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You searched for +publisher:"Penn State University" +contributor:("Krista M Wilkinson, Committee Chair/Co-Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Penn State University

1. Thistle, Jennifer J. Effects of symbol arrangement and background color cues on reaction time and accuracy: Implications for AAC design for young children.

Degree: 2014, Penn State University

Children who are unable to use spoken language to meet their communication needs often benefit from aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The design of the visual display may influence the ability of the child to communicate effectively. A display that supports efficient visual processing may facilitate success, whereas a display that is not optimal may create unintended barriers to success. However, there is limited evidence guiding clinical decision-making regarding visual display design. This is especially true regarding clinical practices targeted at supporting syntactically correct multi-symbol constructions. Clinicians often arrange symbols in groupings by part of speech as well as color-code the symbol background. In order to address this research to practice gap, the current study implemented a 2 x 2 factorial design to investigate the influence of symbol arrangement and background color on response time and task accuracy. The experiment measured the response time and accuracy of children with typical development, ages 3 ½ to 7 years as they used symbols to repeat spoken sentences. Participants received an auditory-visual stimulus (e.g., spoken sentence matching a photograph) and then touched the symbols within a 4 x 4 array that represented the stimuli. The participants completed the task across four conditions that varied the presence and absence of symbol arrangement and background color. A grammaticality judgment task assessed participants’ metalinguistic awareness to determine if this skill moderated the relationship between the features and outcome measures. Symbol arrangement influenced responding, in the participants under age 5. These participants were faster and more accurate when using displays that had symbol arrangement than when using displays that did not have symbol arrangement. Additionally, individual level analyses illustrated the younger participants (under age 5) were on average 4.3 seconds faster when using displays with symbol arrangement as opposed to no symbol arrangement. As a group, younger participants demonstrated greater accuracy when symbols had a white background compared to colored background. Children over 5 years old demonstrated no effects of symbol arrangement or background color. This dissertation discusses the results, theoretical implications, clinical implications, and directions for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Krista M Wilkinson, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Krista M Wilkinson, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Janice Catherine Light, Committee Member, Carol Anne Miller, Committee Member, David Brent Mcnaughton, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Augmentative and alternative communication; background color; symbol arrangement; visual search; children; AAC display design

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thistle, J. J. (2014). Effects of symbol arrangement and background color cues on reaction time and accuracy: Implications for AAC design for young children. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/22381

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thistle, Jennifer J. “Effects of symbol arrangement and background color cues on reaction time and accuracy: Implications for AAC design for young children.” 2014. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed January 20, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/22381.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thistle, Jennifer J. “Effects of symbol arrangement and background color cues on reaction time and accuracy: Implications for AAC design for young children.” 2014. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Thistle JJ. Effects of symbol arrangement and background color cues on reaction time and accuracy: Implications for AAC design for young children. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/22381.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Thistle JJ. Effects of symbol arrangement and background color cues on reaction time and accuracy: Implications for AAC design for young children. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2014. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/22381

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. O'Neill, Tara Anne. Perspectives of Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy on the Supports, Challenges, and Realities of Integrating AAC into Everyday Life.

Degree: 2018, Penn State University

In order to ensure long-term adoption and use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technologies, they must be designed to support children to participate within everyday activities and routines that are prioritized by families. Nine parents of children with cerebral palsy who used AAC technologies participated in semi-structured interviews to provide their perspectives of how AAC technologies were integrated into the functional contexts of everyday life. Five major themes emerged from the discussions: (a) integrating AAC into life, (b) AAC technologies, (c) child needs and skills, (d) parent responsibilities and priorities, and (e) AAC process and decision-making. Children were able to use AAC technologies within a variety of everyday contexts with various partners; however, challenges included access to AAC within physical and outdoor activities and partners who lacked knowledge regarding operational competencies and effective interaction strategies. In order to integrate AAC technologies into life, parents prioritized technology features including ease of programming, improved physical design (e.g., lighter, wearable, easy to mount, durable), features to enhance efficiency and ease of access (e.g., brain-computer interface, sentence prediction), and availably of multiple functions and features (e.g., facial recognition software, augmented reality, projection capabilities, capability to control wheelchair). AAC manufacturers and mainstream technology developers should work to ensure that technologies are responsive to the supports, limitations, and ideal features identified by parents. Future research should seek input from a larger group of stakeholders and use longitudinal methods to examine perceptions of AAC technologies over time. Advisors/Committee Members: Krista M Wilkinson, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Krista M Wilkinson, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Janice Catherine Light, Committee Member, Carol Anne Miller, Committee Member, Rick Owen Gilmore, Outside Member.

