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You searched for +publisher:"Princeton University" +contributor:("Gleason, William A"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Princeton University

1. Coghlan, J. Michelle. Revolution's Afterlife: The Paris Commune in American Cultural Memory, 1871-1933 .

Degree: PhD, 2011, Princeton University

Revolution's Afterlife: the Paris Commune in American Cultural Memory, 1871-1933 Revolution's Afterlife traces the uncanny persistence of the Paris Commune – as specter and spectacle – in the U.S. literary and cultural imaginary from the Gilded Age into the Modernist period. Despite, or perhaps because of, the spectacularly transnational traumas of the twentieth century, scholars and theorists have most often regarded cultural memory as a phenomenon of distinctly national (or intra-national) proportions, an ongoing cultural process of remembering or forgetting a nation's own past triumphs or crises. In turn, both the "culture of memory" and the critical turn to memory studies itself have been figured as distinctive to – or symptomatic of – our own historical moment. By contrast, my project uncovers the thoroughly international contours of American cultural memory in the nineteenth century. Recovering the ways Americans represented and consumed the revolution of 1871 across a variety of literary forms and mass-cultural mediums, from illustrated weeklies and touring panoramas to periodical poetry and the novels of Henry James, I argue that the Commune's American afterlife fundamentally shaped anxieties about the New Woman and burgeoning imperial ambitions in the U.S. even as it transformed the terrain of Paris – and what it meant to be an American there – in American memory. Advisors/Committee Members: Gleason, William A (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: 19th-Century American Literature; Gender studies; Memory studies; Paris in American literature; Revolution in literature; Spatial studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coghlan, J. M. (2011). Revolution's Afterlife: The Paris Commune in American Cultural Memory, 1871-1933 . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp012j62s487v

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coghlan, J Michelle. “Revolution's Afterlife: The Paris Commune in American Cultural Memory, 1871-1933 .” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed March 01, 2021. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp012j62s487v.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coghlan, J Michelle. “Revolution's Afterlife: The Paris Commune in American Cultural Memory, 1871-1933 .” 2011. Web. 01 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Coghlan JM. Revolution's Afterlife: The Paris Commune in American Cultural Memory, 1871-1933 . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 01]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp012j62s487v.

Council of Science Editors:

Coghlan JM. Revolution's Afterlife: The Paris Commune in American Cultural Memory, 1871-1933 . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2011. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp012j62s487v


Princeton University

2. Reuland, John Thomas. The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 .

Degree: PhD, 2013, Princeton University

In The Self Unenclosed, I argue that pragmatist ideas of selfhood, action, and futurity guided Progressive Era writers as they pursed an ambitious goal: to expand readers' ability act with a sense of the common, yet to be realized, good in mind. By reimagining the self as an effect of interdependent action, the writers I treat aimed to augment democratic, rational control over institutions and social practices that would otherwise, feared many observes, be left to drift. In particular, I examine how literature reconstructed practices of commemoration, mourning, starting a business, and arranging raced space. Whereas most scholars who write about pragmatism and literature treat pragmatism chiefly as a linguistic and aesthetic strategy or as an antidote to essentialisms, I emphasize pragmatism's history as an aid to social reform. By recovering acts of pragmatist reform, I challenge critical stances that overlook possibilities for creativity that lie within constrained circumstances. After an introduction that lays out how a sense of futurity both structures the actions of the pragmatist social self and makes available a method to write pragmatism's literary history, I show in four chapters how writers changed customarily retrospective acts into opportunities for future-facing action. For Henry James in The American Scene, commemoration at Civil War monuments is marked by an expectancy that James converts into imaginative identification with memorialized Union soldiers as he waits for their ghosts, while William James, in his speech at Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial, turns his audience's eyes away from the past toward a better civic future. In the second chapter, where I account for the strange epistolary friendship of John Dewey and Claude McKay, I claim that McKay's Banjo retropes resilience as a resource to work through loss. Historicizing ways in which pragmatism mutated to suit specific reform projects in my third and fourth chapters, I read Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Forerunner fiction as a form of what I call literary social work. In the final chapter I demonstrate how in Charles S. Johnson's The Negro in Chicago, the Deweyan idea of "adjustment" abetted Chicago's segregated post-riot racial order, and thus I complicate customary associations between pragmatism and anti-racism. Advisors/Committee Members: Fuss, Diana J (advisor), Gleason, William A (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Claude McKay; George Herbert Mead; Henry James; John Dewey; pragmatism and literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reuland, J. T. (2013). The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52j8147

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reuland, John Thomas. “The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 .” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed March 01, 2021. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52j8147.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reuland, John Thomas. “The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 .” 2013. Web. 01 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Reuland JT. The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 01]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52j8147.

Council of Science Editors:

Reuland JT. The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2013. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52j8147


Princeton University

3. Ramachandran, Anitha. Recovering Global Women's Travel Writings from the Modern Period: An Inquiry into Genre and Narrative Agency .

Degree: PhD, 2013, Princeton University

This dissertation focuses on the specific strategies by which authors of the travel writing genre seize narrative agency. Throughout its centuries-long history, the genre of travel writing has offered multiple generations of authors a means by which to convey observations of the real world within the context of a personally meaningful journey, while offering readers access to geographical, cultural, and psychological worlds otherwise inaccessible to them. An ambiguous medium that takes advantage of all the representational and authenticating mechanisms of nonfiction, while never fully abandoning the imaginative privileges of fiction, the genre of the travel narrative interrogates boundaries of form within literary knowledge. Through a detailed exploration of the travel genre's representational strategies and the various uses to which these strategies have been put, this dissertation offers new interpretations and perspectives on this distinctive literary medium of creative and scientific expression. In particular, this study contributes to the critical recovery of under-recognized works by selected women authors. I demonstrate how these authors employ the narrative strategies of the travel writing genre as the vehicle by which to achieve their representational goals in other discourses from which they were excluded, such as policy, law, and anthropology, by virtue of their race, gender, or class. I show how travel writing enabled these women authors to subvert their exclusion from professional and intellectual discourses, and to self-memorialize their contributions to these fields of knowledge. Advisors/Committee Members: Gleason, William A (advisor), Wood, Michael G (advisor).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ramachandran, A. (2013). Recovering Global Women's Travel Writings from the Modern Period: An Inquiry into Genre and Narrative Agency . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xd07gs80p

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramachandran, Anitha. “Recovering Global Women's Travel Writings from the Modern Period: An Inquiry into Genre and Narrative Agency .” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed March 01, 2021. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xd07gs80p.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramachandran, Anitha. “Recovering Global Women's Travel Writings from the Modern Period: An Inquiry into Genre and Narrative Agency .” 2013. Web. 01 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ramachandran A. Recovering Global Women's Travel Writings from the Modern Period: An Inquiry into Genre and Narrative Agency . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 01]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xd07gs80p.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramachandran A. Recovering Global Women's Travel Writings from the Modern Period: An Inquiry into Genre and Narrative Agency . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2013. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xd07gs80p

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