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You searched for +publisher:"North Carolina State University" +contributor:("Robert L. Mikkelsen, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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North Carolina State University

1. Cobb, Chester Ray. Estimating Nitrogen Efficiency of Swine Lagoon Liquid Applied to Field Crops Using Continuously Variable Irrigation.

Degree: M, Soil Science, 2002, North Carolina State University

Application of anaerobic swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) lagoon liquid onto cropland by irrigation is a common method of waste disposal and treatment. Currently, the application rate of swine lagoon liquid is based on the N concentration of the lagoon liquid and the N required by the receiver crop to obtain a realistic yield. In North Carolina, only 50% of the total N in the swine lagoon liquid applied by irrigation is considered available for plant use during the first year after application. Uncertainty exists as to whether this coefficient accurately predicts the amount of plant-available N. Therefore, research was conducted in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina to determine the efficiency of N uptake by corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max Merrill) receiving swine lagoon liquid through irrigation. The line-source sprinkler irrigation method was used to provide a continuous variable N rate, ranging from 0 to 290 kg N/ha, across the field during 1999 and 2000. Ammonia volatilization losses r anged from 6 to 22% during irrigation. Crop yield and grain N recovered were affected more by the amount of liquid than N applied in 1999. Nitrogen recovered in grain in 1999 was <15% for both corn and soybean at 168 kg N/ha of either swine lagoon liquid or ammonium nitrate. In 2000 at the 168 kg N/ha rate, grain N removal by corn, nonnodulating soybean, and nodulating soybean was 28, 25, and 39% from swine lagoon liquid and 45, 31, and 56% from ammonium nitrate. Based on yields and grain N removed by corn and nonnodulating soybean in 2000, N from applied swine lagoon liquid, accounting for N losses during irrigation, was about 70% as effective as ammonium nitrate. Symbiotic N2 fixation by the soybean was reduced by 60% when applied N reached 175 kg N/ha for both ammonium nitrate and swine lagoon liquid. While nodulating soybean removed more grain N than did either corn or nonnodulating soybean in 2000, soil inorganic N concentrations at the end of the growing season were higher for the nodulating s oybean. Therefore, it is not conclusive if soybean would be a better receiver crop than corn for swine lagoon liquid. Based on the results of this study, using the 50% available N coefficient of the lagoon liquid comes close to predicting plant-availabl e N when N losses during irrigation are around 25%. Nitrogen losses during irrigation can significantly affect plant-available N when applied N is based on the N concentrations of the lagoon liquid. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert L. Mikkelsen, Committee Chair (advisor), Rodney L. Huffman, Committee Member (advisor), Larry D. King, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: corn; soybean; line-source irrigation technique; plant available nitrogen

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cobb, C. R. (2002). Estimating Nitrogen Efficiency of Swine Lagoon Liquid Applied to Field Crops Using Continuously Variable Irrigation. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/709

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cobb, Chester Ray. “Estimating Nitrogen Efficiency of Swine Lagoon Liquid Applied to Field Crops Using Continuously Variable Irrigation.” 2002. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/709.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cobb, Chester Ray. “Estimating Nitrogen Efficiency of Swine Lagoon Liquid Applied to Field Crops Using Continuously Variable Irrigation.” 2002. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Cobb CR. Estimating Nitrogen Efficiency of Swine Lagoon Liquid Applied to Field Crops Using Continuously Variable Irrigation. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2002. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/709.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cobb CR. Estimating Nitrogen Efficiency of Swine Lagoon Liquid Applied to Field Crops Using Continuously Variable Irrigation. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2002. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/709

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North Carolina State University

2. Allen, Mark Benjamin. Managing nitrogen from swine and poultry manure in North Carolina.

Degree: MS, Soil Science, 2004, North Carolina State University

With increasing pressure to regulate land application of animal manure, North Carolina faces a difficult dilemma, given the number of large-scale animal production facilities currently in operation. Poultry and swine industries in the state generate large volumes of animal manure that must be properly managed in order to avoid loss of N to ground water and surface water bodies. Using swine manure as an N source for soybean production is not commonly practiced due to soybean's ability to fix N, but recent research suggests that soybean may be a suitable receiver crop of anaerobic swine lagoon effluent. The objectives of this research were twofold: (1) determine the quantity of swine effluent-derived N taken up by soybean and estimate the degree of inhibition of symbiotic N-fixation and (2) determine how soil pH affects N mineralization, nitrification and immobilization when soil is amended with broiler litter. Swine effluent was spiked with (15NH4)2SO4 in order to attain a mean final 15N enrichment of 5.765 atom % 15N. The enriched effluent was applied 6 times at weekly intervals to nodulating and nonnodulating soybean growing in one-meter deep lysimeters at a rate of 185 kg PAN ha-1. Additional lysimeters with nodulating and nonnodulating soybean received no applications of effluent. Leachate was collected on a weekly basis and analyzed for 15N and total N. Soybean were harvested near maturity and analyzed for 15N and total N. Biological N-fixation in soybean was not completely inhibited when swine effluent was added and accounted for 55% of the total N in the shoot. Nodulated and nonnodulated soybean shoots recovered similar amounts of effluent N (36.6% and 33.4%, respectively). The addition of effluent and nodulation were both important sources of N for soybean growth, although the results suggest that nodulating and nonnodulating soybean behaved differently when they received effluent additions, as indicated by significant interactions. The experimental data showed that less than 1% of the added effluent N was accounted for in the leachate. An N budget of the plant-soil-water system showed that, of the effluent N added to nodulated soybean, 37% remained in the soil after the soybean were harvested, while 33% remained in the effluent-treated nonnodulated soybean. These results suggest that soybean can serve as an N receiver crop when swine effluent is the N source. To determine the effects of soil pH on N transformations in broiler litter amended soils, Wagram loamy sand with a pH of 4.4 was collected from a forested area near Clayton, NC, and sub-samples were limed to pH 4.8, 5.3, 5.8, 6.4, and 7.0. Broiler litter was added at a rate of 155 kg PAN ha-1 to the limed soils and incubated at 25°C and 60% of field capacity for 112 d. Total inorganic N was measured at 0, 7, 14, 28, 56, 77, and 112 d. Cumulative net N mineralized was fitted to a first order model to determine potentially mineralizable N. Although nitrification rates increased as soil pH increased, there were significant inverse… Advisors/Committee Members: Philip W. Westerman, Committee Member (advisor), Michael G. Wagger, Committee Member (advisor), Wei Shi, Committee Member (advisor), Robert L. Mikkelsen, Committee Chair (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: poultry litter; nitrogen mineralization; soil pH; soybean nitrogen use; nitrogen; swine effluent

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Allen, M. B. (2004). Managing nitrogen from swine and poultry manure in North Carolina. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/140

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Allen, Mark Benjamin. “Managing nitrogen from swine and poultry manure in North Carolina.” 2004. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/140.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Allen, Mark Benjamin. “Managing nitrogen from swine and poultry manure in North Carolina.” 2004. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Allen MB. Managing nitrogen from swine and poultry manure in North Carolina. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2004. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/140.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Allen MB. Managing nitrogen from swine and poultry manure in North Carolina. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2004. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/140

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.