Subjects/Keywords: In order to ensure long-term adoption and use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technologies; they must be designed to support children to participate within everyday activities and routines that are prioritized by families. Nine parents of children with cerebral palsy who used AAC technologies participated in semi-structured interviews to provide their perspectives of how AAC technologies were integrated into the functional contexts of everyday life. Five major themes emerged from the discussions: (a) integrating AAC into life; (b) AAC technologies; (c) child needs and skills; (d) parent responsibilities and priorities; and (e) AAC process and decision-making. Children were able to use AAC technologies within a variety of everyday contexts with various partners; however; challenges included access to AAC within physical and outdoor activities and partners who lacked knowledge regarding operational competencies and effective interaction strategies. In order to integrate AAC technologies into life; parents prioritized technology features including ease of programming; improved physical design (e.g.; lighter; wearable; easy to mount; durable); features to enhance efficiency and ease of access (e.g.; brain-computer interface; sentence prediction); and availably of multiple functions and features (e.g.; facial recognition software; augmented reality; projection capabilities; capability to control wheelchair). AAC manufacturers and mainstream technology developers should work to ensure that technologies are responsive to the supports; limitations; and ideal features identified by parents. Future research should seek input from a larger group of stakeholders and use longitudinal methods to examine perceptions of AAC technologies over time. Keywords: technology design; augmentative and alternative communication; parents; cerebral palsy; service delivery; technology design; family

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

O'Neill, T. A. (2018). Perspectives of Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy on the Supports, Challenges, and Realities of Integrating AAC into Everyday Life. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/15513tao5012

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

O'Neill, Tara Anne. “Perspectives of Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy on the Supports, Challenges, and Realities of Integrating AAC into Everyday Life.” 2018. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed January 20, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/15513tao5012.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

O'Neill, Tara Anne. “Perspectives of Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy on the Supports, Challenges, and Realities of Integrating AAC into Everyday Life.” 2018. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

O'Neill TA. Perspectives of Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy on the Supports, Challenges, and Realities of Integrating AAC into Everyday Life. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/15513tao5012.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

O'Neill TA. Perspectives of Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy on the Supports, Challenges, and Realities of Integrating AAC into Everyday Life. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2018. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/15513tao5012

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

3. Johnson, Rupert. Listener Gaze and Pupil Reactions Toward a PWS in Real Time Conversation.

Degree: 2020, Penn State University

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use wearable eye tracking technology to examine the implicit physiological and behavioral reactions toward PWS by examining the ocular behavioral patterns of people who are unfamiliar to stuttering when encountering a person who stutters (PWS) for the first time. Method: Eleven participants who self-reported as being unfamiliar with and unknowledgeable about stuttering wore wearable eye tracking technology while interacting with a PWS and a typically fluent speaker in passive and active social conditions. Results: There were significant differences in pupil size between passive and active social conditions and type of conversation partner. Participants had a higher pupil dilation in the active condition than the passive, and also when interacting with the PWS than the typically fluent speaker. Conclusions: These results indicate that PWS may experience some psychological and emotional arousal and/or increased cognitive load when participating in an active social condition than a passive condition, which may lend support to the “reel vs real” effect in social interaction research. Similarly, participants may experience some psychological and emotional arousal and/or increased cognitive load when socially engaged with or attending to a PWS. This may be a function of effortful listening, unfamiliarity, and/or a implicit, emotional reaction towards stuttered speech. Advisors/Committee Members: Krista M Wilkinson, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Krista M Wilkinson, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Carol Anne Miller, Committee Member, Nicole Michele Etter, Committee Member, Lisa M Conyers, Outside Member, Diane L Williams, Program Head/Chair.

Subjects/Keywords: Listener perceptions; listener reactions; stuttering; Eye-tracking; pupillometry; physiological measures

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, R. (2020). Listener Gaze and Pupil Reactions Toward a PWS in Real Time Conversation. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17732rej5059

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Rupert. “Listener Gaze and Pupil Reactions Toward a PWS in Real Time Conversation.” 2020. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed January 20, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17732rej5059.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Rupert. “Listener Gaze and Pupil Reactions Toward a PWS in Real Time Conversation.” 2020. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Johnson R. Listener Gaze and Pupil Reactions Toward a PWS in Real Time Conversation. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17732rej5059.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson R. Listener Gaze and Pupil Reactions Toward a PWS in Real Time Conversation. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2020. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17732rej5059

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.