Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Purdue University" +contributor:("Carl A Behnke"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Purdue University

1. Zhu, Jiaqi. The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior.

Degree: MS, Hospitality and Tourism Management, 2013, Purdue University

Zhu, Jiaqi. M.S., Purdue University, December 2013. The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior. Major Professors: Barbara A. Almanza, Carl A. Behnke. Obesity is a major public health threat. It not only creates challenges for those who are obese and overweight, but also brings an economic burden to the whole society. One important contributing factor for obesity is food eaten away from home, which accounts for more than 40% of American's food budget. Although chain quick-service restaurants are required by law to post calorie information on menus and menu boards, the efficacy of menu labeling for guiding consumers to choose the healthy food items has had mixed results. The purpose of the study was to find the best way to deliver the calorie information to the consumers leading to a change in purchase behavior. Three calorie information delivery methods (simple passive delivery, enhanced passive delivery and combined passive and active delivery) were developed in conjunction with three pairs of healthy and traditional food items. Over a four-week experiment, different delivery methods were applied, and sales and consumer choices were compared to the baseline week. Questionnaires were collected during the three treatment weeks. Ordinal logistic regression, analysis of variance, frequency and means tests were used to analyze the data. Ordinal logistic regression revealed that consumer attitudes towards healthy eating were significant in predicting healthy food item selection. However, the three treatments did not prove to be significant in guiding consumers to choose the healthy food items. Nevertheless, the treatments as a whole led 15% (N=25) of the respondents to change their original purchase intention from the traditional version to the healthy version. Using odds ratio comparison of the sales data, it could be concluded that the combined passive and active delivery methods was the most influential in helping the consumers make a healthy choice, followed by the simple passive delivery and the enhanced passive delivery methods. Apparently, consumers were more influenced if calorie information was delivered in a combined pattern (including passive and active information). Policy makers should consider the effect of other information delivery methods in addition to menus and menu boards in guiding consumers to choose healthy food items. Advisors/Committee Members: Barbara A. Almanza, Carl A. Behnke, Barbara A. Almanza, Carl A. Behnke, Douglas C. Nelson.

Subjects/Keywords: social sciences; obesity; public health; restaurants; information delivery methods; Advertising and Promotion Management; Business Administration, Management, and Operations; Management Sciences and Quantitative Methods; Marketing

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhu, J. (2013). The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior. (Thesis). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/109

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhu, Jiaqi. “The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior.” 2013. Thesis, Purdue University. Accessed February 17, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/109.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhu, Jiaqi. “The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior.” 2013. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Zhu J. The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior. [Internet] [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/109.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zhu J. The Impact of Nutrition Information Delivery Methods on Restaurant Consumers' Attitudes and Behavior. [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2013. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/109

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Purdue University

2. Sun, Xiaodi. Efficacy of Manual Dishwashing and Sanitizer Wiping in Removing Food Soils From Chel Knives.

Degree: MS, Hospitality and Tourism Management, 2014, Purdue University

Improperly cleaned and sanitized chef knives may present a potential contamination risk and thus be a risk for foodborne illness. Therefore, ensuring effective cleaning and sanitization of knife surfaces may help prevent the spread of foodborne pathogens. The primary objective of this research was to compare the efficacies of two different cleaning methods (three-compartment manual dishwashing and sanitizer wiping) at removing food soils from contaminated chef knives using procedures that are typical of restaurant kitchens. Knife wiping and washing procedures were determined and standardized according to an observation of knife cleaning behavior in a kitchen. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence was used to measure the organic soil on knife surfaces after sanitization. This study indicates that the three-compartment manual dishwashing method is more effective at removing food soils from knife surfaces than the sanitizer wiping method (P<0.0001). This study also assessed the influence of other factors on the soil removal efficacies of the two cleaning methods. No significant difference was found between the knife segments (P=0.1856), handle texture (P=0.3486), and type of product cut (P=0.7599) at the 0.05 level. Advisors/Committee Members: Barbara A. Almanza, Carl A. Behnke, Doug Nelson.

