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You searched for +publisher:"Oregon State University" +contributor:("Hildebrandt, Emery V."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Oregon State University

1. Hansen, Laura S. Inter-test comparison of three preschool language tests : SICD, PLS, and PPVT-R.

Degree: MA, Interdisciplinary Studies, 1984, Oregon State University

Thirty preschoolers were tested for language skills using the Preschool Language Scale (PLS), Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R) Form L, and Sequenced Inventory of Communication Development (SICD). Each child's age scores on one test were compared to his/her scores on the other two tests. As a group, the children achieved consistently higher age scores on the PLS than on the PPVT-R, and in turn, higher age scores on the PPVT-R than on the SICD. In terms of age scores, the widest intertest difference was between the receptive subtests of the PLS and SICD, with a mean difference score of 13 months. A paired t-test applied to the within-subject difference scores was significant for every inter-test comparison. Correlation coefficients were not high enough to warrant prediction of an individual child's actual scores on one test from his scores on another test. In the author's opinion, the tendency of one test to produce higher scores than another should be kept in mind during test selection and interpretation. Analysis of age scores showed that this group of children achieved slightly better scores on the expressive portion of the SICD than on the receptive portion of the SICD. However, the children achieved slightly better scores on the receptive half of the PLS than on the expressive half of the PLS. Other studies involving inter-test comparisons are cited in the literature review. Many studies report correlation coefficients but do not include measures of central tendency. It is important that both kinds of data be reported in future studies. Advisors/Committee Members: Hildebrandt, Emery V. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Children  – Language

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hansen, L. S. (1984). Inter-test comparison of three preschool language tests : SICD, PLS, and PPVT-R. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/40892

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hansen, Laura S. “Inter-test comparison of three preschool language tests : SICD, PLS, and PPVT-R.” 1984. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/40892.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hansen, Laura S. “Inter-test comparison of three preschool language tests : SICD, PLS, and PPVT-R.” 1984. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Hansen LS. Inter-test comparison of three preschool language tests : SICD, PLS, and PPVT-R. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 1984. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/40892.

Council of Science Editors:

Hansen LS. Inter-test comparison of three preschool language tests : SICD, PLS, and PPVT-R. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 1984. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/40892


Oregon State University

2. Krivak, Brenda M. Effectiveness of computerized communication treatment for neurologically impaired adults.

Degree: MA, 1992, Oregon State University

The single subject alternating treatment design experiment reported here compared the effectiveness of pencil-and-paper versus computerized communication treatment for neurologically impaired adults. Five stroke patients receiving outpatient speech/language treatment (ages 51-72) served as subjects. One subject completed the experiment as designed and clearly supported the hypothesis that a higher number of correct responses would be produced using the computer generated exercises than the pencil-and-paper version. Two subjects were unable to demonstrate improvement using the experimental treatment program and the other two subjects were unable to master keyboarding skills necessary to use the computer effectively. However, four out of five subjects preferred using the computer even though it did not result in improved performance. Details of specific subjects' performance, and benefits and cautions regarding computer use are discussed. Results suggest that adequate receptive language skills favor effective computer use while impulsivity and visual spatial deficits may be expected to interfere. Careful matching of treatment task to the individual is important; if the task is too easy or too difficult potential benefit of computer use may be masked. The study also supports the finding that computer use is a highly motivating treatment technique for some patients and may be of benefit even if improved task performance does not result. Suggestions for further research include comparison of computerized versus non-computerized treatment for a greater variety of tasks, careful task analysis of currently available software, examination of techniques for training the mechanics of computer use, examination of specific subject characteristics which correlate with successful use of the computer, and determination of which aspect of computer use, specific feedback or improved motivation, is responsible for improved performance. Advisors/Committee Members: Hildebrandt, Emery V. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Communicative disorders  – Treatment  – Data processing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Krivak, B. M. (1992). Effectiveness of computerized communication treatment for neurologically impaired adults. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/36583

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Krivak, Brenda M. “Effectiveness of computerized communication treatment for neurologically impaired adults.” 1992. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/36583.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Krivak, Brenda M. “Effectiveness of computerized communication treatment for neurologically impaired adults.” 1992. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Krivak BM. Effectiveness of computerized communication treatment for neurologically impaired adults. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 1992. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/36583.

Council of Science Editors:

Krivak BM. Effectiveness of computerized communication treatment for neurologically impaired adults. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 1992. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/36583

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