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You searched for +publisher:"Penn State University" +contributor:("George H Perry, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 6 of 6 total matches.

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Penn State University

1. Bedoya Reina, Oscar Camilo. Computational Approaches To Predict Phenotype Differences In Populations From High-throughput Sequencing Data.

Degree: 2014, Penn State University

 High-throughput sequencing technologies are changing the world. They are revolutionizing the life sciences and will be the foundation of a promising century of innovations. In… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Population genomics; bioinformatics; Galaxy tools; conservation genomics; biomedical informatics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bedoya Reina, O. C. (2014). Computational Approaches To Predict Phenotype Differences In Populations From High-throughput Sequencing Data. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/21264

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bedoya Reina, Oscar Camilo. “Computational Approaches To Predict Phenotype Differences In Populations From High-throughput Sequencing Data.” 2014. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/21264.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bedoya Reina, Oscar Camilo. “Computational Approaches To Predict Phenotype Differences In Populations From High-throughput Sequencing Data.” 2014. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Bedoya Reina OC. Computational Approaches To Predict Phenotype Differences In Populations From High-throughput Sequencing Data. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/21264.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bedoya Reina OC. Computational Approaches To Predict Phenotype Differences In Populations From High-throughput Sequencing Data. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2014. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/21264

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. Boulay, Jennifer Nicole. Population connectivity and species diversity of Pacific coral reefs.

Degree: 2014, Penn State University

 Unrecognized genetic and species diversity in biotic interactions involving foundation fauna can impede our understanding of ecological drivers of community structuring. In my thesis, I… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: dispersal; connectivity; niche; Porites; Eastern Tropical Pacific; Guam; Acropora; cryptic species

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boulay, J. N. (2014). Population connectivity and species diversity of Pacific coral reefs. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/23589

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boulay, Jennifer Nicole. “Population connectivity and species diversity of Pacific coral reefs.” 2014. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/23589.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boulay, Jennifer Nicole. “Population connectivity and species diversity of Pacific coral reefs.” 2014. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Boulay JN. Population connectivity and species diversity of Pacific coral reefs. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/23589.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Boulay JN. Population connectivity and species diversity of Pacific coral reefs. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2014. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/23589

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

3. Lohay, George Martin. ELEPHANTS WITHOUT BORDERS: HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY GENETIC CONNECTIVITY IN TANZANIA.

Degree: 2019, Penn State University

 African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana) are ecologically important as ecosystem engineers and socio-politically as revenue earners for national economies and local communities. However, their population… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African Savanna elephants; Population structure; genetic connectivity; corridors; fecal-centric; microsatellite markers; simple sequence repeats (SSRs); mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); habitat loss; habitat fragmentation; wildlife corridors; age and sex structure; Amelogenin gene (AMELX/Y)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lohay, G. M. (2019). ELEPHANTS WITHOUT BORDERS: HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY GENETIC CONNECTIVITY IN TANZANIA. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/16781gml166

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lohay, George Martin. “ELEPHANTS WITHOUT BORDERS: HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY GENETIC CONNECTIVITY IN TANZANIA.” 2019. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/16781gml166.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lohay, George Martin. “ELEPHANTS WITHOUT BORDERS: HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY GENETIC CONNECTIVITY IN TANZANIA.” 2019. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Lohay GM. ELEPHANTS WITHOUT BORDERS: HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY GENETIC CONNECTIVITY IN TANZANIA. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/16781gml166.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lohay GM. ELEPHANTS WITHOUT BORDERS: HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY GENETIC CONNECTIVITY IN TANZANIA. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2019. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/16781gml166

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

4. Hall, Molly Ann. Beyond genome-wide association studies (GWAS): Emerging methods for investigating complex associations for common traits.

Degree: 2015, Penn State University

 Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci associated with human phenotypes. This approach, however, does not consider the richly diverse and complex environment with… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: gene-gene interactions; epistasis; PheWAS; phenome; EWAS; exposome; gene-environment interactions; complex traits

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hall, M. A. (2015). Beyond genome-wide association studies (GWAS): Emerging methods for investigating complex associations for common traits. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26751

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hall, Molly Ann. “Beyond genome-wide association studies (GWAS): Emerging methods for investigating complex associations for common traits.” 2015. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26751.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hall, Molly Ann. “Beyond genome-wide association studies (GWAS): Emerging methods for investigating complex associations for common traits.” 2015. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hall MA. Beyond genome-wide association studies (GWAS): Emerging methods for investigating complex associations for common traits. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26751.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hall MA. Beyond genome-wide association studies (GWAS): Emerging methods for investigating complex associations for common traits. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2015. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26751

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

5. De Almeida Assis, Braulio. Visual signals, sexual dimorphism, and conflict - perspectives from eastern fence lizards.

Degree: 2020, Penn State University

 Communication is integral to the life strategies of all living species on the planet, and among all its modalities, visual signals and cues comprise some… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Sceloporus; visual communication; color; sexually antagonistic selection; intralocus sexual conflict

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

De Almeida Assis, B. (2020). Visual signals, sexual dimorphism, and conflict - perspectives from eastern fence lizards. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17809bmd5458

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

De Almeida Assis, Braulio. “Visual signals, sexual dimorphism, and conflict - perspectives from eastern fence lizards.” 2020. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17809bmd5458.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

De Almeida Assis, Braulio. “Visual signals, sexual dimorphism, and conflict - perspectives from eastern fence lizards.” 2020. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

De Almeida Assis B. Visual signals, sexual dimorphism, and conflict - perspectives from eastern fence lizards. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17809bmd5458.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

De Almeida Assis B. Visual signals, sexual dimorphism, and conflict - perspectives from eastern fence lizards. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2020. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17809bmd5458

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

6. Harris, Alexandre. Improved methods for detecting, quantifying, and classifying genetic diversity in natural populations.

Degree: 2020, Penn State University

 The field of population genetics has made impressive advances over the two decades since the sequencing of the human genome, and specifically in the last… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Unbiased estimator; Haplotype; Multilocus genotype; Selective sweep; Maximum likelihood; Soft sweep

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harris, A. (2020). Improved methods for detecting, quantifying, and classifying genetic diversity in natural populations. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17977amh522

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harris, Alexandre. “Improved methods for detecting, quantifying, and classifying genetic diversity in natural populations.” 2020. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17977amh522.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harris, Alexandre. “Improved methods for detecting, quantifying, and classifying genetic diversity in natural populations.” 2020. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Harris A. Improved methods for detecting, quantifying, and classifying genetic diversity in natural populations. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17977amh522.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harris A. Improved methods for detecting, quantifying, and classifying genetic diversity in natural populations. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2020. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/17977amh522

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.