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You searched for +publisher:"Oregon State University" +contributor:("Sanders, Raymond S."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Oregon State University

1. Wills, Byron Steiner. The identification of variables discriminating between groups differing in level of self-actualization through the use of multiple discriminant analysis.

Degree: PhD, Education, 1972, Oregon State University

The study was conducted to identify variables, from among the theory related and demographic/biographic variables included in the study, which were able to discriminate between groups of male and groups of female freshmen who differed in their level of self-actualization. Five hundred and forty freshmen (277 males and 263 females) were administered the Personal Orientation Inventory. Six groups (three male and three female) were drawn from the screened pools on the basis of raw scores on the I scale of the POI. The means for these groups fell at approximately the 12th, 50th and 92nd percentiles of the male and female distributions. The selected subjects were then administered the Tennessee Self Concept Scale, the Differential Value Profile, the Mehrabian Achievement Scales for Males/Females, and the Personal Data Questionnaire (constructed by the author). The variables included in the Personal Data Questionnaire had previously been examined in studies related to self-actualization and/or the theory related variables. Fifty subjects were selected from each of the groups (Total N = 300) for the purpose of analysis. Multiple discriminant analysis was used to determine the ability of the variables to discriminate between the groups of males and females. Null Hypothesis I, which stated that the males and females used in the study would not differ on their scores on the I scale of the POI, was rejected (p<.01). Null Hypothesis II stated that the groups of males would not be discriminated by the theory related variables used in the study. Null Hypothesis III predicted the same results for the female groups. Both null Hypotheses were rejected; null Hypothesis II at the .005 level and null Hypothesis III at the .05 level. Null Hypothesis IV stated that the groups of males would not be discriminated by the demographic/biographic variables used in the study. Null Hypothesis V predicted the same results for the female groups. Null Hypothesis IV was accepted (p>.05) while null Hypothesis V was rejected (p<.005). Null Hypothesis VI stated that combined theory related and demographic/biographic variables would not differ in their ability to discriminate between the groups of males. Null Hypothesis VII predicted the same relationship for the females. Both null Hypotheses were rejected (p <.001). The following were among the conclusions made: 1. The male and female freshmen differed significantly in their levels of self-actualization as measured by the I scale of the Personal Orientation Inventory. 2. Groups of male and female freshmen who differed in their level of self-actualization differed in their perceptions of themselves. 3. The male and female freshmen were discriminated by different combinations of theory related variables indicating the existence of a sex difference on the dimensions of personality related to self-actualization. The discriminating variables were: Moral-Ethical Self, Personal Self, Self-criticism and Social Self. These variables were all contained in the… Advisors/Committee Members: Tollefson, Arthur L. (advisor), Sanders, Raymond S. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Self-actualization (Psychology)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wills, B. S. (1972). The identification of variables discriminating between groups differing in level of self-actualization through the use of multiple discriminant analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/38517

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wills, Byron Steiner. “The identification of variables discriminating between groups differing in level of self-actualization through the use of multiple discriminant analysis.” 1972. Doctoral Dissertation, Oregon State University. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/38517.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wills, Byron Steiner. “The identification of variables discriminating between groups differing in level of self-actualization through the use of multiple discriminant analysis.” 1972. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wills BS. The identification of variables discriminating between groups differing in level of self-actualization through the use of multiple discriminant analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Oregon State University; 1972. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/38517.

Council of Science Editors:

Wills BS. The identification of variables discriminating between groups differing in level of self-actualization through the use of multiple discriminant analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Oregon State University; 1972. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/38517


Oregon State University

2. Edelbrock, Gary Ray. Personality characteristics of selected community college dropouts.

Degree: PhD, Education, 1975, Oregon State University

The Purpose of the Study The central purpose of this study was to determine if certain personality characteristics differ between community college persisters and those who drop out of school. The following 12 a priori hypotheses involving six Adjective Check List personality scales were tested: 1. Male persisters would have a significant higher mean average than male non-persisters on the Deference (Def) Scale. 2. Female persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female non-persisters on the Deference (Def) Scale. 3. Male persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male non-persisters on the Succorance (SUC) scale. 4. Female persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female non-persisters on the Succorance (SUC) scale. 5. Male persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male non-persisters on the Order (Ord) Scale. 6. Female persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female non-persisters on the Order (Ord) Scale. 7. Male non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male persisters on the Autonomy (Aut) Scale. 8. Female non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female persisters on the Autonomy (Aut) Scale. 9. Male non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male persisters on the Exhibition (Exb) Scale. 10. Female non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female persisters on the Exhibition (Exb) Scale. 11. Male non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male persisters on the Change (Cha) Scale. 12. Female non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female persisters on the Change (Cha) Scale. Procedures The project was conducted at Mt. Hood Community College, in Gresham, Oregon. One hundred and seventy-three students participated; 49 women persisters and 24 women dropouts, and 63 men persisters and 37 men who dropped out the first four weeks of spring term, 1974. The data were statistically analyzed using the F-test statistic for main effects and a t-value statistic for the subanalysis of data. Selected Findings Each of the 12 a priori hypotheses was rejected as no significant differences occurred between persisters on the following Adjective Check List scales: Order, Exhibition, Autonomy, Change, Succorance, or Deference. However, significant differences did exist on six scales when the enrollment category effect was tested. The male persisters scored significantly higher on the Defensiveness, Personal Adjustment, Intraception, Affiliation, and Number of Favorable Adjectives checked scales. And male and female persisters scored significantly higher than non-persisters on the Total Number of Adjectives Checked scale. Selected Conclusions Although all a priori hypotheses were rejected, there were a number of related findings. For instance, there were more differences between male persisters and non-persisters than female… Advisors/Committee Members: Sanders, Raymond S. (advisor), Carpenter, Charles E. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: College students  – Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Edelbrock, G. R. (1975). Personality characteristics of selected community college dropouts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/38464

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edelbrock, Gary Ray. “Personality characteristics of selected community college dropouts.” 1975. Doctoral Dissertation, Oregon State University. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/38464.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edelbrock, Gary Ray. “Personality characteristics of selected community college dropouts.” 1975. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Edelbrock GR. Personality characteristics of selected community college dropouts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Oregon State University; 1975. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/38464.

Council of Science Editors:

Edelbrock GR. Personality characteristics of selected community college dropouts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Oregon State University; 1975. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/38464

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