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You searched for +publisher:"Oregon State University" +contributor:("Braunmiller, Jochen"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Oregon State University

1. Williams, Mark Charles. Seismicity at the Cascadia plate boundary beneath the Oregon continental shelf.

Degree: MS, Geophysics, 2011, Oregon State University

Since 2003, 39 small earthquakes have been detected offshore central Oregon in the nominally locked part of the Cascadia subduction zone, where very little seis- mic activity has been recorded in spite of a paleo-seismic record of great subduction events. Although the regional earthquake bulletin reports depths of 29 and 28 km for the two largest events (M[subscript w] 4.9 and M[subscript w] 4.7, which occurred in 2004), analysis by Tréhu et al. (2008) indicates that they were low angle thrust events that occurred on the plate boundary at depths of 9-11 and 16 km, respectively. Due to sparse onshore station coverage, most of the smaller events have large location uncertain- ties. Double-difference relative location of 30 of these earthquakes reveals two tight clusters approximately 30 km apart; each cluster is associated with one of the two larger events. Within each cluster, relocation reduces the hypocenter depth spread from > 15 km to < 3 km, with uncertainties on the order of 0.1 km. The relocations, combined with independent absolute hypocenter locations for two 2008 events using a deployment of land and ocean bottom seismometers, suggest that the seismicity occurred at plate boundary depths, possibly on the Cascadia megathrust. This concentrated activity in the seismogenic zone may represent patches on the fault plane with anomalous frictional characteristics, possibly caused by subducted topographic features, which can affect the propagation of a large megathrust rupture. Advisors/Committee Members: Trehu, Anne (advisor), Braunmiller, Jochen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: seismicity; Cascadia Subduction Zone

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APA (6th Edition):

Williams, M. C. (2011). Seismicity at the Cascadia plate boundary beneath the Oregon continental shelf. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/22666

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Mark Charles. “Seismicity at the Cascadia plate boundary beneath the Oregon continental shelf.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed December 07, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/22666.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Mark Charles. “Seismicity at the Cascadia plate boundary beneath the Oregon continental shelf.” 2011. Web. 07 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Williams MC. Seismicity at the Cascadia plate boundary beneath the Oregon continental shelf. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/22666.

Council of Science Editors:

Williams MC. Seismicity at the Cascadia plate boundary beneath the Oregon continental shelf. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/22666


Oregon State University

2. Monigle, Patrick W. Seismic wave attenuation of the crust and upper mantle in the Himalaya and South-Central Tibetan Plateau.

Degree: PhD, Geophysics, 2014, Oregon State University

Recent geophysical and geological investigations of the Tibetan plateau have given rise to conflicting models of plateau growth and deformation, where the presence and extent of partial melt in the crust could be a determining factor. Here we investigate the attenuation structure of the crust and upper mantle, as attenuation is particularly sensitive to temperature and fluids, both aqueous and melts. We present 3D Qp and Qs results of attenuation structure beneath the HiCLIMB array using local earthquakes recorded between 2004 July and 2005 August. Additional synthetic data analysis shows our ability to expand attenuation analysis beyond the traditional use of first-arriving seismic phases to include reflected and refracted arrivals from the Moho and a persistent upper crust velocity interface. Synthetic analysis also reveals a bandwidth-limited window over which source and attenuation can be uniquely determined, improving the precision of attenuation measurements. Results indicate a high Qp,s upper crust, interrupted by moderate to low Qp faulting and evidence for partial fluid saturation to depths of 15 km and full saturation before 30 km depth. Middle and lower crust attenuation is broadly low Qp,s, with evidence for limited partial melt and interrupted by high Qp,s bodies near the termination of the subducting Indian plate and coincident with a sharp decrease in upper mantle Qp. We find little evidence for extensive partial melt in the crust and the sharpness of Q transitions at depth coincident with changes in faulting style in the upper crust suggest strike-slip motion penetrates the crust and upper mantle at the terminus of subduction. Advisors/Committee Members: Nabelek, John (advisor), Braunmiller, Jochen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Seismology  – Himalaya Mountains

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Monigle, P. W. (2014). Seismic wave attenuation of the crust and upper mantle in the Himalaya and South-Central Tibetan Plateau. (Doctoral Dissertation). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/52296

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Monigle, Patrick W. “Seismic wave attenuation of the crust and upper mantle in the Himalaya and South-Central Tibetan Plateau.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Oregon State University. Accessed December 07, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/52296.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Monigle, Patrick W. “Seismic wave attenuation of the crust and upper mantle in the Himalaya and South-Central Tibetan Plateau.” 2014. Web. 07 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Monigle PW. Seismic wave attenuation of the crust and upper mantle in the Himalaya and South-Central Tibetan Plateau. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Oregon State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/52296.

Council of Science Editors:

Monigle PW. Seismic wave attenuation of the crust and upper mantle in the Himalaya and South-Central Tibetan Plateau. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Oregon State University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/52296


Oregon State University

3. Carpenter, N. Seth. South-central Tibetan seismicity recorded by HiCLIMB seismic array.

Degree: MS, Geophysics, 2010, Oregon State University

The Hi-CLIMB seismic experiment (2002-2005) operated 233 sites along an 800-km long north-south array extending from the Himalayan foreland into the Central Tibetan Plateau and a flanking 350x350 km lateral array in southern Tibet and eastern Nepal. Data from the experiment’s second phase (June 2004 to August 2005), when stations operated in Tibet, were used to locate earthquakes in south-central Tibet, a region with no permanent seismic network and where little is known about its seismicity. The Antelope software package (Boulder Real Time Technologies) was used for automatic event detection and event-arrival association. The automated processing and arrival association produced a weekly average of roughly 1,700 declared events from local to teleseismic distances, totaling over 109,000 for the span of the project. The large database size rendered manual inspection unfeasible and automated post-processing modules were developed to weed out spurious detections and erroneous phase and event associations, which stemmed, e.g., from multiple coincident earthquakes within the array or misplaced seismicity from the great 2004 Sumatra earthquake. The resulting database contains more than 22,500 events within the local area, ~8,000 of those were located with 25 or more arrivals. Seismicity in this high-quality subset correlates well with mapped faults and structures observed in satellite imagery. The quality of the locations is confirmed by comparison with manually-located earthquakes, comparison with InSAR data, and by depth-distributions for a very-high subset of events that matches distributions observed by previous studies using manually-picked arrivals. Seismicity in south-central Tibet is intense north of the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture. The majority of seismicity, 78% of events, occurred in the Lhasa Terrane mainly along north-south trending rifts. Seismicity in the Qiangtang Terrane accounts for more than 16% of activity. In the Tethyan Himalaya, south of the Yarlong Tsangpo Suture, just over 5% of events occurred. The majority of seismicity is in the upper crust but some earthquakes occurred at depths near the Moho, particularly in southern Tibet where deep events have previously been observed. Advisors/Committee Members: Nabelek, John L. (advisor), Braunmiller, Jochen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Tibet seismicity; Seismology  – China  – Tibet

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carpenter, N. S. (2010). South-central Tibetan seismicity recorded by HiCLIMB seismic array. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/19014

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carpenter, N Seth. “South-central Tibetan seismicity recorded by HiCLIMB seismic array.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed December 07, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/19014.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carpenter, N Seth. “South-central Tibetan seismicity recorded by HiCLIMB seismic array.” 2010. Web. 07 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Carpenter NS. South-central Tibetan seismicity recorded by HiCLIMB seismic array. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/19014.

Council of Science Editors:

Carpenter NS. South-central Tibetan seismicity recorded by HiCLIMB seismic array. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/19014

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