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You searched for +publisher:"Portland State University" +contributor:("Christopher Shortell"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Portland State University

1. Dzeguze, Andrew Bryan. Exploring District Judges' Decision Making in the Context of Admitting Expert Testimony.

Degree: PhD, Public Affairs and Policy, 2018, Portland State University

Over the last several decades, multiple schools of thought have emerged regarding what impacts judicial decision making. In contrast to the classic legal model, studies have argued alternatively that judges are policy actors who rule consistent with their political attitudes; that behavioral traits such as race, gender and socialization influence judicial conduct, both consciously and unconsciously; that whatever policy interests judges may have, these are moderated by institutional constraints and strategic considerations; and that judges are subject to some common cognitive shortcuts in decision making, although they may be moderated or present differently than in the general population in light of their training and experience. Most of these studies, particularly in political science, have tended to focus on Supreme Court or appellate decisions on politically salient subject matter such as the scope of the Fourth Amendment or racial discrimination. The cognitive studies, by comparison, have primarily used experimental conduct, often with artificially extreme variations between legal and factual issues to assess the impact of legal training. Other than field review articles, most have focused on a single potential explanatory variable such as ideology, gender or legal training. To date, there has been very limited study of the more routine tasks judges engage in at the trial court level such as pre-trial evidentiary rulings or comparative assessments of the relative explanatory power of factors drawn from multiple approaches to decision making. The present study involved both a qualitative and quantitative assessment of Federal district court decisions on the admissibility of expert witnesses. Employing thematic analysis of all cases involving a substantive analysis of this issue from 2010-2015 in nine district courts, a default pattern emerged that judges are reluctant to exclude experts except in extreme cases. Moreover, judges appear to have adopted several practices consistent with minimizing the cognitive burden of decision making. These findings suggest that judges are acting consistently with legal norms and the broad outlines of legal precedent, but in a manner which may lead to sub-optimal outcomes in some circumstances. Quantitative analysis of the same data suggests that judges are subject to a variety of significant influences including legal precepts, political ideology and cognitive heuristics in different settings. Moreover, the influence of issues such as ideology appear to be associated with some courts and not others, with circuit level precedent being the most obvious intervening factor to explain the difference. The circuit level impacts on behavior and several other findings in this study suggest that much more nuance is present than is normally acknowledged in the study of judicial decision making. The results of this study also suggest policy makers should account for cognitive tendencies in crafting legal standards and precedents as well as legal education. Finally,… Advisors/Committee Members: Christopher Shortell.

Subjects/Keywords: Judicial process; Administration of justice  – Decision making; Expert evidence; Law; Legal Studies; Political Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dzeguze, A. B. (2018). Exploring District Judges' Decision Making in the Context of Admitting Expert Testimony. (Doctoral Dissertation). Portland State University. Retrieved from https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4392

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dzeguze, Andrew Bryan. “Exploring District Judges' Decision Making in the Context of Admitting Expert Testimony.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Portland State University. Accessed March 19, 2019. https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4392.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dzeguze, Andrew Bryan. “Exploring District Judges' Decision Making in the Context of Admitting Expert Testimony.” 2018. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Dzeguze AB. Exploring District Judges' Decision Making in the Context of Admitting Expert Testimony. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Portland State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4392.

Council of Science Editors:

Dzeguze AB. Exploring District Judges' Decision Making in the Context of Admitting Expert Testimony. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Portland State University; 2018. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4392


Portland State University

2. Curry, Kevin Everett. Politics in the Social Media Era: The Relationship Between Social Media Use and Political Participation During the 2016 United States Presidential Election.

Degree: PhD, Public Affairs and Policy, 2018, Portland State University

The growth of social media use raises significant questions related to political information and its effect on political knowledge and participation. One issue is whether social media delivers news and political information in a similar manner as traditional news media sources, like newspapers, TV, and radio, by contributing to political knowledge, which is linked to voter turnout. This dissertation examines the relationship between an individual's social media use, their use of traditional news media sources, and whether they turn out to vote. It utilizes American National Election Survey data from the 2016 U.S. Presidential election to complete three studies. First, the dissertation compares people who prefer social media and those who prefer traditional news media sources across as series of political habits and attitudes. Second, it looks at the expansion of the media environment and examines whether a person's social media use and preference for news or entertainment is related to political knowledge and voter participation. Finally, this dissertations examines at whether social media use increases the odds an individual will turn out to vote, thus acting in a similar manner as traditional news media. The results identify differences between people who prefer social media and people who prefer traditional news media sources. In particular, people who prefer social media tend to be younger, have less political knowledge, and have a lower voter turnout rate. However, unlike traditional news media use, the use of social media did not increase the odds an individual turned out to vote in 2016. Further, the use of social media and an individual's content preference of entertainment versus news was not related to political knowledge nor voter turnout. While social media does not appear to have a positive relationship with turnout, it does not appear to discourage a person from voting either. The results suggest that more work needs to be done, including examining the relationship between age, social media use and turnout, as well as how content length may be related to political participation. Finally, further examination is needed of the possible indirect ways social media may be related to voter attitudes and participation. Advisors/Committee Members: Christopher Shortell.

Subjects/Keywords: Public Affairs; Public Policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Curry, K. E. (2018). Politics in the Social Media Era: The Relationship Between Social Media Use and Political Participation During the 2016 United States Presidential Election. (Doctoral Dissertation). Portland State University. Retrieved from https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4506

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Curry, Kevin Everett. “Politics in the Social Media Era: The Relationship Between Social Media Use and Political Participation During the 2016 United States Presidential Election.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Portland State University. Accessed March 19, 2019. https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4506.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Curry, Kevin Everett. “Politics in the Social Media Era: The Relationship Between Social Media Use and Political Participation During the 2016 United States Presidential Election.” 2018. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Curry KE. Politics in the Social Media Era: The Relationship Between Social Media Use and Political Participation During the 2016 United States Presidential Election. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Portland State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4506.

Council of Science Editors:

Curry KE. Politics in the Social Media Era: The Relationship Between Social Media Use and Political Participation During the 2016 United States Presidential Election. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Portland State University; 2018. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4506

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