Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Penn State University" +contributor:("Arunangshu Das, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Penn State University

1. Skibinski, Christine G. preclinical investigations into the role of omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention.

Degree: 2015, Penn State University

As discussed in Chapter 1, Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States, with about 2 million women at high risk for developing the disease. A current strategy, approved by the FDA, for breast cancer prevention is the daily administration of selective estrogen receptor modulators(SERMS), tamoxifen and raloxifene. These SERMS have proven to be effective at reducing breast cancer incidence in women that are at high risk by 50% and 38%, respectively. However, these agents are poorly accepted as oral chemopreventives even by women at high risk for breast cancer because of concerns of side effects which include thromboembolic events and an increase in endometrial cancers. Furthermore, both agents are ineffective against the more aggressive estrogen receptor negative tumors. A series of experiments have been conducted in our laboratories to test the hypothesis that chemoprevention can be improved by combining SERMS with agents with different mechanisms of action. Such an approach can allow the use of low doses of SERMS and thus reduce their side effects. Literature data provide some support of the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids against the development of several cancers, including breast cancer. However, the results remain inconsistent which could be due to confounding variables. These confounding variables which have been reported by our group include omega-3:omega-6(n-3:n-6) ratio and caloric intake. A previous study conducted in our laboratories showed that high ratios of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acids(25:1 n-3:n-6) are required to inhibit mammary carcinogenesis in the rat and such high ratios of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acids potentiated the chemopreventive efficacy of tamoxifen. Studies conducted in Chapter 2 were aimed to test the hypothesis that by using a proteomics approach, novel proteins can be identified that can provide insights into the molecular mechanism by which high ratios of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acids inhibit mammary carcinogenesis. We further hypothesize that proteins identified in a minimally invasive fashion can be used for early detection and to monitor the efficacy of the chemopreventive agents. We used an isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) method to provide insights into the mechanism, at the protein level, responsible for the chemopreventive action of the high omega-3:omega-6 fatty acid ratios in the absence and presence of tamoxifen in the 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea(MNU)-induced mammary tumor model in the rat; selective proteins were further validated by western blotting. Compared to control (n-3:n-6, 1:1) diet, both 10:1 and 25:1 n-3:n-6 diets upregulated plasma vitamin D binding protein, gelsolin, and 14-3-3 sigma, reported to have tumor suppressive effects, whereas alpha-1B-glycoprotein which has been reported to be elevated in the serum of breast cancer patients was decreased. Compared to 25:1 n-3:n-6, the 25:1 n-3:n-6 plus tamoxifen diet downregulated apolipoprotein E, haptoglobin, and… Advisors/Committee Members: Karam E El Bayoumy, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Arunangshu Das, Committee Member, Thomas E Spratt, Committee Member, Andrea Manni, Committee Member, Mark Kester, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Docosahexaenoic Acid; Liposome; Breast Cancer Prevention

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Skibinski, C. G. (2015). preclinical investigations into the role of omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26720

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Skibinski, Christine G. “preclinical investigations into the role of omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention.” 2015. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed February 28, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26720.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Skibinski, Christine G. “preclinical investigations into the role of omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention.” 2015. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Skibinski CG. preclinical investigations into the role of omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2015. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26720.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Skibinski CG. preclinical investigations into the role of omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2015. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26720

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. Bortner Jr, James. Proteins as biomarkers for tobacco-induced lung cancer development and chemoprevention.

Degree: 2011, Penn State University

Background: As discussed in Chapter 1, lung cancer continues to be the most common cancer diagnosed in the world and is the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States. The non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) subtype adenocarcinoma is the leading histological type clinically diagnosed in the United States, accounting for over 30% of all cases. The primary risk factor associated with lung cancer is related to cigarette smoking; approximately 87% of lung cancer deaths in the United States are attributed to cigarette smoking. Existing approaches using conventional treatment strategies, including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, have generated minimally significant results for lung cancer survival; 5-year survival for all stages combined is 16%. Furthermore, the disease is often diagnosed at advanced stages of development, beyond the benefit of current treatment. Therefore, alternative approaches in the management of lung cancer, such as early detection and prevention, are urgently needed. In the present investigation we embark upon two strategies with promising clinical implications: identification of (informative) molecular biomarkers related to the development of tobacco-induced lung cancer and the discovery of novel chemopreventive agents. Hypotheses: Current clinical protein biomarkers for detection of lung cancer lack sensitivity and specificity. The proteomics field can contribute greatly to the understanding of mechanisms in cancer progression and treatment response. Therefore, in Chapter 2 we hypothesized that by using proteomic approaches in a well-defined preclinical mouse lung tumorigenesis model induced using the tobacco carcinogen NNK, protein biomarkers could be obtained to provide an accurate view of molecular alterations during lung cancer development. Such biomarkers can provide utility for early detection, but also in the validation of chemoprevention strategies. Smokers are at risk for a variety of health concerns including lung cancer. Non-invasive biological fluids such as blood plasma contains molecular profiles related to current health status. Therefore, in Chapter 3 taking advantage of proteomic techniques and proteins identified in Chapter 2, we hypothesized that dynamic changes in protein expression profiles in the blood plasma of smokers characterized by a proteomics approach would assist in identifying early molecular changes related to tobacco-induced diseases such as lung cancer. Selenium-containing compounds are promising chemopreventive agents against lung cancer development. Developments of agents that can target molecular pathways that are critical in lung carcinogenesis, such as nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide production, known to be involved in the promotion/progression phases of lung carcinogenesis, are needed and may be beneficial in chemoprevention of lung cancer in both smokers and former smokers. Therefore, in Chapter 4 we hypothesized that substitution of sulfur for selenium in an inducible… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr Karam El Bayoumy, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Karam E El Bayoumy, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Arunangshu Das, Committee Member, Gail Lynn Matters, Committee Member, David Spencer Phelps, Committee Member, John Peter Richie Jr., Committee Member, Cara Lynne Schengrund, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: biomarkers; proteomics; 2D-DIGE; iTRAQ; NNK; mouse model; cigarette smoking; plasma; NSCLC; adenocarcinoma; chemoprevention; selenium

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bortner Jr, J. (2011). Proteins as biomarkers for tobacco-induced lung cancer development and chemoprevention. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/12116

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bortner Jr, James. “Proteins as biomarkers for tobacco-induced lung cancer development and chemoprevention.” 2011. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed February 28, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/12116.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bortner Jr, James. “Proteins as biomarkers for tobacco-induced lung cancer development and chemoprevention.” 2011. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Bortner Jr J. Proteins as biomarkers for tobacco-induced lung cancer development and chemoprevention. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2011. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/12116.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bortner Jr J. Proteins as biomarkers for tobacco-induced lung cancer development and chemoprevention. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2011. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/12116

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.