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You searched for +publisher:"Penn State University" +contributor:("Stephanie Stockar, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Penn State University

1. Mishra, Partha Pratim. ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-BALANCING PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS.

Degree: 2018, Penn State University

This dissertation examines the problem of integrating lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries and photovoltaic (PV) cells in modern solar farms. Rapid growth in the global solar power generation has made battery energy storage integration increasingly important for PV farms in order to accommodate generation intermittency. One critical challenge is that extensive power electronics are needed in these integrated power systems to achieve functionalities such as battery pack balancing and PV maximum power point tracking (MPPT). This dissertation examines the degree to which such functionalities in integrated PV-battery systems can be achieved automatically through novel system designs. In particular, the dissertation develops integration topologies that allow solar farm battery packs to achieve cell-to-cell charge equalization purely by design, eliminating the need for active balancing via power electronics. This synergistic behavior is termed self-balancing. Moreover, one can adjust the relative sizing of the battery cells and photovoltaics in this integration topology in order to achieve rapid MPPT by design, again without requiring active power electronics. Specifically, this dissertation proposes two “hybrid” topologies for integrating PV and battery cells, both of which connect PV generation to each battery cell directly, with or without intermediate power conversion. Furthermore, using Lyapunov stability methods, this dissertation proves that both topologies are globally, asymptotically self-balancing. This means that initial differences among battery cells in either state of charge (SOC) or other internal state variables are guaranteed to diminish asymptotically with time. This reduces the amount and hence the cost of power electronics, otherwise needed for cell balancing in solar farm battery packs. The Lyapunov candidate function used for the stability analysis represents a measure of the “rise in energy” when the system becomes imbalanced compared to a balanced state. Linearization of the system dynamics around an equilibrium value furnishes an analytic expression for self-balancing time constant. Using this time constant and equilibrium conditions for the system dynamics, this dissertation identifies two sets of system properties, one set that only affects the self-balancing speed and the other that can affect both the speed and the equilibrium location. Such analysis further elucidates the impact of various system heterogeneities on the self-balancing behavior. Additionally, through a small-signal analysis, this dissertation shows that the self-balancing topology without power conversion can also achieve rapid MPPT passively under varying solar irradiation levels, that is, without using active MPPT control. Model-based analysis of the passive MPPT behavior leads to the derivation of analytic design rules for passive MPPT-capable systems, development of dynamic models for possible departure of the system from MPP over time, and identification of system parameters influencing the passive MPPT behavior. This… Advisors/Committee Members: Hosam Kadry Fathy, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Hosam Kadry Fathy, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Christopher Rahn, Committee Member, Stephanie Stockar, Committee Member, Nilanjan Ray Chaudhuri, Outside Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Self-Balancing Systems; Maximum Power Point Tracking; Extremum-Seeking; Lyapunov Methods; Controls; Model-based Estimation; Renewable Energy Systems; Lithium-ion Batteries; State Estimation; Input Estimation; Model Reduction; Stability; Hardware-in-the-loop Simulation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mishra, P. P. (2018). ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-BALANCING PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/15292ppm114

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mishra, Partha Pratim. “ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-BALANCING PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS.” 2018. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 19, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/15292ppm114.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mishra, Partha Pratim. “ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-BALANCING PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS.” 2018. Web. 19 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Mishra PP. ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-BALANCING PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 19]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/15292ppm114.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mishra PP. ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-BALANCING PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2018. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/15292ppm114

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. Wahba, Mohamed. Factors affecting the repeatability of the fuel consumption of a heavy-duty truck on urban and highway roads.

Degree: 2019, Penn State University

Trends in vehicle control show an increasing reliance on data aggregation and model-based predictive control to improve vehicle performance. The data and models that underly this trend, when analyzed experimentally on-the-road, allow discovery of route and location-specific effects that are not typically captured with generic vehicle or road representations. The influence of these effects on the performance, fuel economy, and stability of vehicle systems - particularly heavy vehicles used individually or in platoons - is poorly understood. This thesis examines the location-specific variations and influences that affect the performance in terms of fuel economy of heavy-duty trucks in urban and highway routes. The methods are motivated by experimental data collection from large numbers of repeated route traversals, with data including vehicle position, speed, acceleration, fuel use as well as drag reduction for following trucks in the case of platooning. These measurements allow the dynamic fuel consumption to be matched as a function of distance along the route as measured in a spatial s-coordinate. Testing situations include conventional single-vehicle operation across a wide range of urban, arterial, and highway situations, as well as the platooning of two trucks on an interstate highway. The results demonstrate that terrain and position information within a route offer significant predictions in terms of fuel economy in a vehicle. Additionally, infrastructure elements, specifically vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication can be used not only to monitor route information, but also used by the infrastructure to constrain or define behaviors of the vehicle. Moreover, the geometric definition of a road was seen to change the behavior of the stability of a truck platoon. Also, the drag reduction experienced by truck platoon is quantified using wind-tunnel experiments. Afterwards, a framework is proposed where the number of route traversals needed to define a route in terms of fuel use and vehicle speed is obtained based on statistical confidence. Finally, two commercial Volvo trucks are used to obtain location-specific fuel consumption and drag estimates when undergoing a fixed gap-distance in a truck platoon on Interstate-99. When the inter-vehicle platoon spacing was fixed to a one vehicle length, the fuel consumption reduction had a per-route average improvement of 13.6% on one route, and 9.1% on another route. Advisors/Committee Members: Sean Brennan, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Sean N Brennan, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Hosam Kadry Fathy, Committee Member, Stephanie Stockar, Committee Member, Eric Norman Johnson, Outside Member, Karen Ann Thole, Program Head/Chair.

Subjects/Keywords: V2I; Truck platoon

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wahba, M. (2019). Factors affecting the repeatability of the fuel consumption of a heavy-duty truck on urban and highway roads. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/16464mhw128

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wahba, Mohamed. “Factors affecting the repeatability of the fuel consumption of a heavy-duty truck on urban and highway roads.” 2019. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 19, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/16464mhw128.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wahba, Mohamed. “Factors affecting the repeatability of the fuel consumption of a heavy-duty truck on urban and highway roads.” 2019. Web. 19 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Wahba M. Factors affecting the repeatability of the fuel consumption of a heavy-duty truck on urban and highway roads. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 19]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/16464mhw128.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wahba M. Factors affecting the repeatability of the fuel consumption of a heavy-duty truck on urban and highway roads. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2019. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/16464mhw128

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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