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You searched for +publisher:"Portland State University" +contributor:("Beverly Fuller"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Portland State University

1. Fowke, Robert Andrew. Performance Measures for Managerial Decision Making: Performance Measurement Synergies in Multi-Attribute Performance Measurement Systems.

Degree: PhD, Systems Science, 2010, Portland State University

This research tests for correlation between corporate performance and use of financial measures, nonfinancial measures, and number of balanced scorecard categories used. Literature notes a preference for managing by nonfinancial measures because financial measures are lagging indicators, but little empirical evidence is available on the relationship between nonfinancial measures and financial performance, and few companies are found to realize the benefits of nonfinancial measurements. The balanced scorecard has been studied to find the impact of diversity of performance measures, and anecdotal improvements have been reported, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence regarding how the use of a balanced scorecard impacts organizational performance. These issues are investigated in this research with a web based survey distributed to a sample of publicly traded companies using a systematic selection process based on randomly selected numbers generated for each 3-digit NAICS category. The dependent variable is a rank of high, medium or low performance based on 12-month rolling average stock price comparisons from January 2005 to January 2009. These averages are analyzed as a percent change for each company, with performance standardized by 3-digit NAICS category to eliminate cross industry variance in performance ranking. Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA is used to test for correlation. High performers show greatest utilization of both financial and nonfinancial measures, followed by medium performers, with low performers utilizing both measures the least. Nonfinancial performance measures are more correlated to firm value than financial measures with the high performers' mean score for nonfinancial measures being higher than for financial measures. By contrast, medium and low performers exhibit the opposite: higher mean scores for financial measures than for nonfinancial measures [p ≤ 0.05 for nonfinancial measures and p ≤ 0.1 for financial measures]. Correlation is found to be borderline significant (p = 0.06) for the number of balanced scorecard categories used with high performers utilizing the highest number of categories and low performers utilizing the lowest number of categories [p = 0.009 with inclusion of two respondents reporting no usage of balanced scorecard categories]. Advisors/Committee Members: Beverly Fuller.

Subjects/Keywords: Organizational effectiveness  – Measurement; Management  – Evaluation; Decision making  – Evaluation; Performance  – Measurement

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fowke, R. A. (2010). Performance Measures for Managerial Decision Making: Performance Measurement Synergies in Multi-Attribute Performance Measurement Systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). Portland State University. Retrieved from https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/164

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fowke, Robert Andrew. “Performance Measures for Managerial Decision Making: Performance Measurement Synergies in Multi-Attribute Performance Measurement Systems.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Portland State University. Accessed November 12, 2019. https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/164.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fowke, Robert Andrew. “Performance Measures for Managerial Decision Making: Performance Measurement Synergies in Multi-Attribute Performance Measurement Systems.” 2010. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Fowke RA. Performance Measures for Managerial Decision Making: Performance Measurement Synergies in Multi-Attribute Performance Measurement Systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Portland State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/164.

Council of Science Editors:

Fowke RA. Performance Measures for Managerial Decision Making: Performance Measurement Synergies in Multi-Attribute Performance Measurement Systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Portland State University; 2010. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/164


Portland State University

2. O'Connell, Michael Thomas. Closed Loop Satisfaction Measurement: New Wine from Old Bottles.

Degree: PhD, Systems Science: Business Administration, 2011, Portland State University

A field experiment examines within a financial services firm the impact of a customer satisfaction survey-based intervention that enables front-line employees to identify and contact less-than satisfied customers (less than 9 on a 10-point scale) to proactively prevent potential customer defections. The impact is measured using operational data from 28,000 new customers and their associated defection behavior over a period of eight years. The experiment applies binomial Z-tests of proportions to assess the difference in defection rates of targeted and non-targeted customers before and after the intervention. The research finds that the use of closed loop satisfaction measurement reduces customer defections (by 40%, p>.001). Further, the research finds that the primary reduction is for non-targeted customers rather than for targeted customers, contrary to expectations. The research also provides additional support for the 'service recovery paradox' wherein customers who are less-than satisfied who are satisfactorily resolved have reduced defection rates compared to customers that are satisfied (by 47%, p=.016). The primary limitation of the research is its reliance on data from a single company. Another limitation is the potentially confounding impact of the Great Recession on defections during the study period, which could threaten the validity of the analysis. Consequently, additional tests were performed to control for this and other potentially confounding factors. These tests show that the Great Recession and the host company's cost cutting reactions did impact defections and therefore data from these periods were eliminated from the analyses. The primary theoretical contributions are the use of actual customer defections to measure the impacts and the use of a proactive rather than a reactive intervention. The contribution from a practitioner perspective is the relatively low cost of this intervention for improving customer retention. Advisors/Committee Members: Beverly Fuller.

Subjects/Keywords: Closed loop satisfaction measurement; Service recovery; Customer loyalty; Customer relationship management; Customer retention; Scientific surveys; Consumer satisfaction  – Research; Customer relations; Customer services  – Evaluation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

O'Connell, M. T. (2011). Closed Loop Satisfaction Measurement: New Wine from Old Bottles. (Doctoral Dissertation). Portland State University. Retrieved from https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/221

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

O'Connell, Michael Thomas. “Closed Loop Satisfaction Measurement: New Wine from Old Bottles.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Portland State University. Accessed November 12, 2019. https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/221.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

O'Connell, Michael Thomas. “Closed Loop Satisfaction Measurement: New Wine from Old Bottles.” 2011. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

O'Connell MT. Closed Loop Satisfaction Measurement: New Wine from Old Bottles. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Portland State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/221.

Council of Science Editors:

O'Connell MT. Closed Loop Satisfaction Measurement: New Wine from Old Bottles. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Portland State University; 2011. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/221

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