Subjects/Keywords: Biological sciences; Health and environmental sciences; Cleanliness; Dishwashing; Knife; Sanitizer wiping; Food Science; Health Policy

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sun, X. (2014). Efficacy of Manual Dishwashing and Sanitizer Wiping in Removing Food Soils From Chel Knives. (Thesis). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/267

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sun, Xiaodi. “Efficacy of Manual Dishwashing and Sanitizer Wiping in Removing Food Soils From Chel Knives.” 2014. Thesis, Purdue University. Accessed February 17, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/267.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sun, Xiaodi. “Efficacy of Manual Dishwashing and Sanitizer Wiping in Removing Food Soils From Chel Knives.” 2014. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Sun X. Efficacy of Manual Dishwashing and Sanitizer Wiping in Removing Food Soils From Chel Knives. [Internet] [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/267.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sun X. Efficacy of Manual Dishwashing and Sanitizer Wiping in Removing Food Soils From Chel Knives. [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2014. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/267

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Purdue University

3. Kim, Gaeul. Consumer inferences of Corporate Social responsibility (CSR) claims on packaged foods.

Degree: MS, Hospitality and Tourism Management, 2015, Purdue University

With the growing public demands in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) of the food industry, CSR claims have begun to appear on food packages, as companies started communicating their CSR initiatives to consumers. Although food packages emerged as an important CSR communication tool, consumers' processing of CSR claims and the effects of these claims on product evaluations still remain unknown. In this regard, the present study carries two important research questions. First, do non-health/nutrition-related CSR claims influence consumers' product evaluations, such as perceived health benefits or tastes? If so, how does the effect of CSR claims differ by type of CSR claims and foods? Second, which specific CSR domain is associated with consumers' evaluations of products and/or company, and ultimately, purchase decisions? Thus, a 4 (no claim vs. three CSR claims) by 2 (food types: essential vs. indulgent) between-subjects factorial experiment was designed to examine the effect of CSR claims on consumer evaluations and related purchase decisions of product and company. With four food items categorized as essential (bread, milk) or indulgent (cookies, ice cream) foods, three domains of CSR claims (eco-friendly packaging, employee welfare, and food manufacturing CSR) were adopted. Results indicated that the packaged foods with food manufacturing CSR claims were perceived to be healthier, more nutritious, and have fewer calories, as compared with the foods with other types of CSR claims. The effect of food manufacturing CSR was reversed in taste perceptions; the foods with such CSR claims were perceived as the least tasty. The foods were perceived as the tastiest when there was the employee welfare CSR claim. Attitudes towards the company were favorable for all CSR claims; however, the employee welfare CSR was most positively perceived, as further supported by qualitative data analysis. All CSR claims were found to increase the intentions to purchase the packaged foods and willingness to pay premium. The findings demonstrate that consumer-oriented CSR (food manufacturing) is associated with product evaluations and consumers' perceived product-related benefits (health), whereas employee-oriented CSR is linked to company evaluations that are transferred to the product attributes (taste). This study also yields important practical implications for food companies and food marketers about CSR message design and communication on packaged foods. Advisors/Committee Members: Li Miao, Li Miao, Carl A Behnke, Barbara Almanza.

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Management Sciences and Quantitative Methods; Marketing; Nutrition; Public Health

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, G. (2015). Consumer inferences of Corporate Social responsibility (CSR) claims on packaged foods. (Thesis). Purdue University. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/484

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Gaeul. “Consumer inferences of Corporate Social responsibility (CSR) claims on packaged foods.” 2015. Thesis, Purdue University. Accessed February 17, 2019. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/484.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Gaeul. “Consumer inferences of Corporate Social responsibility (CSR) claims on packaged foods.” 2015. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Kim G. Consumer inferences of Corporate Social responsibility (CSR) claims on packaged foods. [Internet] [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/484.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kim G. Consumer inferences of Corporate Social responsibility (CSR) claims on packaged foods. [Thesis]. Purdue University; 2015. Available from: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/open_access_theses/484

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.