Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Oregon State University" +contributor:("Thompson, Greg"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Martin, Charles T. (Charles Tyler). Economic feasibility of segregating grain by protein concentration while harvesting.

Degree: M.Ag., Agricultural and Resource Economics, 2012, Oregon State University

Price premiums and discounts are currently paid for various classes of wheat in the US marketplace. These premiums and the known heterogeneity of grain protein across landscapes beg the question of whether grain could be separated on the farm to maximize revenues. Theoretically, the concavity or convexity of a price function defines if an opportunity to segregate grain exists. Although this is true, prices in the market place are paid in stepped increments, which result in unique revenue maximizing solutions. This study was conducted to determine the economic feasibility of segregating wheat by protein content on the combine harvester during harvest. Both web-based and spreadsheet calculators were built to predict the best point in which to segregate a crop at, as well as define the protein level and quantity of each segregated volume of grain. The costs of segregation vary by operation, but fixed, variable, and opportunity costs are estimated to total 0.1739 bu⁻¹ if segregation is used every year. Revenue gains varied with the price schedule, field mean protein value, and the standard deviation of protein. Revenue gains increased in proportion to the size of a price step in a price schedule. Soft white winter wheat showed the greatest potential for segregation; however, on average yearly expected premiums are less than .05 bu⁻¹, well below total variable costs. Price schedules occur which allow for profits of over 1.00 bu⁻¹ from segregation, although these are not the norm. Historically, on-combine grain segregation would not be economically feasible for the average producer. However, under certain supply and demand conditions, premiums occur that would make on-combine grain segregation profitable. Individuals will have to evaluate the feasibility on a case-by-case basis. Advisors/Committee Members: Capalbo, Susan (advisor), Thompson, Greg (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Wheat  – Grading  – Economic aspects

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Martin, C. T. (. T. (2012). Economic feasibility of segregating grain by protein concentration while harvesting. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/30334

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martin, Charles T (Charles Tyler). “Economic feasibility of segregating grain by protein concentration while harvesting.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/30334.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martin, Charles T (Charles Tyler). “Economic feasibility of segregating grain by protein concentration while harvesting.” 2012. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Martin CT(T. Economic feasibility of segregating grain by protein concentration while harvesting. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/30334.

Council of Science Editors:

Martin CT(T. Economic feasibility of segregating grain by protein concentration while harvesting. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/30334

2. McKim, Aaron J. The teacher efficacy of early career agriculture teachers in five western states.

Degree: MS, Agricultural Education, 2013, Oregon State University

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between three teacher development experiences and early career agriculture teachers' efficacy. Additionally this study sought to define the relationship between five teacher efficacy constructs and career commitment among early career agriculture teachers in five western states. A census of all agriculture teachers in their first five years of teaching school-based agriculture in California, Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Washington was attempted. Early career teachers' perceptions of the impact of three teacher development experiences, agriculture teacher preparation, student teaching and professional development experiences, were measured. Five areas of teacher efficacy were measured: classroom management, instructional strategies, leadership of students, ability to teach science and ability to teach math. This study found that math and science teaching efficacy were the lowest efficacy areas for these early career agriculture teachers. The perceptions of the impact of teacher development experiences were significantly related to teacher efficacy in the majority of teacher efficacy areas. Additionally, this study found that the five teacher efficacy areas measured were all significantly correlated with career commitment. These findings led the researcher to conclude that increased efforts need to be made to improve early career agriculture teachers' efficacy in math and science teaching. Additionally, the researcher concludes that agriculture teacher preparation, student teaching and professional development experiences are significant to the development of these early career agriculture teachers' efficacy. Lastly, classroom management efficacy, instructional strategies efficacy, leadership of students efficacy, ability to teach science efficacy and ability to teach math efficacy are all significant components to the retention of these early career agriculture teachers; therefore, future research should investigate specific experiences that related to increased agriculture teacher efficacy in those five areas. Advisors/Committee Members: Velez, Jonathan J. (advisor), Thompson, Greg (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Agriculture; Agriculture teachers  – Training of  – West (U.S.)

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McKim, A. J. (2013). The teacher efficacy of early career agriculture teachers in five western states. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/40054

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McKim, Aaron J. “The teacher efficacy of early career agriculture teachers in five western states.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/40054.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McKim, Aaron J. “The teacher efficacy of early career agriculture teachers in five western states.” 2013. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

McKim AJ. The teacher efficacy of early career agriculture teachers in five western states. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/40054.

Council of Science Editors:

McKim AJ. The teacher efficacy of early career agriculture teachers in five western states. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/40054

.