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You searched for +publisher:"Old Dominion University" +contributor:("Gary D. Hodgen"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Burleigh, David Williams. Differential Endometrial Responses of Primates vs Rodents: Screening for Antiproliferative Effects of Antiprogestins.

Degree: PhD, 1997, Old Dominion University

The antiprogestin, mifepristone, has previously been shown to noncompetitively inhibit estrogen-induced endometrial proliferation in nonhuman primates (van Uem et al., 1989; Wolf et al., 1989b; Neulen et al., 1990; Neulen et al., 1996). For both economical and ethical reasons, we are encouraged to identify comparative laboratory rodent models which can substitute the need to use primate models. In the following study, we compared capabilities of the rat uterine weight bioassay versus a primate uterine bioassay, to identify the noncompetitive antiestrogenic/antiproliferative effects of mifepristone. Long-term ovariectomized monkeys were exposed to exogenous 17β-estradiol (E2) and mifepristone in doses and regimes already demonstrated to curtail endometrial growth (Wolf et al., 1989b). Results show that mifepristone decreased endometrial proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and this decrease occurred in the presence of physiologic serum E2 levels. In the rat model, ovariectomized immature (day 20) and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with E2 for 3 days, followed by E2 plus mifepristone (various doses) for 3 additional days. E2 replacement was either given as 0.5 μg/100 g body weight (in oil, sc) or as a 0.5 mg sc pellet. Mifepristone did not induce a decrease in uterine wet or blotted weights in immature or adult rats receiving E2 replacement as 0.5 μg/100 g body weight (P>0.05). This lack of effect was not due to insufficient E2 stimulation as histological evaluation of the endometrium showed increased numbers of mitotic figures in all treatment groups and serum E2 levels were in the diestrous-proestrous range. In contrast, mifepristone did inhibit an increase in uterine wet weight of adult rats (P800 pg/ml), illustrating a relationship between E2 levels and capability of mifepristone to affect rat uterine weight. Based on the results summarized here, we do not recommend using the rat uterine weight bioassay as a substitute model for screening antiprogestins for noncompetitive antiestrogenic/antiproliferative effects on primate uterine endometrium. Advisors/Committee Members: Gary D. Hodgen, Robert F. Williams, Keith Gordon, Ke-wen Dong, R. James Swanson.

Subjects/Keywords: RU486; Mifepristone; Animal Structures; Obstetrics and Gynecology; Physiology

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APA (6th Edition):

Burleigh, D. W. (1997). Differential Endometrial Responses of Primates vs Rodents: Screening for Antiproliferative Effects of Antiprogestins. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9780591603767 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/13

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burleigh, David Williams. “Differential Endometrial Responses of Primates vs Rodents: Screening for Antiproliferative Effects of Antiprogestins.” 1997. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed December 15, 2019. 9780591603767 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/13.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burleigh, David Williams. “Differential Endometrial Responses of Primates vs Rodents: Screening for Antiproliferative Effects of Antiprogestins.” 1997. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Burleigh DW. Differential Endometrial Responses of Primates vs Rodents: Screening for Antiproliferative Effects of Antiprogestins. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 1997. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: 9780591603767 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/13.

Council of Science Editors:

Burleigh DW. Differential Endometrial Responses of Primates vs Rodents: Screening for Antiproliferative Effects of Antiprogestins. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 1997. Available from: 9780591603767 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/13

2. Van Dyk, Qinuo Fan. Sex Chromosome Ratios and Aneuploidy Rates in the Zona Pellucida Selected Spermatozoa From Normal and Subfertile Men.

Degree: PhD, 1997, Old Dominion University

The human hemizona has been demonstrated to select spermatozoa with good motility, normal morphology, and the capacity to undergo the zona-induced acrosomal reaction. The studies conducted here are directed at using the human hemizona to investigate two key questions: (1) whether human X-chromosome bearing spermatozoa (X-sperm) and Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa (Y-sperm) differ in their functional survival time (assessed by their capacity to bind to the human zona pellucida) after prolonged in vitro incubation, and (2) whether hemizona-bound spermatozoa have a reduced aneuploidy rate compared to unbound (and therefore, unselected) spermatozoa? In the functional survival study, donor spermatozoa were held in vitro for up to 72 hours using two systems: at 4°C refrigeration and at 37° incubation. At each 24 hour storage interval, spermatozoa were coincubated with human hemizona, and the total numbers of zona-bound X-sperm and Y-sperm were determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The analysis revealed that although equal proportions of X-sperm and Y-sperm survived functionally throughout the 72 hours at 4°C refrigeration, the proportions differed after 48 hours incubation when the storage took place at 37°C, with significantly more Y-sperm surviving functionally than X-sperm. Spermatozoa from subfertile patients were used in the aneuploidy study. This study demonstrated that zona-bound spermatozoa had a significantly lower chromosomal aneuploidy rate compared to unbound spermatozoa. This indicates that hemizona has the potential to be used clinically to improve the genetic quality of zygotes fertilized using intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Advisors/Committee Members: Gary D. Hodgen, Susan Lanzendorf, Mary C. Mahony, R. James Swanson, James P. Toner.

