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You searched for +publisher:"Oklahoma State University" +contributor:("Towner, Mary"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Oklahoma State University

1. Van Ert, Elizabeth A. How Female Diet Impacts Life History Traits in the Triangulate Cobweb Spider: Effects of Nutrition on Females and Their Offspring.

Degree: Zoology, 2016, Oklahoma State University

In spiders, nutrients in a mother's diet are provided to her offspring through the eggs she produces, and consequently food quality may impact offspring life history traits. In this study, I tested the effect of maternal diet quality on egg sac production and offspring survival in Steatoda triangulosa, the triangulate cobweb spider. The nutritional quality of a female's diet was experimentally manipulated by feeding her fruit flies with a gradient of lipid and protein. I measured several life history traits both for the female and her offspring, including female body size at maturation, number of egg sacs produced, whether or not those egg sacs were viable, and offspring quality. I evaluated two main predictions. First, that females fed the high protein diet would produce more egg sacs than females fed the low protein (high lipid) diet. Second, that offspring whose mothers were reared on the high protein diet would have higher survival rates and would develop faster than those offspring whose mothers were reared on the low protein diet treatment. Results showed that the female spider�s diet had a large impact on her reproductive success. Of the 94 females in the study, 22 produced egg sacs, with 11 of these producing multiple egg sacs. Females in the protein treatments were more likely to produce an egg sac (viable or not) and a higher average number of egg sacs per female, than in other treatments. Only females fed a protein-enriched diet made viable egg sacs that ultimately produced surviving spiderlings. The high protein mother�s spiderlings had a higher survival rate through the first and final molt and also developed at a faster pace than the intermediate protein mother�s spiderlings. Advisors/Committee Members: Towner, Mary (advisor), Wilder, Shawn (committee member), Fox, Stanley (committee member).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van Ert, E. A. (2016). How Female Diet Impacts Life History Traits in the Triangulate Cobweb Spider: Effects of Nutrition on Females and Their Offspring. (Thesis). Oklahoma State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/54624

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Ert, Elizabeth A. “How Female Diet Impacts Life History Traits in the Triangulate Cobweb Spider: Effects of Nutrition on Females and Their Offspring.” 2016. Thesis, Oklahoma State University. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/54624.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Ert, Elizabeth A. “How Female Diet Impacts Life History Traits in the Triangulate Cobweb Spider: Effects of Nutrition on Females and Their Offspring.” 2016. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Van Ert EA. How Female Diet Impacts Life History Traits in the Triangulate Cobweb Spider: Effects of Nutrition on Females and Their Offspring. [Internet] [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/54624.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Van Ert EA. How Female Diet Impacts Life History Traits in the Triangulate Cobweb Spider: Effects of Nutrition on Females and Their Offspring. [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/54624

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Oklahoma State University

2. Wells, Allison. Reproductive life history decisions and success of freshwater pond snails (Physa acuta) during chronic zinc exposure.

Degree: Integrative Biology, 2019, Oklahoma State University

Life history theory examines how individuals should make trade-offs between current reproductive effort and survival to achieve future reproductive gains. A prediction is that as future life expectancy decreases, individuals should invest more in current reproduction at the cost of lower survival and future reproduction. Although P. acuta have been shown to display a relatively high tolerance to anthropogenic contaminants and pollutants, research regarding sub-lethal chronic exposure to contaminants and reproductive effort is limited. However, it has been shown that higher zinc concentrations lower P. acuta survival rates. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine if chronic sub-lethal exposure to zinc has the potential to alter an individual's reproductive life history decisions, and if the magnitudes of these decisions are dependent upon a site's historic zinc exposure. Snails were collected from 3 sites within the Grand Lake watershed that have different zinc concentrations. Their offspring were then exposed to one of 5 zinc concentrations over the course of ~18 weeks. Individuals from these sites showed differences in response to zinc treatments. Individuals from historically moderate zinc concentrations followed life history predictions most closely, as an increase in zinc treatment resulted in earlier timing of reproductive events and growth. However, individuals from historically low zinc exposure showed delayed growth and reproduction as zinc concentration increased. Individuals from high historic zinc exposure in general displayed few negative effects from the zinc treatments, likely due to a high zinc tolerance among these individuals. Overall, results showed evidence of a gradient of local adaptation and tolerance of zinc. Tolerance seemed to be a key factor in whether individuals make life history changes in response to metal contamination. Advisors/Committee Members: Luttbeg, Barney (advisor), Towner, Mary (committee member), Belden, Jason (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: life history; physa; reproduction; tolerance; zinc

