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You searched for +publisher:"Oklahoma State University" +contributor:("Richardson, Shawna"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Oklahoma State University

1. Casey, Brent. Oklahoma Career Tech Superintendents' perceptions of educational leadership preparation experiences.

Degree: Educational Leadership Studies, 2020, Oklahoma State University

Research has shown that effective educational leadership preparation is a key component in the success of school administrators (Johnson & Uline, 2005; McCarthy, 2015). Effective preparation of educational leaders is an important issue facing education, because it not only affects student achievement and teacher quality, but also is a vital component in maintaining the quality and culture within our schools. However, a discrepancy still seems to exist as it relates to a "one size fits all" approach to developing and preparing school leaders. While the majority of the knowledge, skills, and competencies apply to all school leaders, differences appear to exist as it relates to the type of educational institution the school administrator aspires to lead. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the perceptions, through the lens of the Three-Skills Approach to leadership development (Katz, 1955), of CTE Superintendents related to how their educational leadership preparation program prepared them for leadership in Career and Technology Education. This case study involved in-depth interviews with eight Oklahoma Career Tech Superintendents along with the collection of documents and artifacts for triangulation purposes to add validity and credibility to the data. Through the data analysis, three themes emerged including: (a) there was a lack of applicable content in educational leadership programs for CTE leadership positions, (b) the knowledge and skills in the educational leadership programs were focused on K12 school leadership which is different than needed in CTE leadership, and (c) specific knowledge as well as technical, human, and conceptual skills are needed in the role as a CTE Superintendent. This study suggests and identified specific technical, human, and conceptual skills that are needed by individuals aspiring to become an administrator or a Superintendent in a Career Tech center. These findings will assist the required educational leadership preparation programs ensure future administrators are adequately prepared for their role of leadership in the CTE setting. Advisors/Committee Members: Curry, Katherine (advisor), Harris, Ed (committee member), Self, Mary Jo (committee member), Richardson, Shawna (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: career tech; leadership; preparation; superintendent

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Casey, B. (2020). Oklahoma Career Tech Superintendents' perceptions of educational leadership preparation experiences. (Thesis). Oklahoma State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/325494

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Casey, Brent. “Oklahoma Career Tech Superintendents' perceptions of educational leadership preparation experiences.” 2020. Thesis, Oklahoma State University. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/325494.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Casey, Brent. “Oklahoma Career Tech Superintendents' perceptions of educational leadership preparation experiences.” 2020. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Casey B. Oklahoma Career Tech Superintendents' perceptions of educational leadership preparation experiences. [Internet] [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/325494.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Casey B. Oklahoma Career Tech Superintendents' perceptions of educational leadership preparation experiences. [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/325494

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Oklahoma State University

2. Coates, Margaret Coates. Integrating Factors of Grit in School Culture: Case Studies of Two Freshman Academies.

Degree: Education Leadership & Policy Studies (PhD), 2017, Oklahoma State University

The purpose of this qualitative case study is to explore the cultural manifestation of grit in two freshman academy environments and describe factors of grit that support student success. This study used purposeful sampling to select sites and participants. Data were collected through: administration of Douglas� (1982) grid and group 24-question survey to determine cultural typology of each school; the administration of Duckworth�s (2007) 8 item, Grit-S scale to determine the �grittiness� of each faculty; structured interviews with four teachers and one assistant principal from each site; observations, documents, photographs, electronic communication, flyers, demographic reports, and school websites. Douglas� (1982) grid and group matrix was used as the theoretical framework to explore the cultures of each school and to understand how Duckworth and Quinn�s �two-factor� construct of grit, which is consistency of interest and perseverance of effort, is culturally manifested in each school. This study provides analysis of these cases with regard to the four psychological assets of grit, as it relates to the organizational environment of each school: interest (teacher/student school passion); practice (routine school activities); purpose (school vision, mission, and goals); and hope (optimism, opportunities) (Duckworth, 2016). Findings revealed that by examining grid dimensions of each school, the similarities and differences of grit were manifested with regard to teacher and administrator roles, organization and structure of the school, and school programs could be explained. Additionally, by examining group dimensions of each school, similarities and differences of how grit was manifested in teacher goals, stakeholder expectations, collaboration, and stakeholder relationships could be explained. Programs that contributed to the development of grit were those that allowed opportunities for students to engage with technology, their peers, and their teachers, as well as programs that provided time for academic supports. Findings confirmed grit development is possible within a freshman transition program and is manifested in programs and supports for teachers and students in a culture of high expectations, collaboration, supports for students and teachers, and an environment of relationship building. Implications for practice include, the promotion of grit in learning environments, teacher education programs, and improved four-year cohort graduation rates. Advisors/Committee Members: Harris, Edward (advisor), Curry, Katherine (committee member), Richardson, Shawna (committee member), Romans, John S. C. (committee member).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coates, M. C. (2017). Integrating Factors of Grit in School Culture: Case Studies of Two Freshman Academies. (Thesis). Oklahoma State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/54507

