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You searched for +publisher:"Penn State University" +contributor:("David R Stauffer, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Penn State University

1. Wendoloski, Eric B. A Sub-km-gridlength Ensemble for Representing Mesogamma Hazard-prediction Uncertainty in the Stable Boundary Layer over Complex Terrain.

Degree: 2015, Penn State University

Atmospheric transport and dispersion (AT&D) forecasting in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain is inherently uncertain. An ensemble prediction system with sub-km horizontal grid spacing and high vertical resolution is used with the goal of quantifying this uncertainty. Diversity in initial conditions and/or planetary boundary layer/surface layer physics within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model provides ensembles with up to 12 members. WRF explicit ensemble member data drive trajectory calculations and the Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF) model for hazard prediction. Explicit ensemble outcomes from SCIPUFF are compared against SCIPUFF forecasts driven by single members derived from the WRF ensemble and capable of leveraging ensemble wind-field uncertainty statistics. Ensemble performance is evaluated for both 1.3-km and 0.4-km horizontal-grid-spacing ensemble configurations for three case studies of differing flow regimes with respect to the Nittany Valley in central Pennsylvania. AT&D uncertainty is expected to be dependent on small-scale drainage flows and circulations related to trapped-lee wave activity over the valley. Results demonstrate that a 12-member ensemble provides reasonable spread in AT&D outcomes. Additionally, single-member SCIPUFF forecasts reflect much of the spatial spread and impact probability given by explicit SCIPUFF ensemble forecasts but at a reduced computational cost. When evaluated against meteorological observations from the Rock Springs observation network within the valley, ensemble performance statistics demonstrate that low-level wind and temperature forecasts exhibit a statistically significant improvement in the 0.4-km configuration forecasts over the 1.3-km configuration forecasts. Analysis reveals that sub-km horizontal grid spacing better captures temperature and wind fluctuations related to drainage flows and trapped-lee wave activity that directly impact AT&D, and in general, the sub-km ensemble reliably samples the true state of these low-level variables. The best forecast skill is given by the full 12-member ensemble configuration involving both initial-condition and physics diversity. In the trapped-lee wave cases, the use of localized data assimilation positively impacts overall probabilistic forecast skill while the drainage flow case appears more dependent on model physics than initialization strategy with the available observations. Advisors/Committee Members: David R Stauffer, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: Numerical Weather Prediction; Ensemble Modeling; Stable Boundary Layer; Complex Terrain; Nittany Valley

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wendoloski, E. B. (2015). A Sub-km-gridlength Ensemble for Representing Mesogamma Hazard-prediction Uncertainty in the Stable Boundary Layer over Complex Terrain. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/25606

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wendoloski, Eric B. “A Sub-km-gridlength Ensemble for Representing Mesogamma Hazard-prediction Uncertainty in the Stable Boundary Layer over Complex Terrain.” 2015. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/25606.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wendoloski, Eric B. “A Sub-km-gridlength Ensemble for Representing Mesogamma Hazard-prediction Uncertainty in the Stable Boundary Layer over Complex Terrain.” 2015. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Wendoloski EB. A Sub-km-gridlength Ensemble for Representing Mesogamma Hazard-prediction Uncertainty in the Stable Boundary Layer over Complex Terrain. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2015. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/25606.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wendoloski EB. A Sub-km-gridlength Ensemble for Representing Mesogamma Hazard-prediction Uncertainty in the Stable Boundary Layer over Complex Terrain. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2015. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/25606

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. Suarez Mullins, Astrid. Observations of Wave-turbulence Interactions Impacting the Stable Boundary Layer Over Central Pennsylvania.

Degree: 2013, Penn State University

The impact of wave-turbulence interactions in the stable boundary layer is investigated using observations from a special observing network located at Rock Springs, PA. Internal gravity waves can affect the evolution and destruction of valley cold pools and produce intermittent turbulence through the modification of momentum and thermal fluxes and nonlinear phenomena (such as wave breaking or rotors). Thus, their study is crucial for improving air quality modeling and hazard predictions under stable conditions. Six cases, characterized by nonstationarity and complex, near-surface circulations in the stable boundary layer, are identified during the spring-fall season of 2011. These cases include three synoptic regimes for which gravity waves are hypothesized. The first regime is characterized by westerly or northwesterly flow and trapped gravity waves excited by the Allegheny Mts. The second regime is characterized by a strong southerly wind component and trapped lee waves excited by Tussey Ridge. Finally, the third regime is characterized by southerly flow, weak synoptic forcing and weak near-mountain-top shear. Network measurements for the third regime suggest the presence of downslope windstorm-like motions. Observational evidence for the existence of two types of wave-turbulence interactions, resembling that of Type 1 (associated with trapped waves) and Type 2 (associated with hydraulic-jump type events) rotor circulations, impacting the Rock Springs network are presented. It is also shown that periods of warming are typically associated with downward motion, reduced Richardson number, enhanced turbulence, positive vertical heat flux and large directional shifts (up to 180ยบ). The largest temperature and wind speed fluctuations are associated with cases hypothesized to have the strongest nonlinear behavior. Analysis of 2-m turbulence confirms that the Richardson number is not a good measurement of stability for cases characterized by gravity wave activity. Turbulence and positive vertical heat fluxes are observed during periods when Richardson number is much greater than 1. In this study, observational evidence of the presence of complex wave-turbulence interactions generated by moderately complex topography (<300 m AGL) is presented. This work provides the foundation for the investigation of wave-turbulence interactions in the stable boundary layer using high resolution numerical models for real-data cases. Advisors/Committee Members: David R Stauffer, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: terrain-induced gravity waves; rotors; downslope windstorm; stable boundary layer

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Suarez Mullins, A. (2013). Observations of Wave-turbulence Interactions Impacting the Stable Boundary Layer Over Central Pennsylvania. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/19958

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Suarez Mullins, Astrid. “Observations of Wave-turbulence Interactions Impacting the Stable Boundary Layer Over Central Pennsylvania.” 2013. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/19958.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Suarez Mullins, Astrid. “Observations of Wave-turbulence Interactions Impacting the Stable Boundary Layer Over Central Pennsylvania.” 2013. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Suarez Mullins A. Observations of Wave-turbulence Interactions Impacting the Stable Boundary Layer Over Central Pennsylvania. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2013. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/19958.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Suarez Mullins A. Observations of Wave-turbulence Interactions Impacting the Stable Boundary Layer Over Central Pennsylvania. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2013. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/19958

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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