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You searched for +publisher:"North Carolina State University" +contributor:("Paul V. Nelson, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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North Carolina State University

1. Williams, Amy Lynn. Foliar symptomology and tissue concentrations of five nutritionally deficient floriculture crops.

Degree: MS, Horticultural Science, 2004, North Carolina State University

Tissue analysis standards and complete visual deficiency symptoms of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, and B are crucial for monitoring plant nutrient status. Foliar analysis standards and visual symptoms of nutritional disorders for calibrachoa, angelonia, bracteantha, brachyscome 'Mini Yellow', and brachyscome 'Jumbo Mauve' have not been published and were the objectives of this study. These plants were grown hydroponically in a glass greenhouse at 35oN latitude. Nutrient treatments were based on the macronutrient composition of Hoagland's all-nitrate nutrient solution with altered micronutrient levels and 11 additional related solutions, each devoid of one essential nutrient. Visual symptoms were chronologically recorded and photographed. Synoptic visual deficiency symptoms were as follows: N — Plants were stunted with smaller leaves. As symptoms progressed the plants developed a light green chlorosis and the lowest leaves developed a yellow chlorosis followed by a brown necrosis. P — Plants were smaller and all the foliage developed a dark green pigmentation, which progressed into a necrosis of the lower mature leaves. K — Plants develop chlorosis of the leaf tips and margins, which quickly progress into necrosis. Ca — Severe stunting and compactness would result, accompanied by chlorosis and necrosis of the shoot tips. Flowering would cease or be incomplete. Mg — Recently mature and mature leaves would develop a uniform or interveinal chlorosis, which would progress from a light green to yellow, and then turn brown. S — Plants would be severely stunted and then develop a uniform lime-green chlorosis. Fe — A light green chlorosis would progress from the shoot tips to the mature leaves, which would progress into a light yellow followed by a white chlorosis and brown necrosis. Mn — A light green chlorosis of the entire plant, which would often be smaller in size. Necrosis would affect the recently mature leaves. Zn — Young leaves would develop a light green chlorosis and be slightly puckered. Cu — Plants were small and developed a blue-green pigmentation. Severe twisting and rolling of the young leaves was observed. B — Extreme rosetting and deformation of the shoot tips and young leaves resulted in short compact plants. Foliage was deep green and glossy with a thick, leathery texture. The rate at which symptoms occurred is an indication of the species sensitivity to a particular nutrient deficiency. The chronological order in which nutrient deficiency symptoms occurred was as follows: that were first to occur by species were as follows: Calibrachoa — Fe, Ca, Mn, N, S, B, K, P, Cu, Zn and Mg. Angelonia — Ca, Fe, K, N, P, S, Cu, Mn, B, Zn and Mg. Bracteantha — Fe, Ca, B, K, N, P, Mg, S, Mn, Zn and Cu. Brachyscome 'Mini Yellow' — Fe, Ca, N, P, B, Mn, S, Mg, Cu, Zn and K. Brachyscome 'Jumbo Mauve' — Fe, N, B, Ca, P, K, S, Mg and Cu. Brachyscome 'Jumbo Mauve' plants were extremely resistant to Mn and Zn, because these… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Paul V. Nelson, Committee Chair (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: foliar symptomology; visual identification; tissue standards;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Williams, A. L. (2004). Foliar symptomology and tissue concentrations of five nutritionally deficient floriculture crops. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1539

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Amy Lynn. “Foliar symptomology and tissue concentrations of five nutritionally deficient floriculture crops.” 2004. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1539.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Amy Lynn. “Foliar symptomology and tissue concentrations of five nutritionally deficient floriculture crops.” 2004. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Williams AL. Foliar symptomology and tissue concentrations of five nutritionally deficient floriculture crops. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2004. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1539.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Williams AL. Foliar symptomology and tissue concentrations of five nutritionally deficient floriculture crops. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2004. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1539

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North Carolina State University

2. Pitchay, Dharmalingam S. Impact of 11 Elemental Nutrient Deficiencies on Shoot and Root Growth, and Foliar Analysis Standards of 13 Ornamental Taxa with Emphasis on Ca and B Control of Root Apical Meristem Development.

