Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Princeton University" +contributor:("Fuss, Diana J"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Princeton University

1. Mahoney, Cate Louise. Go on Your Nerve: Confidence in American Poetry, 1860-1960 .

Degree: PhD, 2020, Princeton University

Go on Your Nerve: Confidence in American Poetry, 1860-1960 investigates confidence in the form and style of three poets from the American Renaissance to the post-45 United States. Confidence can, at turns, mean boldness, trust, or trickery. This dissertation takes “confidence” as a keyword in the poetry of Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and Frank O’Hara, and explores how they implement different aspects of confidence in their writing. By examining how these poets write in confident yet contradictory ways, this project takes a holistic approach to understanding confidence. I argue that confidence is not a theme for these writers but a technique. Chapter One presents Dickinson’s boldness, analyzing her command poems, a vital subset of her work previously unexplored; these poems open with a commanding voice and will their audience into being. Chapter Two situates Frost’s dramatic poetry alongside his lesser known one-act plays, comparing the two genres to see how space is manipulated in both and exposing Frost’s enduring association of writers with confidence-men (and readers as dupes). Chapter Three discusses how O’Hara creates poems that establish corresponding relationships with readers, evoking trust without relying on familiarity. The sites of his poems become safe havens for readers, a place where all are welcome and made to feel like friends. Advisors/Committee Members: Fuss, Diana J (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: confidence; dickinson; frost; o'hara; poetry

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mahoney, C. L. (2020). Go on Your Nerve: Confidence in American Poetry, 1860-1960 . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qf85nf219

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mahoney, Cate Louise. “Go on Your Nerve: Confidence in American Poetry, 1860-1960 .” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed March 01, 2021. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qf85nf219.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mahoney, Cate Louise. “Go on Your Nerve: Confidence in American Poetry, 1860-1960 .” 2020. Web. 01 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Mahoney CL. Go on Your Nerve: Confidence in American Poetry, 1860-1960 . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 01]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qf85nf219.

Council of Science Editors:

Mahoney CL. Go on Your Nerve: Confidence in American Poetry, 1860-1960 . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2020. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qf85nf219


Princeton University

2. Calver, Harriet. Modern Fiction and its Phantoms .

Degree: PhD, 2017, Princeton University

The fiction of the turn of the twentieth century is driven by the nonhuman. Characters and narrators alike are ousted by things, animals, environments, and all manner of inhuman otherness. Modern Fiction and its Phantoms reads the novels of Virginia Woolf and Dorothy Richardson alongside ghost stories by M. R. James, Vernon Lee, and others, in order to explore how this autonomous world creeps close to the self. We recall the kitchen table Lily fails to picture when she is "not there" in To The Lighthouse. Lily can only summon a table which is as much entangled with her imagination as with a pear tree. A beyond-human reality is imperceptible, un-writeable. Yet I wish to highlight a notable aspect of such characteristic modern apophasis: that radical alterity is frequently illegible not because it is inaccessible to signs but because it is in league with signs. Alterity dwells in, and usurps us through, the processes and structures of fiction. It is lively; coalescing in the voice, the momentum, the meaning-making devices of fiction. It arises, disconcertingly, out of all that seems most human about narrative. The conspiratorial collusion between the nonhuman and the symbolic is something we should all recognise from the ghost story. Indeed, metaleptic horror stories about documents coming to life peaked as the nineteenth century edged into the twentieth. But that phantasmal relationship is also distinctly present in domestic, modernist novels. These are narratives in which signifiers share an eerie proximity with signifieds and symbolic worlds collapse into real worlds. On the one hand, this is a form of extreme mimeticism (the realist tradition is visible here, as it was inherited and distorted). But it can also be understood as a particular strain of modern abstraction, in which literary style is understood as a stronghold of otherness, and in which the individual is not so much alienated by an inhospitable world but rather, through this aesthetic intimacy, brought into sudden contact with it. The fiction of the turn of the twentieth century in Britain was haunted by a relentless realism. Advisors/Committee Members: DiBattista, Maria (advisor), Fuss, Diana J (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Ghosts; Literary style; Modernism; Narrative; Nonhumans; Realism

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Calver, H. (2017). Modern Fiction and its Phantoms . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01js956j322

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Calver, Harriet. “Modern Fiction and its Phantoms .” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed March 01, 2021. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01js956j322.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Calver, Harriet. “Modern Fiction and its Phantoms .” 2017. Web. 01 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Calver H. Modern Fiction and its Phantoms . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 01]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01js956j322.

Council of Science Editors:

Calver H. Modern Fiction and its Phantoms . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2017. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01js956j322


Princeton University

3. Reuland, John Thomas. The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 .

Degree: PhD, 2013, Princeton University

In The Self Unenclosed, I argue that pragmatist ideas of selfhood, action, and futurity guided Progressive Era writers as they pursed an ambitious goal: to expand readers' ability act with a sense of the common, yet to be realized, good in mind. By reimagining the self as an effect of interdependent action, the writers I treat aimed to augment democratic, rational control over institutions and social practices that would otherwise, feared many observes, be left to drift. In particular, I examine how literature reconstructed practices of commemoration, mourning, starting a business, and arranging raced space. Whereas most scholars who write about pragmatism and literature treat pragmatism chiefly as a linguistic and aesthetic strategy or as an antidote to essentialisms, I emphasize pragmatism's history as an aid to social reform. By recovering acts of pragmatist reform, I challenge critical stances that overlook possibilities for creativity that lie within constrained circumstances. After an introduction that lays out how a sense of futurity both structures the actions of the pragmatist social self and makes available a method to write pragmatism's literary history, I show in four chapters how writers changed customarily retrospective acts into opportunities for future-facing action. For Henry James in The American Scene, commemoration at Civil War monuments is marked by an expectancy that James converts into imaginative identification with memorialized Union soldiers as he waits for their ghosts, while William James, in his speech at Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial, turns his audience's eyes away from the past toward a better civic future. In the second chapter, where I account for the strange epistolary friendship of John Dewey and Claude McKay, I claim that McKay's Banjo retropes resilience as a resource to work through loss. Historicizing ways in which pragmatism mutated to suit specific reform projects in my third and fourth chapters, I read Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Forerunner fiction as a form of what I call literary social work. In the final chapter I demonstrate how in Charles S. Johnson's The Negro in Chicago, the Deweyan idea of "adjustment" abetted Chicago's segregated post-riot racial order, and thus I complicate customary associations between pragmatism and anti-racism. Advisors/Committee Members: Fuss, Diana J (advisor), Gleason, William A (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Claude McKay; George Herbert Mead; Henry James; John Dewey; pragmatism and literature

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reuland, J. T. (2013). The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52j8147

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reuland, John Thomas. “The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 .” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed March 01, 2021. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52j8147.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reuland, John Thomas. “The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 .” 2013. Web. 01 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Reuland JT. The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 01]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52j8147.

Council of Science Editors:

Reuland JT. The Self Unenclosed: A New Literary History of Pragmatism, 1890-1940 . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2013. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52j8147

.