxidation resistance. ^ The influence of applied electrical fields during sintering on microstructure and electronic properties of lithium aluminum titanium phosphate (LATP) electrolyte material was investigated by sintering LATP pellets under DC voltages of 0V, 2V, 10V, and 20V. Application of a DC voltage increased relative density from 86% to a maximum of 95.5%. However, unlike reports on other material systems such as zirconia, a high DC voltage induced, rather than restrained, abnormal grain growth. Conductivity decreased with applied voltage from 4.8*10 -4 S/cm at 0V to 1.3*10-4 S/cm at 20V, which was attributed to the high faceting and poor grain-to-grain contact of the grains sintered under 10V and 20V. This indicates that field-assisted sintering techniques may actually be detrimental to solid state battery materials, and that the field effects are significantly different from those observed in other systems in the literature. Advisors/Committee Members: Lia Stanciu, Lia Stanciu, Elliott Slamovich, Kevin Trumble, Rodney Trice.

Subjects/Keywords: Materials Science and Engineering

…Andrew T. Ph.D., Purdue University, May 2015. Sintering Techniques for Microstructure Control… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rosenberger, A. T. (2015). Sintering techniques for microstructure control in ceramics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/552

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rosenberger, Andrew T. “Sintering techniques for microstructure control in ceramics.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Purdue University. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/552.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rosenberger, Andrew T. “Sintering techniques for microstructure control in ceramics.” 2015. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Rosenberger AT. Sintering techniques for microstructure control in ceramics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Purdue University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/552.

Council of Science Editors:

Rosenberger AT. Sintering techniques for microstructure control in ceramics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Purdue University; 2015. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_dissertations/552

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