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You searched for +publisher:"Oregon State University" +contributor:("Vavra, Marty"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Oregon State University

1. Woodside, Gail J. Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) behavior and movement in relation to lunar phases.

Degree: MS, Rangeland Ecology and Management, 2010, Oregon State University

Two small herds of Rocky Mountain (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) cow elk were, collared, observed, and spatially mapped for 10 continuous six day trials, conducted during 2008-2009. Five trials occurred during full moon periods and five trials during new moon periods. The elk were collared with 1 second interval GPS loggers which recorded Latitude, Longitude, Elevation, Velocity, and Fix Quantity. Data were analyzed for daily and hourly distance traveled, and time spent moving and stationary. To avoid accumulating GPS errors, travel distance was calculated by summing distances between GPS locations with a non-zero, Doppler based velocity. Data was then partitioned into day and night intervals defined by civil twilight. We addressed the question of whether elk move more during full moon or new moon phases. All statistical analysis were conducted using SAS Proc GLM with Julian day as a covariate to remove seasonality. Elk mean travel across all trials was 6.75 km per day. Nighttime mean travel was 0.29 km/hr. Elk travel was similar at night and during the day whether there was a full moon or not. Advisors/Committee Members: Johnson, Douglas E. (advisor), Vavra, Marty (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: elk; Rocky Mountain elk  – Behavior  – Oregon  – Starkey Experimental Forest and Range

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Woodside, G. J. (2010). Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) behavior and movement in relation to lunar phases. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/19546

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woodside, Gail J. “Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) behavior and movement in relation to lunar phases.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/19546.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woodside, Gail J. “Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) behavior and movement in relation to lunar phases.” 2010. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Woodside GJ. Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) behavior and movement in relation to lunar phases. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/19546.

Council of Science Editors:

Woodside GJ. Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) behavior and movement in relation to lunar phases. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/19546


Oregon State University

2. Korpela, Edwin J. Modeling riparian zone processes : biomass production and grazing.

Degree: PhD, Rangeland Resources, 1992, Oregon State University

Seasonal trends in forage production and environmental parameters for five plant community types within a northeastern Oregon riparian zone were described and modeled using correlation and path analysis. Wet meadows produced the greatest amount of herbage biomass, followed by moist bluegrass meadows, gravel bars, forests and dry bluegrass meadows. Trends in soil moisture generally increased and then declined from spring to fall. Depth to the water table declined and then increased. Soil temperatures steadily increased. Variables driving seasonal forage production varied by community type. Soil moisture was most important in dry bluegrass meadows and least important in wet meadows. Depth to the water table was most important in wet meadows and least important in dry bluegrass meadows. The amount of herbage production which had already occurred was also an important variable in describing biomass production. Streamflow levels and the amount of production having occurred were driving variables in the gravel bar communities. Preference for grazing different riparian vegetation community types and forage intake by cattle was monitored over a three-week grazing period occuring at the end of summer. Concurrent to preference and intake, vegetative and nutritional characteristics of the forage available for grazing were monitored and relationships between these variables and both community preference and intake described through correlation and path analyses. Grazing cattle initially favored communities with highly digestibile forage, hence communities dominated by Kentucky bluegrass were most preferred. Late in the grazing period community preference was best associated with community abundance, indicating that cattle were grazing communities in proportion to their abundance in the pasture. Intake levels were greater during the first year of the study than the second (2.15 versus 1.81 percent of body weight). Daily grazing time declined as livestock neared the end of the grazing period. Intake was correlated with in vitro dry matter digestibility and the amount of time spent grazing, but poorly related to the amount of forage available. The indirect effect of the amount of forage available on intake was greater than the direct effect and functioned through increases in grazing time as a result of increased availability of highly digestible forage. Advisors/Committee Members: Krueger, William C. (advisor), Vavra, Marty (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Biotic communities  – Oregon  – Mathematical models

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Korpela, E. J. (1992). Modeling riparian zone processes : biomass production and grazing. (Doctoral Dissertation). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/36790

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Korpela, Edwin J. “Modeling riparian zone processes : biomass production and grazing.” 1992. Doctoral Dissertation, Oregon State University. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/36790.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Korpela, Edwin J. “Modeling riparian zone processes : biomass production and grazing.” 1992. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Korpela EJ. Modeling riparian zone processes : biomass production and grazing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Oregon State University; 1992. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/36790.

Council of Science Editors:

Korpela EJ. Modeling riparian zone processes : biomass production and grazing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Oregon State University; 1992. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/36790

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