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You searched for +publisher:"Portland State University" +contributor:("Sharon Carstens"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Portland State University

1. Fortier, Brad. Long Form Improvisation - Creating Spontaneous Communities Through Collaborative Comedic Performance.

Degree: MAIS, Interdisciplinary Studies, 2008, Portland State University

Improvisational theater can tell us much about the driving social and cultural forces behind collaboration and collective constructions of reality, as well as the sorts of behaviors and practices that bolster their efficacy. The collaboration of the performers on generating a comedic piece of theater spontaneously from audience suggestions in a long improvisation creates a sense of what Victor Turner called communitas for the performers. That phenomenon can create a larger sense of socio-emotional unity between the audience and performers. Turning an anthropological lens on comedy theater, this presentation explores the performer-audience dynamic and its impact on the success of an improvised comedic performance. Research was conducted through an ethnography of improvisational acting troupes and their audiences in Rochester, New York, and presents a series of unique situated references that help delineate a social bond between the audience and performers, or a "micro" version of what Gary Allan Fine and Michaela DeSoucey term a "joking culture." Advisors/Committee Members: Sharon Carstens.

Subjects/Keywords: Improvisation (Acting); Comedy  – Social aspects

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APA (6th Edition):

Fortier, B. (2008). Long Form Improvisation - Creating Spontaneous Communities Through Collaborative Comedic Performance. (Masters Thesis). Portland State University. Retrieved from http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/32

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fortier, Brad. “Long Form Improvisation - Creating Spontaneous Communities Through Collaborative Comedic Performance.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Portland State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/32.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fortier, Brad. “Long Form Improvisation - Creating Spontaneous Communities Through Collaborative Comedic Performance.” 2008. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Fortier B. Long Form Improvisation - Creating Spontaneous Communities Through Collaborative Comedic Performance. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Portland State University; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/32.

Council of Science Editors:

Fortier B. Long Form Improvisation - Creating Spontaneous Communities Through Collaborative Comedic Performance. [Masters Thesis]. Portland State University; 2008. Available from: http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/32

2. Sweeney, Philip John. Taiwanese Language Medical School Curriculum: A Case Study of Symbolic Resistance Through The Promotion of Alternative Literacy and Language Domain Norms.

Degree: MS(M.S.) in Anthropology, Anthropology, 2013, Portland State University

In contemporary Taiwan, Mandarin language proficiency and literacy in Han characters are not only key skills needed for success in academic institutions and employment markets, but they also carry meaning as symbolic markers of national and supranational Chinese identity. This study examines how Taiwanese-language medical studies curriculum planners are promoting alternative linguistic practices as a means of resisting the influence of Chinese nationalism in Taiwan and striving to replace it with a rival Taiwanese nationalism. I conducted research for this study during the 2010-2011 school year in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. I collected data for this study by engaging in participant observation research at Taiwanese-language curriculum-editing meetings; auditing Taiwanese-language courses at Kaohsiung Medical University; and conducting interviews with both curriculum planners and students at KMU. The role of official languages, literacy, and historical narratives are examined as symbolic components of a Chinese nationalist hegemony, which was constructed through the policies of the Kuomintang's Republic of China administration in post-war Taiwan. This study also examines the relationship between occupation, language skills, and national identification in the context of the contemporary Greater China regional economy. The curriculum planners who are the subjects of this study are employed in the field of medical care, where Taiwanese language skills are valued resources for communicating with patients from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds. In addition, medical doctors have historically been vocal opponents of the Kuomintang administration's pro-Chinese nationalist policies. Therefore, this case study illustrates how the curriculum planners' occupations and language practices are utilized as resources in their efforts to foster Taiwanese autonomy in the Greater China region. This study also examines current limits to the effectiveness of language preservation and revitalization policies in Taiwan due to the importance of Mandarin-language literacy in the majority of high-status occupations in Greater China and to changing conceptions of the relationship between language practice and national identity. This study contributes to the fields of linguistic anthropology and Asian studies by examining relationships between nationalism, employment, language practice, and literacy in the context of Taiwan's ambiguous status as a national entity. It also analyzes ways in which language practices and literacy forms are created and modified as strategic acts to both identify people with competing nationalisms and allow them access to employment opportunities in the context of shifting administrative and economic power structures in the Greater China region. Advisors/Committee Members: Sharon Carstens.

