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You searched for +publisher:"Oregon State University" +contributor:("Tilt, Bryan D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Oregon State University

1. Ingman, Mark Christian. The role of plastic mulch as a water conservation practice for desert oasis communities of Northern China.

Degree: MS, Water Resources Policy and Management, 2012, Oregon State University

China's Minqin Oasis once welcomed traders along the ancient Silk Road with rivers, lakes, and lush forests, yet today the region's farmland and grassland are increasingly being engulfed by the sands of the Gobi Desert. The severity of this incremental catastrophe for a declining population of 300,000 residents has brought forth a host of recent water policies to include agronomic water conservation through plastic mulch use, computerized regulation and pricing of groundwater, and water diversions from the Yellow River. This study uses a multi-disciplinary and mixed methods approach to better understand farmer perspectives on why they implement certain water and land use practices in agriculture. The world's farmers currently use the majority of the world's available freshwater and arable land. Modern agriculture and its continued intensification also lead to increases in petroleum based inputs such as agrochemicals and agricultural plastics (plasticulture). Despite the large of impact of the decisions made by the world's farmers on natural resources, little research to date has sought to better understand farmers' perceptions and decision-making processes. Plastic film mulch is a technology that has existed since the 1940's and it has been used in places such as rural China for over five decades. This technology conserves a considerable amount of irrigation water and it increases harvests, however, use of plastic for mulch causes waste disposal problems and is an expenditure of petroleum through plastic manufacturing. Without a fundamental understanding of why farmers perceive plastic mulch to be valuable to their households and communities, we may not fully grasp why its global application continues to increase year after year. Moreover, a focused study of plastic mulch use at the local level may also allow researchers and entrepreneurs to develop a suitable alternative mulch that does not consume non-renewable resources or result in detrimental plastic waste after its utility has been exhausted. This study uses household level interviews, surveys, and participant observation to better understand why Minqin County farmers in rural China continue to use plastic mulch and how it may influence their standard of living. Advisors/Committee Members: Santelmann, Mary V. (advisor), Tilt, Bryan D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Water resources; Plastics in agriculture  – China  – Decision making

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APA (6th Edition):

Ingman, M. C. (2012). The role of plastic mulch as a water conservation practice for desert oasis communities of Northern China. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/34311

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ingman, Mark Christian. “The role of plastic mulch as a water conservation practice for desert oasis communities of Northern China.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/34311.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ingman, Mark Christian. “The role of plastic mulch as a water conservation practice for desert oasis communities of Northern China.” 2012. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Ingman MC. The role of plastic mulch as a water conservation practice for desert oasis communities of Northern China. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/34311.

Council of Science Editors:

Ingman MC. The role of plastic mulch as a water conservation practice for desert oasis communities of Northern China. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/34311

2. Galipeau, Brendan A. Socio-ecological vulnerability in a Tibetan village on the Lancang River, China.

Degree: MA, Applied Anthropology, 2012, Oregon State University

This ethnographic research examines socioeconomic vulnerabilities to resettlement from a large hydropower dam and agricultural commodification in a Tibetan village in Yunnan Province, Southwest China. After providing an initial background on the dynamics of the research region and hydrodevelopment on its rivers, the research framework of examining vulnerability through a lens of political ecology and local knowledge is outlined. Utilizing this framework, the socioeconomic strategies surrounding agriculture and commodified forest products within the study village are initially outlined through the use of oral histories, previous literature, and quantitative household survey data. After providing a detailed background on these income strategies, vulnerabilities to resettlement are examined through qualitative analysis of individual household interviews. This analysis shows that village households are highly reliant on the village's specific location in order to collect the resources and pursue the agriculture that they do; making them vulnerable to future resettlement. The analysis also shows that in the opinions of villagers, a good standard of living is significantly defined by their ability to pursue specific economic strategies. Next, interview results are analyzed to show how agricultural commodification and a very high reliance on one government sponsored company to purchase crops has also made the village highly vulnerable economically. The thesis concludes with reflections on future hydrodevelopment and resettlement scenarios within the village, and provides recommendations to improve local level resilience and promote better capacity to adapt to change. Advisors/Committee Members: Tilt, Bryan D. (advisor), Wolf, Aaron T. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: vulnerability; Tibetans  – China  – Yunnan Sheng  – Economic conditions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Galipeau, B. A. (2012). Socio-ecological vulnerability in a Tibetan village on the Lancang River, China. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/31328

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Galipeau, Brendan A. “Socio-ecological vulnerability in a Tibetan village on the Lancang River, China.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/31328.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Galipeau, Brendan A. “Socio-ecological vulnerability in a Tibetan village on the Lancang River, China.” 2012. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Galipeau BA. Socio-ecological vulnerability in a Tibetan village on the Lancang River, China. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/31328.

Council of Science Editors:

Galipeau BA. Socio-ecological vulnerability in a Tibetan village on the Lancang River, China. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/31328

3. Schmitt, Edwin Anton. Commodification in an Ersu Tibetan village of Sichuan, China.

Degree: MA, Applied Anthropology, 2011, Oregon State University

This ethnographic research aims to discover the implications of the commodification of production processes amongst the Ersu Tibetans of Sichuan, China. This thesis examines the commodification of Ersu agriculture and ethnic identity in the historical context of both China and the world-system. Ethnohistorical and ethnoecological methodologies are utilized to answer how through history the Ersu arrived at a commodified mode of production, what has been commodified and why, and how are villagers adapting to commodification. After providing a detailed analysis of historical changes in Ersu agroecology and identity, two forms of production that are becoming commodified are closely examined: agriculture and tourism. The socio-economic, socio-cultural and socio-ecological adaptations that take place due to the commodification of agriculture and tourism are then highlighted in the thesis. Finally the commodified forms of Ersu agricultural and tourism production are analyzed from the perspective of local resiliency and the thesis is concluded by cautiously recommending applications for improving the resiliency of local production. Advisors/Committee Members: Tilt, Bryan D. (advisor), Kingston, Deanna (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: China; Economic anthropology  – China  – Sichuan Sheng

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schmitt, E. A. (2011). Commodification in an Ersu Tibetan village of Sichuan, China. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/21802

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schmitt, Edwin Anton. “Commodification in an Ersu Tibetan village of Sichuan, China.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/21802.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schmitt, Edwin Anton. “Commodification in an Ersu Tibetan village of Sichuan, China.” 2011. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Schmitt EA. Commodification in an Ersu Tibetan village of Sichuan, China. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/21802.

Council of Science Editors:

Schmitt EA. Commodification in an Ersu Tibetan village of Sichuan, China. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/21802

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