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You searched for +publisher:"North Carolina State University" +contributor:("Geoff Benson, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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North Carolina State University

1. Drewnoski, Mary Elizabeth. Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle.

Degree: PhD, Nutrition, 2009, North Carolina State University

Supplements are often fed to stocker cattle on forage-based diets to improve animal performance. Delivery costs can make up a substantial portion of the cost of supplementation. Reducing supplementation frequency can reduce labor and equipment costs and therefore has the potential to increase profit. However, less frequent feeding requires feeding larger quantities of supplement at once and can increase the likelihood of negative associative effects of supplementation. Additionally, little is understood about the metabolic response of ruminants to large fluxuation in nutrient intake. A 50:50 blend of soyhulls and corn gluten feed is widely used by producers to supplement growing cattle. This blend is high in energy but low in starch. It also contains a moderate amount of protein, much of which is ruminally degradable. The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of reducing supplementation frequency of a soybean hull and corn gluten feed blend on performance, digestion, and concentrations of metabolites and hormonal growth regulators in blood of steers. In Experiment 1, growing steers consuming medium quality fescue hay were supplemented either daily, 3 times a week, or 2 times a week. Hay intake was decreased by reducing supplementation frequency but gains were not affected. As a result, the feed to gain ratio increased slightly with less frequent supplementation. In Experiment 2, six ruminally cannulated steers consuming medium quality fescue hay were used in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square to determine the effect of supplement frequency (daily at 1% BW or on alternate days at 2% BW) on digestion and ruminal parameters. Reducing supplementation frequency decreased hay intake but did not affect digestibility of the diet. On the day of supplementation molar proportions both of propionate and butyrate in the rumen of steers supplemented on alternate days was increased compared to those supplemented daily. In Experiment 3, growing steers were individually fed medium quality hay and supplemented daily (1% BW) or on alternate days (2% BW). Gains did not differ due to supplementation frequency. However, plasma IGF-1 was greater and insulin tended to be greater in steers supplemented less frequently. Advisors/Committee Members: Gerald Huntington, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Geoff Benson, Committee Member (advisor), Matthew Poore, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Vivek Fellnar, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Supplementation frequency; steers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drewnoski, M. E. (2009). Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5273

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drewnoski, Mary Elizabeth. “Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed February 24, 2021. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5273.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drewnoski, Mary Elizabeth. “Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle.” 2009. Web. 24 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Drewnoski ME. Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 24]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5273.

Council of Science Editors:

Drewnoski ME. Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2009. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5273


North Carolina State University

2. Liu, Jiajun. Domain Enhanced Analysis of Microarray Data Using GO Annotations.

Degree: PhD, Statistics, 2008, North Carolina State University

New biological systems technologies give scientists the ability to measure thousands of bio-molecules including genes, proteins, lipids and metabolites. We use domain knowledge, e.g., the Gene Ontology, to guide analysis of such data. By focusing on domain-aggregated results at, say the molecular function level, increased interpretability is available to biological scientists beyond what is possible if results are presented at the gene level. We use a 'top-down' approach to perform domain aggregation by first combining gene expressions before testing for differentially expressed patterns. This is in contrast to the more standard 'bottom-up' approach where genes are first tested individually then aggregated by domain knowledge. The benefits are greater sensitivity for detecting signals. In DEA procedure, the first scores from the PLS procedure are used to test for differentially expressed patterns using the t test. We find the general t test inadequate for adjusting for the number of genes within each GO term. New tests are proposed by finding the true null distribution of each PLS score adjusted for the size of the GO term. Our method is assessed using a series of simulation studies. Furthermore, we also discuss the impact of our testing procedure with different coding of our classification response variable, namely 0⁄1 or -1⁄1 for data with two classes. Advisors/Committee Members: Geoff Benson, Committee Member (advisor), Jack Alan Menius, Committee Member (advisor), Jacqueline M. Hughes-Oliver, Committee Chair (advisor), Jason Osborne, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Sidney Stanley Young, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Gene Ontology; Microarray

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, J. (2008). Domain Enhanced Analysis of Microarray Data Using GO Annotations. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5402

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Jiajun. “Domain Enhanced Analysis of Microarray Data Using GO Annotations.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed February 24, 2021. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5402.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Jiajun. “Domain Enhanced Analysis of Microarray Data Using GO Annotations.” 2008. Web. 24 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Liu J. Domain Enhanced Analysis of Microarray Data Using GO Annotations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2008. [cited 2021 Feb 24]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5402.

Council of Science Editors:

Liu J. Domain Enhanced Analysis of Microarray Data Using GO Annotations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2008. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5402

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