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You searched for +publisher:"Old Dominion University" +contributor:("Travis Linneman"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Smith, Kyshawn K. Making the Case for Place: An Exploration of Urbanization Measures on a Model of Social Capital and U.K. Crime Rates.

Degree: PhD, Sociology/Criminal Justice, 2016, Old Dominion University

Studies of social capital and crime have become quite popular in recent history, and a plethora of empirical tests have sought to clarify relationships between the two variables. However, most of these studies center on communities in the United States, and often overlook the many differentiating features between urban and rural communities that would affect such models. Reasons offered for such skew in the past and current research on this subject are middling at best, and largely cite either a lack of availability in data for crime and social capital in non-urban communities, or questionable accuracy for what data is accessible. This dissertation sought to address both the lack of research on social capital effects on crime rates in communities outside of the U.S., and the lack of consideration of urbanization level in such research. Hypotheses derived under these general goals were tested using a combination of multivariate regression analyses and structural equation modeling on datasets provided by the Office of National Statistics (U.K.) and the British Social Attitudes Survey. Findings revealed social capital and crime models vary between urban and rural communities. It was also revealed that models of social capital and crime are contingent upon crime type and urbanization level. Conclusions and implications from this research suggested social capital is relevant in social capital-crime discourse in the U.K., but not always in the ways that current literature suggests it would be. Additionally, it was clear that greater specificity in social capital-crime models in the U.K. is warranted as the data revealed such models are only relevant for a limited combination of crime and community types. Future research should expand towards clarifying the relationship between social capital and crime rates in rural U.K. areas, incorporate more definitions of social capital driven by the idiosyncratic features of urban and rural communities, and consider more exploration of these models in countries typically underrepresented in the literature. Advisors/Committee Members: Ruth A. Triplett, Randy R. Gainey, Travis Linneman.

Subjects/Keywords: Crime models; Crime rates; Social capital; United Kingdom; Rural communities; Urban communities; Criminology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, K. K. (2016). Making the Case for Place: An Exploration of Urbanization Measures on a Model of Social Capital and U.K. Crime Rates. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781369175868 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/sociology_criminaljustice_etds/7

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Kyshawn K. “Making the Case for Place: An Exploration of Urbanization Measures on a Model of Social Capital and U.K. Crime Rates.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed October 18, 2019. 9781369175868 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/sociology_criminaljustice_etds/7.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Kyshawn K. “Making the Case for Place: An Exploration of Urbanization Measures on a Model of Social Capital and U.K. Crime Rates.” 2016. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Smith KK. Making the Case for Place: An Exploration of Urbanization Measures on a Model of Social Capital and U.K. Crime Rates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: 9781369175868 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/sociology_criminaljustice_etds/7.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith KK. Making the Case for Place: An Exploration of Urbanization Measures on a Model of Social Capital and U.K. Crime Rates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2016. Available from: 9781369175868 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/sociology_criminaljustice_etds/7

2. Upton, Lindsey L. Care, Control, or Criminalization? Discourses on Homelessness and Social Responses.

Degree: PhD, Sociology/Criminal Justice, 2016, Old Dominion University

There has been a resurgence of political and media interest in homelessness, particularly in major urban areas throughout the United States. This interest is credited to a number of cities that declared a State of Emergency (SOE) due to their homelessness crisis in 2015. The motivation to declare homelessness as an urgent priority of local politics assists cities in temporarily overcoming longstanding budget and bureaucratic barriers. Undoubtedly, the criminal justice system is part of social response following a declared SOE, and homelessness is not an exception. Little attention has explored the historical, social, and political processes of problematizing homelessness from a criminological perspective. Drawing on theoretical insight from David Garland, Jonathan Simon, and Loïc Wacquant, the politics of homelessness and crime found in New York City (NYC) is interrogated through discourses in the New York Times (NYT) from 1970-2012. This research examines how talk about homelessness responses creates, enacts, and enforces technologies of the criminal justice system. This study finds the politicization of homelessness over time produces and legitimates increased controls and management of marginalized groups, where state authorities are experts, and the boundaries of care and criminalization are blurred. This study has implications for the management of homelessness and policies that further socially exclude the homeless from overcoming such conditions. Advisors/Committee Members: Ruth A. Triplett, Randolph R. Myers, Travis Linneman.

Subjects/Keywords: Care; Criminalization; Discourse; Homelessness; Media; Social control; Criminology; Sociology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Upton, L. L. (2016). Care, Control, or Criminalization? Discourses on Homelessness and Social Responses. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781369183641 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/sociology_criminaljustice_etds/9

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Upton, Lindsey L. “Care, Control, or Criminalization? Discourses on Homelessness and Social Responses.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed October 18, 2019. 9781369183641 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/sociology_criminaljustice_etds/9.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Upton, Lindsey L. “Care, Control, or Criminalization? Discourses on Homelessness and Social Responses.” 2016. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Upton LL. Care, Control, or Criminalization? Discourses on Homelessness and Social Responses. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: 9781369183641 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/sociology_criminaljustice_etds/9.

Council of Science Editors:

Upton LL. Care, Control, or Criminalization? Discourses on Homelessness and Social Responses. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2016. Available from: 9781369183641 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/sociology_criminaljustice_etds/9

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