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You searched for +publisher:"Old Dominion University" +contributor:("Bryan Porter"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Collmus, Andrew Burnett. Game-Framing Cognitive Assessments to Improve Applicant Perceptions.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2016, Old Dominion University

Research has shown that although cognitive testing is key to quality hiring, applicants often react poorly to cognitive ability tests. Applicant reactions theory indicates that time-length judgments of a selection procedure can affect applicant perceptions. It was thus hypothesized that game-framing, the act of labeling something a game without changing the content, would cause participants to perceive that time was moving faster while completing a battery of cognitive ability tests. Similarly, it was expected that game-framing would increase test motivation and decrease test anxiety. Perceived length was tested as a mediator for the effects of game-framing on test anxiety and on test motivation. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the hypothesized relationships. In the observed dataset, game-framing caused decreases in perceived length, perceived length was positively related to test motivation, and perceived length mediated the relationship between game-framing and test motivation. The results of this study demonstrate that game-framing affects time perceptions. This finding has implications for gamification researchers, namely, that game-framing effects should be measured and accounted for in future studies. Furthermore, applicant reactions theorists have suggested that perceived time length is a key variable in the overall applicant reactions model, and this study is the first to empirically investigate perceived time length of a selection procedure in this context. Results indicate that perceived length may not relate to other applicant reaction variables as predicted by applicant reactions theory. Advisors/Committee Members: Richard N. Landers, Xiaoxiao Hu, Bryan Porter.

Subjects/Keywords: Applican reactions; Cognitive ability; Employment; Framing; Gamification; Selection; Industrial and Organizational Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Collmus, A. B. (2016). Game-Framing Cognitive Assessments to Improve Applicant Perceptions. (Thesis). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781369506075 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/41

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Collmus, Andrew Burnett. “Game-Framing Cognitive Assessments to Improve Applicant Perceptions.” 2016. Thesis, Old Dominion University. Accessed October 20, 2018. 9781369506075 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/41.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Collmus, Andrew Burnett. “Game-Framing Cognitive Assessments to Improve Applicant Perceptions.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2018.

Vancouver:

Collmus AB. Game-Framing Cognitive Assessments to Improve Applicant Perceptions. [Internet] [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2016. [cited 2018 Oct 20]. Available from: 9781369506075 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/41.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Collmus AB. Game-Framing Cognitive Assessments to Improve Applicant Perceptions. [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2016. Available from: 9781369506075 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/41

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Bent, Blake J. The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Old Dominion University

People have a tendency to discount outcomes that are delayed or probabilistic. In other words, people will sacrifice larger benefits for smaller benefits that are immediate or certain. For many environmentally-friendly (“green”) products, the financial benefits are both delayed and probabilistic. The current study examined how delay and probability, as well as frame and magnitude, influenced consumers’ decisions when comparing a conventional and green product. Participants were recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and completed one of two experiments. In each experiment participants chose between a conventional product (low initial cost, high operating cost) and green product (high initial cost, low operating cost). Magnitude was manipulated by randomly assigning participants to a light bulb (low magnitude) or water heater (high magnitude) condition. Within each magnitude condition, promotional messages highlighted the increased operating cost of the conventional product (loss frame) or decreased operating cost of the green product (gain frame). Probability was manipulated in experiment one and inferred by the participant in Experiment 2. Results supported the recent finding that delay and probability interact. When probabilities of savings were high, participants were more likely to select the green product. This finding occurred whether probabilities were manipulated (Experiment 1) or inferred (Experiment 2). Framing and magnitude effects were inconsistent across experiments. Marketers promoting green products should take steps to reduce perceived risk associated with green products. Advisors/Committee Members: Philip Langlais, Bryan Porter, Mahesh Gopinath.

Subjects/Keywords: Consumer; Decision making; Discounting; Framing; Green; Experimental Analysis of Behavior; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bent, B. J. (2017). The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism. (Doctoral Dissertation). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9780355045055 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/52

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bent, Blake J. “The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Old Dominion University. Accessed October 20, 2018. 9780355045055 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/52.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bent, Blake J. “The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism.” 2017. Web. 20 Oct 2018.

Vancouver:

Bent BJ. The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2017. [cited 2018 Oct 20]. Available from: 9780355045055 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/52.

Council of Science Editors:

Bent BJ. The Effects of Delay and Probabilistic Discounting on Green Consumerism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Old Dominion University; 2017. Available from: 9780355045055 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/52

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