Subjects/Keywords: Sex chromosome ratios; Aneuploidy rates; Zona pellucida; Spermatozoa; Genetics; Molecular Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Van Dyk, Q. F. (1997). Sex Chromosome Ratios and Aneuploidy Rates in the Zona Pellucida Selected Spermatozoa From Normal and Subfertile Men. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9780591631845 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/86

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Dyk, Qinuo Fan. “Sex Chromosome Ratios and Aneuploidy Rates in the Zona Pellucida Selected Spermatozoa From Normal and Subfertile Men.” 1997. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed December 15, 2019. 9780591631845 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/86.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Dyk, Qinuo Fan. “Sex Chromosome Ratios and Aneuploidy Rates in the Zona Pellucida Selected Spermatozoa From Normal and Subfertile Men.” 1997. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Van Dyk QF. Sex Chromosome Ratios and Aneuploidy Rates in the Zona Pellucida Selected Spermatozoa From Normal and Subfertile Men. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 1997. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: 9780591631845 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/86.

Council of Science Editors:

Van Dyk QF. Sex Chromosome Ratios and Aneuploidy Rates in the Zona Pellucida Selected Spermatozoa From Normal and Subfertile Men. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 1997. Available from: 9780591631845 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/86

3. Lanzendorf, Susan E. Microsurgical Fertilization of Mammalian Eggs: An Assessment of Clinical Utilization.

Degree: PhD, Biological Sciences, 1987, Old Dominion University

Microsurgical fertilization is the technique in which a spermatozoon or sperm nucleus is injected into the cytoplasm of an egg. To establish a foundation for the use of microsurgical fertilization as a means of treating infertility, this study evaluated the procedure in hamster and human eggs. Hamster sperm nuclei were microinjected into hamster eggs to determine the rate of abnormal fertilization and to ultrastructurally assess cellular damage by transmission electron microscopy. Hamster eggs were also injected with human spermatozoa obtained from fertile and infertile men to evaluate the fertilizing potential of the sperm cells. In addition, human eggs donated by patients undergoing in vitro fertilization were injected with human spermatozoa to perform a preliminary evaluation of the human egg's ability to survive the sperm microinjection procedure and participate in the early events of fertilization. This study found no evidence of ultrastructural damage to either hamster or human eggs surviving the microinjection procedure although abnormal fertilization events were found to occur in surgically fertilized hamster eggs at an incidence of six percent. In the study of human spermatozoa, no significant difference was found in the rate of pronuclear formation following microinjection between spermatozoa differing in motility and maturational status. Spermatozoa found incapable of penetrating an egg by normal fertilization were shown to be capable of sperm decondensation and pronuclear formation following their direct injection into the cytoplasm of an egg. In addition, human eggs were found to be capable of surviving the mechanical insertion of a spermatozoon directly into the ooplasm with subsequent development to the pronuclear stage of fertilization. Advisors/Committee Members: Gary D. Hodgen, Keith Carson, Joseph C. Daniel, Lloyd Wolfinbarger, Jr..

Subjects/Keywords: Microsurgical fertilization; Mammalian eggs; Hamsters; Biology; Developmental Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lanzendorf, S. E. (1987). Microsurgical Fertilization of Mammalian Eggs: An Assessment of Clinical Utilization. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/111

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lanzendorf, Susan E. “Microsurgical Fertilization of Mammalian Eggs: An Assessment of Clinical Utilization.” 1987. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed December 15, 2019. https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/111.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lanzendorf, Susan E. “Microsurgical Fertilization of Mammalian Eggs: An Assessment of Clinical Utilization.” 1987. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Lanzendorf SE. Microsurgical Fertilization of Mammalian Eggs: An Assessment of Clinical Utilization. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 1987. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/111.

Council of Science Editors:

Lanzendorf SE. Microsurgical Fertilization of Mammalian Eggs: An Assessment of Clinical Utilization. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 1987. Available from: https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/biomedicalsciences_etds/111

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