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coates, Margaret Coates. “Integrating Factors of Grit in School Culture: Case Studies of Two Freshman Academies.” 2017. Thesis, Oklahoma State University. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/54507.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coates, Margaret Coates. “Integrating Factors of Grit in School Culture: Case Studies of Two Freshman Academies.” 2017. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Coates MC. Integrating Factors of Grit in School Culture: Case Studies of Two Freshman Academies. [Internet] [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/54507.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Coates MC. Integrating Factors of Grit in School Culture: Case Studies of Two Freshman Academies. [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/54507

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Oklahoma State University

3. Knowles, Kathryn D. BRAIN Program and Promotion of Self-Regulation for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Case Study.

Degree: School Administration, 2019, Oklahoma State University

The purpose of this qualitative case study is to explore, through the lens of self-regulated learning theory, the interrelationship of the BRAIN program and the development of positive classroom behaviors for students with emotional and behavioral disorders in a selected Midwestern school district. This study used purposeful sampling to select five school sites implementing the BRAIN program. The study participants were principals and BRAIN teachers at the five school sites. Data were collected through interviews of four principals, five BRAIN teachers, observations, and documents. Identification of self-regulated learning theory espoused by Zimmerman and Campillo (2003), Zimmerman (2000), and Pintrich and Zusho (2002) occurred prior to conducting the study, providing a lens through which to present and analyze the implementation of the BRAIN program at the five school sites. Findings indicated the BRAIN program is a district-led program implemented with consistency at five school sites for grade levels K-8. The BRAIN team at each site has autonomy in flexing the program to meet the needs of students with support from the district BRAIN team. Self-regulated learning theory helps to explain the interrelationship of the BRAIN program and the facilitation of the development of positive classroom behaviors. Through the cycle of forethought, performance or practice, and self-reflection, students learn to self-regulate behaviors and gain control in the general education classrooms. As this cycle continues, students become more confident in their abilities and are intrinsically motivated toward greater autonomy in controlling the behaviors. Additional research could focus on BRAIN students as they progress and exit the program to better understand their perceptions on their ability to self-regulate behaviors. Advisors/Committee Members: Harris, Ed (advisor), Mania Singer, Jackie (committee member), Richardson, Shawna (committee member), Hammer, Tonya R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: self-regulated learning theory; self-regulation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Knowles, K. D. (2019). BRAIN Program and Promotion of Self-Regulation for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Case Study. (Thesis). Oklahoma State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/323352

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knowles, Kathryn D. “BRAIN Program and Promotion of Self-Regulation for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Case Study.” 2019. Thesis, Oklahoma State University. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/323352.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knowles, Kathryn D. “BRAIN Program and Promotion of Self-Regulation for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Case Study.” 2019. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Knowles KD. BRAIN Program and Promotion of Self-Regulation for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Case Study. [Internet] [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/323352.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Knowles KD. BRAIN Program and Promotion of Self-Regulation for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Case Study. [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/323352

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.