Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Purdue University" +contributor:("Glenn Sparks"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Purdue University

1. Sidnam, Emily A. Accessing information and social capital on Facebook: A theoretical and empirical investigation of an accelerated knowledge gap model.

Degree: MA, Communication, 2015, Purdue University

The goal of this thesis is to develop and begin to test a modified knowledge gap model that builds upon the assumptions of the knowledge gap hypothesis, incorporates findings of recent digital divide research and accounts for the unique affordances of new media. This thesis draws upon information behavior and social capital theory and builds off past findings on knowledge and usage gaps in order to develop and explain a knowledge gap model for a new media setting. The traditional knowledge gap hypothesis explains that people of a high socioeconomic status (SES) gain more knowledge from exposure to media messages than people of a low SES, resulting in increasing "gaps" in knowledge after media exposure. This paper argues that differences in the types of ways people use new media (usage) and differences in the connections available to them through new media (social capital) mediate SES's effect on knowledge formation, and that the features of new media like social networking sites (SNSs) can maintain or even facilitate these differences. Thus, usage and social capital variables must be added to the traditional knowledge gap model to make it useful for a new media setting. Particularly, if SES also predicts a usage gap in the use of SNSs to accrue information and social capital, it might predict an accelerated knowledge gap phenomenon in a SNS setting. This thesis tests the accelerated knowledge gap model in a Facebook setting, using multiple regression and mediation analyses to test its hypotheses. The results support a potential causal connection between SES, usage, social capital and knowledge gain. Interestingly, while SES marginally predicted knowledge gain in one model, its effect on knowledge gain was suppressed, because people of a higher SES were less likely to use Facebook for informational purposes. Also, the data revealed a surprising finding that one of the most significant usage gaps may be explained by sex instead of SES, as women are more likely to use Facebook for interaction purposes. This could also inform potential social capital gaps, since interaction usage motivations were significant predictors of both bridging and bonding social capital. Advisors/Committee Members: Sorin Matei, Sorin Matei, Seungyoon Lee, Glenn Sparks.

Subjects/Keywords: Communication

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sidnam, E. A. (2015). Accessing information and social capital on Facebook: A theoretical and empirical investigation of an accelerated knowledge gap model. (Thesis). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/614

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sidnam, Emily A. “Accessing information and social capital on Facebook: A theoretical and empirical investigation of an accelerated knowledge gap model.” 2015. Thesis, Purdue University. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/614.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sidnam, Emily A. “Accessing information and social capital on Facebook: A theoretical and empirical investigation of an accelerated knowledge gap model.” 2015. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Sidnam EA. Accessing information and social capital on Facebook: A theoretical and empirical investigation of an accelerated knowledge gap model. [Internet] [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/614.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sidnam EA. Accessing information and social capital on Facebook: A theoretical and empirical investigation of an accelerated knowledge gap model. [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2015. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/614

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Purdue University

2. Cannon, Julie. Using Construal Level Theory to Promote HPV Vaccine Uptake Among College Males.

Degree: MA, Communication, 2016, Purdue University

College males’ uptake of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination is low. Prior research indicates perceived susceptibility to HPV among college males is also low. Construal level theory may offer a framework to alter perceived susceptibility and intention to vaccinate, but little research has examined this potential. Construal level theory provides foundational elements including that low construal level of perceptions is associated with more proximal psychological distance (hypothetical, social, temporal and spatial). Research indicates a disparity in college males’ susceptibility estimates which suggests high hypothetical distance. A reduction in hypothetical distance should be indicated by a measured increase in perceived susceptibility. Additionally, if construal level primed by messages is consistently associated with stage of change, then movement through stages of change might be promoted by influencing construal level such that perceived hypothetical distance is reduced. Additionally, the impact of interactivity on construal level and associated outcomes was explored. This study included two online experiments. In the first, a message was presented in components based on construal level dimensions. The second experiment was a 2x2, including high construal interactive message, low construal interactive message, high construal non-interactive message, and low construal non-interactive message conditions. The outcome variables of interest in both cases are hypothetical distance, barrier construal, stage of change and intention to vaccinate for HPV. Construal level dimensions did not offer explanatory value to the relationship between barriers and stage of change, a temporal measure of vaccination intention. However, the results indicate that perceptions of messages as lower construal are associated with increases in perceived susceptibility and intention to vaccinate for HPV. Perceived interactivity was associated with reduced social distance and increase in intention to vaccinate. This study suggests that construal level theory may be useful in the formative evaluations for HPV-related campaigns targeting males. This study also supports the addition of interactive elements to health campaigns, however the exact type of interactivity warrants further research. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Hyunyi Cho, Hyunyi Cho, Sorin Matei, Glenn Sparks.

Subjects/Keywords: Communication and the arts; Hpv; Males; Uptake; Vaccine; Communication

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cannon, J. (2016). Using Construal Level Theory to Promote HPV Vaccine Uptake Among College Males. (Thesis). Purdue University. Retrieved from https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/928

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cannon, Julie. “Using Construal Level Theory to Promote HPV Vaccine Uptake Among College Males.” 2016. Thesis, Purdue University. Accessed February 18, 2019. https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/928.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cannon, Julie. “Using Construal Level Theory to Promote HPV Vaccine Uptake Among College Males.” 2016. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Cannon J. Using Construal Level Theory to Promote HPV Vaccine Uptake Among College Males. [Internet] [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2016. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/928.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cannon J. Using Construal Level Theory to Promote HPV Vaccine Uptake Among College Males. [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2016. Available from: https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/928

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.