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You searched for +publisher:"Old Dominion University" +contributor:("Melva Grant"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Litchmore, Lucy Nevins. Teachers', Educational Specialists' and School Leaders' Perceptions of the Cumulative Impact of Education Reform Mandates.

Degree: PhD, Educ Foundations & Leadership, 2016, Old Dominion University

Throughout the history of education, there have been changes in funding, organization, governance, and curriculum. As a result of these changes, education reform and mandates have become cyclical in nature. However, with so many structural changes, the purpose of reform mandates often fall short of the intended purpose; closing achievement gaps and allowing equal access for all students. The purpose of this study is to examine the way in which teachers’, educational specialists’, and school leaders perceive the cumulative impact of education reform efforts that will be bounded by subject of mathematics. In a qualitative case study, a combination of 7 teachers, educational specialists, and school leaders were interviewed. An interview protocol was used to gather data regarding participants’ perception of educational reform mandates as it pertains to mathematics. A code book was derived from the findings. Four themes emerged from the study: knowledge building and support, communication and honest conversations, and moral purpose and social justice concerns and reform being seen as a system of improvement or retrenchment. Fundamental for sustainability, all stakeholders were active participants in the reform process. In addition, checks and balances, supports and communication were vital factors that needed to be addressed and revisited along the way to ensure that feedback and improvements to the mandates were implemented with fidelity to ensure sustainability. Advisors/Committee Members: Steve Myran, William Owings, Melva Grant.

Subjects/Keywords: Educational leadership; Equity and social justice; Urban reform; Education; Educational Leadership

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APA (6th Edition):

Litchmore, L. N. (2016). Teachers', Educational Specialists' and School Leaders' Perceptions of the Cumulative Impact of Education Reform Mandates. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781369304909 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/efl_etds/20

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Litchmore, Lucy Nevins. “Teachers', Educational Specialists' and School Leaders' Perceptions of the Cumulative Impact of Education Reform Mandates.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed June 20, 2019. 9781369304909 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/efl_etds/20.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Litchmore, Lucy Nevins. “Teachers', Educational Specialists' and School Leaders' Perceptions of the Cumulative Impact of Education Reform Mandates.” 2016. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Litchmore LN. Teachers', Educational Specialists' and School Leaders' Perceptions of the Cumulative Impact of Education Reform Mandates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: 9781369304909 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/efl_etds/20.

Council of Science Editors:

Litchmore LN. Teachers', Educational Specialists' and School Leaders' Perceptions of the Cumulative Impact of Education Reform Mandates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2016. Available from: 9781369304909 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/efl_etds/20

2. Ray, Tiffany Monique. A Preliminary Study Investigating the Factors Influencing STEM Major Selection by African American Females.

Degree: PhD, Educ Foundations & Leadership, 2016, Old Dominion University

The purpose of this study was to investigate the significant factors influencing STEM major selection by African American females. A quantitative research design with a qualitative component was employed. Ex post facto survey research was conducted utilizing an online questionnaire to collect data from participants. African American undergraduate females that had declared a major in STEM comprised the target population for the study. As a basis for comparison, a second data collection ensued. All non-African American undergraduate females majoring in STEM also received the survey instrument to determine if there was a significant difference between factors that influence STEM major selection between the two groups. The Social Cognitive Career Choice Model comprised the conceptual framework for this study. Frequencies and percentages illustrated the demographic characteristics of the sample, as well as the average influence levels of each of the items without regard for level of significance. The researcher conducted an independent samples t-test to compare the mean scores for undergraduate African American females majoring in STEM and non-African American females majoring in STEM on each influential factor on the survey instrument. The researcher coded responses to open-ended questions to generate themes and descriptions. The data showed that African American female respondents were very influenced by the following items: specific interest in the subject, type of work, availability of career opportunities after graduation, parent/guardian, precollege coursework in science, and introductory college courses. In addition, the majority of respondents were very influenced by each of the confidence factors. African American females were overwhelmingly not influenced by aptitude tests. African American females were more influenced than their non-African American female counterparts for the following factors: reputation of the university, college or department, high level of compensation in fields, religious leaders, precollege coursework in mathematics, confidence in mathematics ability, confidence in ability to be successful in mathematics in college, confidence in science ability, and confidence in ability to be successful in science in college. Non-African American females were more influenced than African American females by the precollege coursework in technology and the precollege STEM experience factors. Four themes emerged regarding the items that most influenced success in STEM for African American females: high level of compensation in the field, parents/legal guardians and family members, specific interest in the subject, and confidence in science and math ability. One theme emerged regarding the items that least influenced success in STEM majors for African American females: personal interactions with individuals excluding family members. Advisors/Committee Members: Dana Burnett, Melva Grant, Ellen Neufeldt.