Degree: PhD, Horticultural Science, 2003, North Carolina State University

Tissue analysis standards and complete visual deficiency symptoms of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, and B are crucial for monitoring plant nutrient status. Limited information is available on visual disorder symptoms and foliar analysis standards for vinca, celosia, marigold, zinnia, salvia, pansy, impatiens, begonia, petunia, ornamental cabbage, snapdragon and New Guinea impatiens. Synoptic visual deficiency symptoms were as follows: N - Symptoms began on lower leaves as uniform light green chlorosis to yellow and finally necrotic. Development of red to purple pigmentation was observed in marigold, snapdragon, begonia and ornamental cabbage. P - All foliage became deeper green, then lower leaves became purplish/reddish in some species, and finally necrotic. K - In the early stage of deficiency, plants became compact and deeper green. Later, necrosis developed on tips and margins of older leaves. Ca - Necrotic symptoms first developed on roots, then on young leaves and shoot apex. However, the shoot apices of New Guinea impatiens and impatiens did not develop necrosis. Mg - Interveinal chlorosis developed on older leaves followed by necrosis along the margins. S - The entire leaves became uniformly lighter green. Then the margins of all leaves became more chlorotic then the remainder of the leaves. Eventually, the margins developed necrosis. Fe - Young leaves developed interveinal chlorosis, generally from the base. Then the entire lamina turned chlorotic. The chlorosis then gave way to bleached whitish-yellow. Mn - Young and recently matured leaves developed chlorosis, and mature leaves developed stippling of necrosis. Drastic reduction of shoot and root growth was common. Flowering was severely inhibited. Cu - Impaired flower development includes reduced size and premature abscission. Desiccation and sudden death of tissue occurred on recently mature leaves. Chlorosis was generally not a distinguishing feature. Zn - Young and recently matured leaves developed puckering, chlorosis, and necrosis. Some plants developed purple pigmentation. B - Foliage became darker green and glossy. Young and recently matured leaves became thick, leathery and brittle with severe distortions. The roots were short and stubby. The rate at which symptoms occurred is an indication of the species sensitivity to a particular nutrient deficiency. The nutrient deficiency symptoms that were first to occur by species were as follows: begonia - N and Fe, celosia - N and K, impatiens - Ca, marigold - N and Fe, New Guinea impatiens 'Grenada' - Ca, New Guinea impatiens 'Timor' - Fe, ornamental cabbage - Ca and Fe, pansy - Fe, petunia - Fe, salvia - N, snapdragon - Ca, vinca - Fe, and zinnia - Ca. Root and shoot apical meristems are specialized areas where cell proliferation and organogenesis take place. The absence of Ca, B and CaB greatly reduced primary root growth relative to control within 12 hours. The number of abnormal nuclei decreased in the order of Ca > CaB > B deficient treatments. Nuclei in both Ca and CaB deficiency… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Paul V. Nelson, Committee Chair (advisor), Dr. Udo Blum, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. Brian E. Whipker, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. Nancy G. Creamer, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: disorders; Vinca; B; Zn; New Guinea impatiens; Begonia; symptoms; Zinnia; Celosia; deficiency; ornamental; bedding plant; chromatin; Mg; nuclei; mitotic index; nutrient; deprivation; foliar analysis; foliar standards; hydroponic; Marigold; S; Ca; K; Snapdragon; Ornamental cabbage; Petunia; cell analysis; N; P; Cu; Mn; Fe; Pansy; chlorosis; necrosis; Salvia; Impatiens

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pitchay, D. S. (2003). Impact of 11 Elemental Nutrient Deficiencies on Shoot and Root Growth, and Foliar Analysis Standards of 13 Ornamental Taxa with Emphasis on Ca and B Control of Root Apical Meristem Development. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5258

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pitchay, Dharmalingam S. “Impact of 11 Elemental Nutrient Deficiencies on Shoot and Root Growth, and Foliar Analysis Standards of 13 Ornamental Taxa with Emphasis on Ca and B Control of Root Apical Meristem Development.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5258.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pitchay, Dharmalingam S. “Impact of 11 Elemental Nutrient Deficiencies on Shoot and Root Growth, and Foliar Analysis Standards of 13 Ornamental Taxa with Emphasis on Ca and B Control of Root Apical Meristem Development.” 2003. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Pitchay DS. Impact of 11 Elemental Nutrient Deficiencies on Shoot and Root Growth, and Foliar Analysis Standards of 13 Ornamental Taxa with Emphasis on Ca and B Control of Root Apical Meristem Development. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2003. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5258.

