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You searched for +publisher:"Old Dominion University" +contributor:("Lawrence Hatab"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Cutshaw, Daniel Verlo. Sifting the Commonplace: Topoi and the Grounds for Argument in Classical and Modern Rhetoric.

Degree: PhD, English, 2012, Old Dominion University

This dissertation is a reminder that how we consider reasoning to work and its end is very much bound up with how we think about people, what they are, what they can be, and how they do and should live together. Part of the end of the human being is to understand, to understand the Good or God and thus understand herself and her relation to others and her obligation to others; this is something we see in Aristotle's somewhat-spiritual understanding of Ethics and the Human Being. Focusing on reasoning (and its connection to being) in general, instead of accenting the limitations and conditionings of the human capacity to know, is part of the means of securing the road for this end, which is especially important, as understanding, which is of and by being, is bound up with morality and moral development. Also, bound up with understanding and how human beings should convey it and build it up are rhetoric and dialectic, which are meant to get to the same end, Good or God, together. It is a fundamental contention of this project that rhetoric and dialectic cannot or should not be separated, nor these separated from substance, for rhetoric and dialectic easily become instruments of abuse in isolation, as in, for example, a rigid formalism of the self or a rigid formalism of philosophy. I will focus on dialectical aspects of reasoning and understanding here. Situating Aristotle's discussion of how reasoning operates in a discussion prompted by Toulmin's Uses of Argument, this dissertation shows how Aristotle attempts to avoid the lure of formalism by grounding reasoning and its evaluation in the real (which he understands as the connection among mind, world, and language). Advisors/Committee Members: David D. Metzger, Lawrence Hatab, Timothy Bostic.

Subjects/Keywords: Argument; Aristotle; Dialectic; Topoi; Reasoning; Logic; Philosophy; Rhetoric

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cutshaw, D. V. (2012). Sifting the Commonplace: Topoi and the Grounds for Argument in Classical and Modern Rhetoric. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781267324993 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/english_etds/53

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cutshaw, Daniel Verlo. “Sifting the Commonplace: Topoi and the Grounds for Argument in Classical and Modern Rhetoric.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed June 17, 2019. 9781267324993 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/english_etds/53.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cutshaw, Daniel Verlo. “Sifting the Commonplace: Topoi and the Grounds for Argument in Classical and Modern Rhetoric.” 2012. Web. 17 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Cutshaw DV. Sifting the Commonplace: Topoi and the Grounds for Argument in Classical and Modern Rhetoric. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 17]. Available from: 9781267324993 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/english_etds/53.

Council of Science Editors:

Cutshaw DV. Sifting the Commonplace: Topoi and the Grounds for Argument in Classical and Modern Rhetoric. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2012. Available from: 9781267324993 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/english_etds/53

2. Montoya, Matthew Joseph. Digital Identity Formation: How Social Networking Sites Affect Real World Authenticity.

Degree: MA, Humanities, 2014, Old Dominion University

The purpose of this paper is to explore the application of Heidegger's authenticity to online identity formation. This paper will attempt to determine if there is any way in which an authentic identity can be created, either online or offline, by using social networking sites. It will examine the positive and negative consequences of social networking sites to determine if these sites can help to contribute to our overall being, or determine if these sites serve only as a dangerous distraction to an authentic personal identity. To do this, this paper will analyze Heidegger's philosophy to see if it is possible for his philosophy, which was written pre-SNS, to be applicable to identity formation online. If so, then we shall explore how we form our identities both online and offline. By looking at selected philosophical and sociological works, we will determine what it means to form a personal identity in the offline world. We will look at the effects of public and private sphere convergence, over sharing online, online data commodification, and normative online culture to determine how the self is created and formed online. We will then determine if this online self has the ability to share any personal growth acquired through online interactions to the offline self and thereby allowing for a way to form an authentic self offline using online social networking. Advisors/Committee Members: Dylan Wittkower, Lawrence Hatab, David Roh.

Subjects/Keywords: Martin Heidegger; Identity; Online identity; Digital media; Authenticity; Online social networks; Communication Technology and New Media; Philosophy; Social Media

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Montoya, M. J. (2014). Digital Identity Formation: How Social Networking Sites Affect Real World Authenticity. (Thesis). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781303996986 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/humanities_etds/14

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Montoya, Matthew Joseph. “Digital Identity Formation: How Social Networking Sites Affect Real World Authenticity.” 2014. Thesis, Old Dominion University. Accessed June 17, 2019. 9781303996986 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/humanities_etds/14.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Montoya, Matthew Joseph. “Digital Identity Formation: How Social Networking Sites Affect Real World Authenticity.” 2014. Web. 17 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Montoya MJ. Digital Identity Formation: How Social Networking Sites Affect Real World Authenticity. [Internet] [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 17]. Available from: 9781303996986 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/humanities_etds/14.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Montoya MJ. Digital Identity Formation: How Social Networking Sites Affect Real World Authenticity. [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2014. Available from: 9781303996986 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/humanities_etds/14

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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