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You searched for +publisher:"Princeton University" +contributor:("Gregory, Eric S"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Princeton University

1. Clair, Joseph. Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine .

Degree: PhD, 2013, Princeton University

This dissertation explores Augustine's social and political ethics as they appear in a neglected set of illuminating texts: his letters and sermons. The colorful, personal, and practical details found in these writings provide a window into Augustine's moral reasoning not available in his more theoretical treatises. The study focuses on letters and sermons that contain concrete advice on how to prioritize goods in cases of conflict - where an individual must weigh lower and higher goods and prefer the higher - and cases in which an individual's office (e.g. head of household, political magistrate, military commander) and role-specific obligations inform Augustine's advice. The study situates Augustine's classification of goods within the ancient philosophical debate over virtue, goods, and happiness. It also argues that Augustine's theory of goods is unintelligible apart from his adaptation of the Stoic and Peripatetic doctrine of social oikeiōsis, or "social appropriation." This philosophical concept contains the idea that all temporal goods are ultimately necessary for the sake of friendship. The good of friendship unfolds into a series of concentric circles, extending out from the self to the household, political community, and, ultimately, all other human beings and God. Augustine's view of social oikeiōsis involves a conception of society as an integrated complex of roles and practices, and of correspondent virtues. Recognizing this illuminates the tight connection that he posits between one's office and one's responsibility for tending particular temporal goods. A cluster of temporal goods - marriage and family life, public office, and wealth - appears throughout Augustine's letters and sermons, and forms the topics of the central chapters of the study. The dissertation concludes with an examination of Augustine's advice on obtaining eternal goods - the virtues and goods of friendship as they will exist in eternity. Augustine's letters and sermons reveal him bringing his moral-psychological acumen to bear on the problems and decisions faced by his correspondents, and by members of his congregation. These genres provide the right vehicle, and concrete cases provide the right occasions, for his most original and searching reflections on the moral life. Advisors/Committee Members: Gregory, Eric S (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Augustine of Hippo; good; letters; sermons; temporal and eternal goods; the order of love

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clair, J. (2013). Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xs55mc182

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clair, Joseph. “Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine .” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xs55mc182.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clair, Joseph. “Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine .” 2013. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Clair J. Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xs55mc182.

Council of Science Editors:

Clair J. Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2013. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xs55mc182


Princeton University

2. Henreckson, David. The Immortal Commonwealth: Covenant, Law, and the Common Good in Early Modern Protestant Thought .

Degree: PhD, 2016, Princeton University

This dissertation addresses the ways that theological conceptions of covenant and law were applied to political relations and norms in early modern Protestant thought around the turn of the seventeenth century. In broad terms, it asks the question: How would we understand the early modern context differently if we accounted for both the theological and political valence of covenantal thought? While many narratives of modern political history begin either with sixteenth-century reformation theologians like John Calvin and Martin Luther, or with seventeenth-century theorists like Hugo Grotius and Thomas Hobbes, few pay much attention to the decades in between. Yet between the years 1574 and 1614 covenant emerged as a significant and almost ubiquitous concept in both theological and political writings. My project centers on a series of Reformed theologians and jurists – including Theodore Beza, Philippe de Mornay, and Johannes Althusius – who employed theological conceptions of law and covenant to advocate resistance to systemic political injustice. I show how this early modern coordination of theological and political sources and commitments yielded an innovative argument for popular political authority and the collective obligation to resist tyranny. By attending to these important but often-neglected voices, this study uncovers new perspectives on the historical – and normative – relationships between religion and politics, authority and obligation, and the role that covenant has played in shaping intellectual and social history in the modern West. Advisors/Committee Members: Gregory, Eric S (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Covenant; Political theology; Political theory; Reformation; Reformed

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Henreckson, D. (2016). The Immortal Commonwealth: Covenant, Law, and the Common Good in Early Modern Protestant Thought . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01n583xx460

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Henreckson, David. “The Immortal Commonwealth: Covenant, Law, and the Common Good in Early Modern Protestant Thought .” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01n583xx460.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Henreckson, David. “The Immortal Commonwealth: Covenant, Law, and the Common Good in Early Modern Protestant Thought .” 2016. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Henreckson D. The Immortal Commonwealth: Covenant, Law, and the Common Good in Early Modern Protestant Thought . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01n583xx460.

Council of Science Editors:

Henreckson D. The Immortal Commonwealth: Covenant, Law, and the Common Good in Early Modern Protestant Thought . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2016. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01n583xx460

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