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You searched for +publisher:"Penn State University" +contributor:("John Michael Cimbala, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Penn State University

1. Erdman, Matthew D. Modifications to the Runner Blade to Improve Off-design Efficiencies of Hydraulic Turbines.

Degree: 2016, Penn State University

Hydroturbines are known to have very high efficiency at their best efficiency point (BEP). However, it has become increasing beneficial to run some hydroturbines at conditions that are significantly different than BEP. This is a direct result of volatile price fluctuations on the electric market, limited storage capabilities, and environmental rules and regulations. Running the hydroturbine at off-design conditions can result in a significant amount of residual swirl in the draft tube. The presence of this residual swirl is particularly detrimental to the performance of Francis hydroturbines since they rely on a pressure head to generate power. Previous research at The Pennsylvania State University numerically discovered that injecting water through the trailing edge of the wicket gates could change the bulk flow direction upstream of the runner blades. In this manner, the flow rate and swirl angle entering the runner blade could be altered to limit residual swirl in the draft tube. The research determined that properly tuned jets could result in a significant improvement in turbine efficiency when the hydroturbine was operating at low flow. However, this required pumping water through channels into a region of relatively high pressure. This pump requirement lessened the effectiveness of the wicket gate trailing edge injection. The concept of water jet injection was further explored in the present work. However, instead of injecting water into a region of relatively high pressure, water jets were placed at the trailing edge of the runner blades where there is a region of relatively low pressure. It was determined that, although this water jet injection improved the off-design efficiency at 77% of the BEP flow rate by 0.8%, the hydroturbine now required a 9.3% larger head in order to maintain the flow rate. Thus, this technique would be useful only in unique cases. For example, decreased swirl in the draft tube can potentially decrease vibration and losses associated with a spiraling vortex rope. (Note that the simulations here were steady state and did not account for such unsteadiness.) The present work found no increase in efficiency for the high flow case (115% of the BEP flow rate) with the added water jet injection technique. Advisors/Committee Members: John Michael Cimbala, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: Hydropower; Draft tube; Water jet

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Erdman, M. D. (2016). Modifications to the Runner Blade to Improve Off-design Efficiencies of Hydraulic Turbines. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28772

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Erdman, Matthew D. “Modifications to the Runner Blade to Improve Off-design Efficiencies of Hydraulic Turbines.” 2016. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28772.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Erdman, Matthew D. “Modifications to the Runner Blade to Improve Off-design Efficiencies of Hydraulic Turbines.” 2016. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Erdman MD. Modifications to the Runner Blade to Improve Off-design Efficiencies of Hydraulic Turbines. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28772.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Erdman MD. Modifications to the Runner Blade to Improve Off-design Efficiencies of Hydraulic Turbines. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2016. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28772

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. Nelson, Cameron Stuart. A Higher-Order Numerical Method for Solid Conductive Heat Transfer.

Degree: 2016, Penn State University

This thesis details the development of a higher-order numerical finite volume method for solid conductive heat transfer. Important thermodynamic and mathematical principles applied are conservation of energy, the heat diffusion equation, Fourier’s Law, the thermal contact resistance concept, Taylor series expansion, and the first-order backward Euler time-differencing method. The higher-order method turns out to be second-order accurate in space and third-order accurate in time with respect to temperature. Advisors/Committee Members: John Michael Cimbala, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, Daniel Connell Haworth, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: higher-order; finite volume; numerical; conduction; heat transfer

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nelson, C. S. (2016). A Higher-Order Numerical Method for Solid Conductive Heat Transfer. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28757

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nelson, Cameron Stuart. “A Higher-Order Numerical Method for Solid Conductive Heat Transfer.” 2016. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28757.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nelson, Cameron Stuart. “A Higher-Order Numerical Method for Solid Conductive Heat Transfer.” 2016. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Nelson CS. A Higher-Order Numerical Method for Solid Conductive Heat Transfer. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28757.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nelson CS. A Higher-Order Numerical Method for Solid Conductive Heat Transfer. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2016. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28757

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

3. Kern, Ludwig August. FLUENT CFD MODELING IN DESIGN OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DRY STORAGE CASK.

Degree: 2009, Penn State University

A FLUENT Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of a spent nuclear fuel dry storage cask was created to predict several critical design temperatures in order to aid in the design of a dry storage cask. Thermal tests were conducted to determine the ability of the FLUENT CFD code to accurately predict solid structure and fluid temperatures in simple and complex flow geometries. The thermal tests included natural convective flow in a single heated annular tube and realistic heating of a full-scale prototype dry storage cask using heating configurations which bounded the heat source distributions of all possible fuel loading patterns. The FLUENT CFD model of the prototype dry storage cask was successful in demonstrating reasonable accuracy (20% agreement) in predicting the majority of temperatures measured during the thermal tests. The model showed even better accuracy in predicting the hottest rod temperature, the hottest temperature within the cask, which is a critical design temperature, and conservatively bounded all rod temperatures if allowance is given for the measurement uncertainties in the experimental data. However, there was no validation during this set of thermal experiments of the FLUENT CFD model’s ability to accurately model heat transfer between adjacent rods in individual fuel assemblies, which will be necessary before the model is ready for use as part of the thermal design basis for spent nuclear fuel dry storage cask design. A general discussion of computational methods, modeling methodology, FLUENT and other CFD codes, spent nuclear fuel storage, the design of nuclear fuel dry storage casks, and the heat transfer mechanisms modeled for the dry storage cask is also included in addition to the information specific to the dry storage cask FLUENT CFD model and the model validation experiments conducted with the full-scale prototype cask. Advisors/Committee Members: Fan Bill B Cheung, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, Fan Bill B Cheung, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, John Michael Cimbala, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: Fluent; fluent modeling; cfd; cfd modeling; fluent model; cfd model; computational fluid dynamics; nuclear; nuclear engineering; dry storage; dry storage cask; spent fuel; spent nuclear fuel; nuclear fuel; rbmk; chernobyl; holtec; thermal; heat transfer; natural convection; convection; natural convective flow; annular; prototype; full-scale; validation; cfd code; navier-stokes; navier-stokes equation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kern, L. A. (2009). FLUENT CFD MODELING IN DESIGN OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DRY STORAGE CASK. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/9685

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kern, Ludwig August. “FLUENT CFD MODELING IN DESIGN OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DRY STORAGE CASK.” 2009. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/9685.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kern, Ludwig August. “FLUENT CFD MODELING IN DESIGN OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DRY STORAGE CASK.” 2009. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kern LA. FLUENT CFD MODELING IN DESIGN OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DRY STORAGE CASK. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2009. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/9685.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kern LA. FLUENT CFD MODELING IN DESIGN OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DRY STORAGE CASK. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2009. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/9685

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.