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You searched for +publisher:"Old Dominion University" +contributor:("Philip Langlais"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Bent, Blake J. The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Old Dominion University

People have a tendency to discount outcomes that are delayed or probabilistic. In other words, people will sacrifice larger benefits for smaller benefits that are immediate or certain. For many environmentally-friendly (“green”) products, the financial benefits are both delayed and probabilistic. The current study examined how delay and probability, as well as frame and magnitude, influenced consumers’ decisions when comparing a conventional and green product. Participants were recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and completed one of two experiments. In each experiment participants chose between a conventional product (low initial cost, high operating cost) and green product (high initial cost, low operating cost). Magnitude was manipulated by randomly assigning participants to a light bulb (low magnitude) or water heater (high magnitude) condition. Within each magnitude condition, promotional messages highlighted the increased operating cost of the conventional product (loss frame) or decreased operating cost of the green product (gain frame). Probability was manipulated in experiment one and inferred by the participant in Experiment 2. Results supported the recent finding that delay and probability interact. When probabilities of savings were high, participants were more likely to select the green product. This finding occurred whether probabilities were manipulated (Experiment 1) or inferred (Experiment 2). Framing and magnitude effects were inconsistent across experiments. Marketers promoting green products should take steps to reduce perceived risk associated with green products. Advisors/Committee Members: Philip Langlais, Bryan Porter, Mahesh Gopinath.

Subjects/Keywords: Consumer; Decision making; Discounting; Framing; Green; Experimental Analysis of Behavior; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bent, B. J. (2017). The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9780355045055 ; http://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/52

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bent, Blake J. “The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed August 18, 2018. 9780355045055 ; http://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/52.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bent, Blake J. “The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism.” 2017. Web. 18 Aug 2018.

Vancouver:

Bent BJ. The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2017. [cited 2018 Aug 18]. Available from: 9780355045055 ; http://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/52.

Council of Science Editors:

Bent BJ. The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2017. Available from: 9780355045055 ; http://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/52

2. Morley, Christopher. Measuring Team Collaboration and Effects of Target Guidance in a Visual Search Task.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2016, Old Dominion University

Many professional tasks, including military operations and medical operations, involve a team of operators searching for a target on a common visual display. Previous works on collaborative visual search employed analysis of mean response time (RT) and error rates, which may not offer direct measurement of the capacity of a team nor changes in performance across task time. Workload capacity, indexed by the capacity coefficient, C(t), measures performance efficiency for cognitive systems with multiple and concurrent information-processing channels (Townsend & Nozawa, 1995). The current study applied a workload capacity analysis to quantify performance efficiency of pairs of participants in a difficult visual search task. Sixty-eight participants performed a speeded visual search task both solitarily and in pairs with varying levels of target guidance. Each search display contained a target (O) and non-targets (Cs) where the gaps of either 20% (low target guidance) or 80% (high target guidance) of non-targets predicted the location of the target. Results indicate that solitary participants exhibited significantly faster RT in the high guidance condition than the low guidance condition, whereas paired participants demonstrated no difference in RT across target guidance conditions. Additionally, paired participants exhibited limited capacity in both target guidance conditions, indicating that participants slowed response speeds when working collaboratively compared to solitarily, regardless of levels of target guidance. Providing target guidance information may not prevent operators from slowing individual response speeds in collaborative trials. Present findings have implications for the effectiveness of providing target guidance to speed operator responses in contexts such as, search and rescue, surveillance, and reconnaissance. Advisors/Committee Members: Yusuke Yamani (Director), Christopher Brill, Philip Langlais.

Subjects/Keywords: Response time; Team collaboration; Visual search; Workload capacity; Experimental Analysis of Behavior; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Morley, C. (2016). Measuring Team Collaboration and Effects of Target Guidance in a Visual Search Task. (Thesis). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781369170771 ; http://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/32

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Morley, Christopher. “Measuring Team Collaboration and Effects of Target Guidance in a Visual Search Task.” 2016. Thesis, Old Dominion University. Accessed August 18, 2018. 9781369170771 ; http://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/32.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Morley, Christopher. “Measuring Team Collaboration and Effects of Target Guidance in a Visual Search Task.” 2016. Web. 18 Aug 2018.

Vancouver:

Morley C. Measuring Team Collaboration and Effects of Target Guidance in a Visual Search Task. [Internet] [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2016. [cited 2018 Aug 18]. Available from: 9781369170771 ; http://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/32.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Morley C. Measuring Team Collaboration and Effects of Target Guidance in a Visual Search Task. [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2016. Available from: 9781369170771 ; http://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/32

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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