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wells, A. (2019). Reproductive life history decisions and success of freshwater pond snails (Physa acuta) during chronic zinc exposure. (Thesis). Oklahoma State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324920

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wells, Allison. “Reproductive life history decisions and success of freshwater pond snails (Physa acuta) during chronic zinc exposure.” 2019. Thesis, Oklahoma State University. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324920.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wells, Allison. “Reproductive life history decisions and success of freshwater pond snails (Physa acuta) during chronic zinc exposure.” 2019. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Wells A. Reproductive life history decisions and success of freshwater pond snails (Physa acuta) during chronic zinc exposure. [Internet] [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324920.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wells A. Reproductive life history decisions and success of freshwater pond snails (Physa acuta) during chronic zinc exposure. [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324920

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Oklahoma State University

3. Clauss, Nikki Jo. Impact of a Western-pattern diet on the interaction of prenatal stress, maternal behavior and offspring phenotype.

Degree: Psychology, 2019, Oklahoma State University

Maternal prenatal stress is a significant source of developmental stress that can leave an epigenetic signature on offspring, leading to stress-related and anxious behavior. A limited amount of work has been accomplished demonstrating that a Western-pattern diet (WPD) during lactation leads to anxiety reduction in juvenile rodents. However, the impact of early developmental experience on the potential neurobiological pathways that contribute to the association between diet and behavior have not yet been elucidated. It is also unclear whether the apparent diet-induced reduction in anxiety-like behavior extends into adulthood, whether it requires a consistent highly palatable diet, or if there are sex differences. To address this gap in the literature, the focus of the current study was to determine whether the impact of prenatal stress could be mitigated by a diet that stimulates the same neuroendocrine systems influenced by early stress. I hypothesized that the lasting developmental effects of stress on anxious behavior would be mitigated by a highly palatable WPD through the upregulation of Dopamine D1 (Drd1) and D2 (Drd2) receptor genes in mesolimbic pathways that have downstream effects on the expression of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor genes (Gr). Through the use of behavioral and genetic approaches, three aims were addressed: Aim 1 assessed whether offspring lactation diet and prenatal stress interact with the expression of Drd1, Drd2, and Gr to predict offspring anxious-like behavior. Aim 2 determined whether this behavioral phenotype persisted into adulthood and whether it required an ongoing WPD. Aim 3 assessed whether there were sex differences in the models tested. Results demonstrated that offspring lactation diet and prenatal stress (measured via maternal condition) interacted with the expression of Drd1, Drd2, and Gr to predict juvenile anxious-like behavior. As expected, the chow-fed offspring of stressed dams displayed significantly more anxious-like behavior in the open field test than WPD-fed offspring of stressed dams and their non-stressed counterparts. Indeed, the WPD-fed offspring of prenatally stressed dams exhibited a gene expression and behavioral pattern more similar to the control group than to the chow-fed stressed group, and this effect was driven largely by female offspring. For female offspring, this behavior pattern continued into adulthood if there was no change to their post-weaning diet. However, those offspring whose diet was switched at weaning displayed increased anxious-like behavior, whether their mothers experienced prenatal stress or not. Post-weaning diet did not have a significant impact on male offspring behavior. Ultimately, the results of this research help to elucidate the relationship between social environment, underlying genetics of behavior, and shifts in behavior that lead to long term health effects. Advisors/Committee Members: Byrd-Craven, Jennifer (advisor), Grant, DeMond (committee member), Hawkins, Misty (committee member), Towner, Mary (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: development; diet; epigenetics; sex differences; stress

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clauss, N. J. (2019). Impact of a Western-pattern diet on the interaction of prenatal stress, maternal behavior and offspring phenotype. (Thesis). Oklahoma State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/325457

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clauss, Nikki Jo. “Impact of a Western-pattern diet on the interaction of prenatal stress, maternal behavior and offspring phenotype.” 2019. Thesis, Oklahoma State University. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/325457.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clauss, Nikki Jo. “Impact of a Western-pattern diet on the interaction of prenatal stress, maternal behavior and offspring phenotype.” 2019. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Clauss NJ. Impact of a Western-pattern diet on the interaction of prenatal stress, maternal behavior and offspring phenotype. [Internet] [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/325457.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Clauss NJ. Impact of a Western-pattern diet on the interaction of prenatal stress, maternal behavior and offspring phenotype. [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/325457

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.