Council of Science Editors:

Pitchay DS. Impact of 11 Elemental Nutrient Deficiencies on Shoot and Root Growth, and Foliar Analysis Standards of 13 Ornamental Taxa with Emphasis on Ca and B Control of Root Apical Meristem Development. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2003. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5258


North Carolina State University

3. Rippy, Janet Fairbanks Miles. Factors Affecting pH Establishment and Maintenance in Peat Moss-Based Substrates.

Degree: PhD, Horticultural Science, 2005, North Carolina State University

Problems of inconsistent initial pH in peat moss substrates created using standard formulas for agricultural limestone additions, and substrate pH drift from the initial target may result from variations in the neutralization capacity of limestone and in the neutralization requirement of peat moss. This research was conducted to evaluate physical and chemical properties of limestone that may influence neutralization capacity, and properties of peat moss that may influence neutralization requirement. Limestones from twenty North American quarries were wet-sieved into eight particle diameter fractions (600 to < 38 μm). Specific surface of limestone particles was measured for each fraction. Reaction times were determined on three limestone particle size fractions. Particle size distribution, CaCO₃ and MgCO₃ contents, internal porosity, hardness, soundness, specific gravity, and specific surface were analyzed in multiple regressions with particle size included and also held constant at three size fractions to evaluate effects on limestone neutralization capacity. Peat moss samples were selected from Alberta, Canada bogs to represent the maximum range of species composition and the decomposition range (H1.5 to H4.0) used for commercial horticulture. Peat moss cation exchange capacity, base and iron saturation, inherent pH, buffer capacity and neutralization requirement were measured. These properties were analyzed in a multiple regression along with species composition, degree of decomposition, and detritus to determine effects on peat moss neutralization requirement. Limestones differed significantly in specific surface for each particle diameter fraction and in reaction times. There were significant variations in cation exchange capacity, base saturation, inherent pH, buffer capacity and neutralization requirement of peat mosses. Neutralization requirement was negatively correlated with base saturation, inherent pH, decomposition, [Fe²⁺], and sedge; and was positively correlated with S. angustifolium. Sphagnum species influenced cation exchange capacity, base saturation, and inherent pH. Inherent pH was most influenced by base saturation. Peat moss samples containing large amounts of S. fuscum had high cation exchange capacity and base saturation, and low degrees of decomposition. Adding specific surface measurements to those of particle size distribution and CaCO₃ content will further characterize limestone neutralization capacity; however, the problem of inconsistent initial pH can be better managed by understanding the inherent pH and base saturation of the peat mosses in the substrate. The problem of pH drift from the target can be controlled by ensuring an adequate amount of S. fuscum in the substrate. Advisors/Committee Members: Dean L. Hesterberg, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Theodore E. Bilderback, Committee Member (advisor), Eugene J. Kamprath, Committee Member (advisor), Paul V. Nelson, Committee Chair (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: buffer capacity; inherent pH; base saturation; CEC; Sphagnum species; reactivity; Limestone specific surface

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rippy, J. F. M. (2005). Factors Affecting pH Establishment and Maintenance in Peat Moss-Based Substrates. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5254

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rippy, Janet Fairbanks Miles. “Factors Affecting pH Establishment and Maintenance in Peat Moss-Based Substrates.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5254.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rippy, Janet Fairbanks Miles. “Factors Affecting pH Establishment and Maintenance in Peat Moss-Based Substrates.” 2005. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Rippy JFM. Factors Affecting pH Establishment and Maintenance in Peat Moss-Based Substrates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2005. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5254.

Council of Science Editors:

Rippy JFM. Factors Affecting pH Establishment and Maintenance in Peat Moss-Based Substrates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2005. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5254

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