Subjects/Keywords: Academic major; African American; Career choice; Female; Influence; STEM; African American Studies; Higher Education; Science and Mathematics Education; Women's Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ray, T. M. (2016). A Preliminary Study Investigating the Factors Influencing STEM Major Selection by African American Females. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781369522730 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/efl_etds/24

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ray, Tiffany Monique. “A Preliminary Study Investigating the Factors Influencing STEM Major Selection by African American Females.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed June 20, 2019. 9781369522730 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/efl_etds/24.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ray, Tiffany Monique. “A Preliminary Study Investigating the Factors Influencing STEM Major Selection by African American Females.” 2016. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Ray TM. A Preliminary Study Investigating the Factors Influencing STEM Major Selection by African American Females. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: 9781369522730 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/efl_etds/24.

Council of Science Editors:

Ray TM. A Preliminary Study Investigating the Factors Influencing STEM Major Selection by African American Females. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2016. Available from: 9781369522730 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/efl_etds/24

3. Ford, Deana J. The Effects of Metacognitive Training on Algebra Students’ Calibration Accuracy, Achievement, and Mathematical Literacy.

Degree: PhD, Teaching and Learning, 2018, Old Dominion University

This dissertation describes an empirical study that investigated how metacognitive training influenced lower achieving Algebra students’ calibration accuracy, achievement, and development of mathematics literacy. Multiple methods were used to collect and analyze the data. Close analysis of students’ work and classroom observations revealed that students that were exposed to the metacognitive training had significantly higher prediction accuracy and made gains in their understanding of the mathematics word problems than did students who did not receive the metacognitive training. Overall, however, both the intervention and comparison groups improved in their academic performance and became more mathematically literate and accurate in their metacognitive judgments. These findings suggested that explicit instruction of self-regulation strategies was beneficial for improving metacognitive judgments among lower achieving Algebra students in this study. Results further suggest that the problem-solving strategy enhanced mathematics learning for both groups. Further research is warranted to better understand students’ metacognitions as they engage in the problem-solving process. Advisors/Committee Members: Linda Bol, Melva Grant, Jamie Colwell.

Subjects/Keywords: Achievement; Calibration accuracy; Mathematics literacy; Metacognition; Problem-solving; Self-regulation; Curriculum and Instruction; Mathematics; Science and Mathematics Education; Secondary Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ford, D. J. (2018). The Effects of Metacognitive Training on Algebra Students’ Calibration Accuracy, Achievement, and Mathematical Literacy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9780438991651 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/teachinglearning_etds/14

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ford, Deana J. “The Effects of Metacognitive Training on Algebra Students’ Calibration Accuracy, Achievement, and Mathematical Literacy.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed June 20, 2019. 9780438991651 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/teachinglearning_etds/14.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ford, Deana J. “The Effects of Metacognitive Training on Algebra Students’ Calibration Accuracy, Achievement, and Mathematical Literacy.” 2018. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Ford DJ. The Effects of Metacognitive Training on Algebra Students’ Calibration Accuracy, Achievement, and Mathematical Literacy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2018. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: 9780438991651 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/teachinglearning_etds/14.

Council of Science Editors:

Ford DJ. The Effects of Metacognitive Training on Algebra Students’ Calibration Accuracy, Achievement, and Mathematical Literacy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2018. Available from: 9780438991651 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/teachinglearning_etds/14

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