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You searched for +publisher:"Old Dominion University" +contributor:("Ravi Mukkamula"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Alam, Sawood. HTTP Mailbox - Asynchronous Restful Communication.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2013, Old Dominion University

Traditionally, general web services used only the GET and POST methods of HTTP while several other HTTP methods like PUT, PATCH, and DELETE were rarely utilized. Additionally, the Web was mainly navigated by humans using web browsers and clicking on hyperlinks or submitting HTML forms. Clicking on a link is always a GET request while HTML forms only allow GET and POST methods. Recently, several web frameworks/libraries have started supporting RESTful web services through APIs. To support HTTP methods other than GET and POST in browsers, these frameworks have used hidden HTML form fields as a workaround to convey the desired HTTP method to the server application. In such cases, the web server is unaware of the intended HTTP method because it receives the request as POST. Middleware between the web server and the application may override the HTTP method based on special hidden form field values. Unavailability of the servers is another factor that affects the communication. Because of the stateless and synchronous nature of HTTP, a client must wait for the server to be available to perform the task and respond to the request. Browser-based communication also suffers from cross-origin restrictions for security reasons. We describe HTTP Mailbox, a mechanism to enable RESTful HTTP communication in an asynchronous mode with a full range of HTTP methods otherwise unavailable to standard clients and servers. HTTP Mailbox also allows for multicast semantics via HTTP. We evaluate a reference implementation using ApacheBench (a server stress testing tool) demonstrating high throughput (on 1,000 concurrent requests) and a systemic error rate of 0.01%. Finally, we demonstrate our HTTP Mailbox implementation in a human-assisted Web preservation application called “Preserve Me!" and a visualization application called "Preserve Me! Viz". Advisors/Committee Members: Michael L. Nelson, Michele C. Weigle, Ravi Mukkamula.

Subjects/Keywords: Computer network protocol; Communications software; Web preservation; Web services; Computer Sciences; Digital Communications and Networking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alam, S. (2013). HTTP Mailbox - Asynchronous Restful Communication. (Thesis). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/28

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alam, Sawood. “HTTP Mailbox - Asynchronous Restful Communication.” 2013. Thesis, Old Dominion University. Accessed September 24, 2018. https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/28.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alam, Sawood. “HTTP Mailbox - Asynchronous Restful Communication.” 2013. Web. 24 Sep 2018.

Vancouver:

Alam S. HTTP Mailbox - Asynchronous Restful Communication. [Internet] [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2013. [cited 2018 Sep 24]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/28.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Alam S. HTTP Mailbox - Asynchronous Restful Communication. [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2013. Available from: https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/28

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Harrison, Terry L. Opal: In Vivo Based Preservation Framework for Locating Lost Web Pages.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2005, Old Dominion University

We present Opal, a framework for interactively locating missing web pages (http status code 404). Opal is an example of "in vivo" preservation: harnessing the collective behavior of web archives, commercial search engines, and research projects for the purpose of preservation. Opal servers learn from their experiences and are able to share their knowledge with other Opal servers using the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH). Using cached copies that can be found on the web, Opal creates lexical signatures which are then used to search for similar versions of the web page. Using the OAI-PMH to facilitate inter-Opal learning extends the utilization of OAI-PMH in a novel manner. We present the architecture of the Opal framework, discuss a reference implementation of the framework, and present a quantitative analysis of the framework that indicates that Opal could be effectively deployed. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael L. Nelson, Johan Bollen, Ravi Mukkamula.

Subjects/Keywords: Computer network resources; Digital preservation; Opal servers; OAI-PMH; Web archives; Web sites; Computer Sciences; Digital Communications and Networking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harrison, T. L. (2005). Opal: In Vivo Based Preservation Framework for Locating Lost Web Pages. (Thesis). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/23

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harrison, Terry L. “Opal: In Vivo Based Preservation Framework for Locating Lost Web Pages.” 2005. Thesis, Old Dominion University. Accessed September 24, 2018. https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/23.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harrison, Terry L. “Opal: In Vivo Based Preservation Framework for Locating Lost Web Pages.” 2005. Web. 24 Sep 2018.

Vancouver:

Harrison TL. Opal: In Vivo Based Preservation Framework for Locating Lost Web Pages. [Internet] [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2005. [cited 2018 Sep 24]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/23.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harrison TL. Opal: In Vivo Based Preservation Framework for Locating Lost Web Pages. [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2005. Available from: https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/23

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Haq, Rabia. Using Timed-Release Cryptography to Mitigate Preservation Risk of Embargo Periods.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2008, Old Dominion University

This research defines Time-Locked Embargo, a framework designed to mitigate the Preservation Risk Interval: the preservation risk associated with embargoed scholarly material. Due to temporary access restrictions, embargoed data cannot be distributed freely and thus preserved via data refreshing during the embargo time interval. A solution to mitigate the risk of data loss has been developed by suggesting a data dissemination framework that allows data refreshing of encrypted instances of embargoed content in an open, unrestricted scholarly community. This framework has been developed by exploiting implementations of existing technologies to"time-lock" data using Timed-Release Cryptology (TRC) so that it can be deployed s digital resources encoded in the MPEG-21 Digital Item Description Language (DIDL) complex object format to harvesters interested in harvesting a local copy of content by utilizing The Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH), a widely accepted interoperability standard for the exchange of metadata. The framework successfully demonstrates dynamic record identification, time-lock puzzle (TLP) encryption, encapsulation and dissemination as XML documents. This thesis dissertation presents the framework architecture and provides a quantitative analysis of an implementation. The framework demonstrates successful data harvest of time-locked embargoed data with minimum time overhead without compromising data security and integrity. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael L. Nelson, Michele C. Weigle, Ravi Mukkamula.

Subjects/Keywords: Embargo periods; Encryption; OAI-PMH; Repository; Time-release cryptology; Computer Sciences; Digital Communications and Networking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haq, R. (2008). Using Timed-Release Cryptography to Mitigate Preservation Risk of Embargo Periods. (Thesis). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/26

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haq, Rabia. “Using Timed-Release Cryptography to Mitigate Preservation Risk of Embargo Periods.” 2008. Thesis, Old Dominion University. Accessed September 24, 2018. https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/26.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haq, Rabia. “Using Timed-Release Cryptography to Mitigate Preservation Risk of Embargo Periods.” 2008. Web. 24 Sep 2018.

Vancouver:

Haq R. Using Timed-Release Cryptography to Mitigate Preservation Risk of Embargo Periods. [Internet] [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2008. [cited 2018 Sep 24]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/26.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haq R. Using Timed-Release Cryptography to Mitigate Preservation Risk of Embargo Periods. [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2008. Available from: https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/computerscience_etds/26

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.