Subjects/Keywords: Mandarin dialects  – Taiwan; Nationalism  – Taiwan; Anthropological linguistics  – Taiwan; Taiwanese  – Social aspects; Anthropology; Chinese Studies; Modern Languages

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APA (6th Edition):

Sweeney, P. J. (2013). Taiwanese Language Medical School Curriculum: A Case Study of Symbolic Resistance Through The Promotion of Alternative Literacy and Language Domain Norms. (Masters Thesis). Portland State University. Retrieved from http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/938

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sweeney, Philip John. “Taiwanese Language Medical School Curriculum: A Case Study of Symbolic Resistance Through The Promotion of Alternative Literacy and Language Domain Norms.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Portland State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/938.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sweeney, Philip John. “Taiwanese Language Medical School Curriculum: A Case Study of Symbolic Resistance Through The Promotion of Alternative Literacy and Language Domain Norms.” 2013. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Sweeney PJ. Taiwanese Language Medical School Curriculum: A Case Study of Symbolic Resistance Through The Promotion of Alternative Literacy and Language Domain Norms. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Portland State University; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/938.

Council of Science Editors:

Sweeney PJ. Taiwanese Language Medical School Curriculum: A Case Study of Symbolic Resistance Through The Promotion of Alternative Literacy and Language Domain Norms. [Masters Thesis]. Portland State University; 2013. Available from: http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/938


Portland State University

3. Cannon, Janet Bennion. An exploratory study of female networking in a Mormon fundamentalist polygynous society.

Degree: MA, Anthropology, 1990, Portland State University

The present study is comprised of two parts: 1) an exploratory ethnography of a contemporary polygynous community governed by a strong patriarchal ideology in Pinesdale Montana with emphasis on social relationships, and 2) an analysis of the factors which have allowed women's groups to develop in Mormon fundamentalism. The ethnographic account of the community contextualizes the occurrence of female groups in Pinesdale. A model of the formation of female groups designed by Nancy Leis (1974) in her study of the West African Ijaw is used to provide a better understanding of how female groups are formed, and is applied to the Pinesdale community. This model suggests that the combination of features relevant to the occurrence of female groups are virilocality, patrilineality, polygyny, and economic independence. In spite of the kin-based nature of her African study, which limits its applicability to Western society, Leis suggests that her model "would predict the presence or absence of women's groups elsewhere," and encourages a cross-cultural study to prove her hypothesis. My thesis investigates the strengths and limitations of Leis' model within an ethnographic framework. Advisors/Committee Members: Sharon Carstens.

Subjects/Keywords: Mormon women  – Social networks  – Montana  – Pinesdale; Polygamy  – Montana  – Pinesdale; Pinesdale (Mont.)  – Social life and customs; Mormon Studies; Social and Cultural Anthropology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cannon, J. B. (1990). An exploratory study of female networking in a Mormon fundamentalist polygynous society. (Masters Thesis). Portland State University. Retrieved from https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4025

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cannon, Janet Bennion. “An exploratory study of female networking in a Mormon fundamentalist polygynous society.” 1990. Masters Thesis, Portland State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4025.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cannon, Janet Bennion. “An exploratory study of female networking in a Mormon fundamentalist polygynous society.” 1990. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Cannon JB. An exploratory study of female networking in a Mormon fundamentalist polygynous society. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Portland State University; 1990. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4025.

Council of Science Editors:

Cannon JB. An exploratory study of female networking in a Mormon fundamentalist polygynous society. [Masters Thesis]. Portland State University; 1990. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4025

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