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You searched for +publisher:"North Carolina State University" +contributor:("Dr. Nancy Monteiro-Riviere, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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North Carolina State University

1. Pierson, Bonnie Elizabeth. Characterization and Evaluation of a Novel Nanoporous Gold Biosensor Substrate.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Engineering, 2009, North Carolina State University

Dilute but powerful biological markers, such as hormones in blood stream, are potent but difficult to detect quickly and accurately using current biosensor technologies. Nanoporous structures offer greatly increased surface area which can be functionalized for use as a biosensor, amplifying throughput and the enhancing the ability to detect small concentrations. With the option for diverse component materials and conformations, a sensor with prescribed properties could be easily incorporated into devices for clinical diagnosis or research applications. This study evaluates the suitability of a nanoporous gold (NPG) wire for use as a biosensing component as a proof of concept through the detailed characterization of the porosity, structural support, and electrical properties of the wires. The nanoporous gold wires were created using electrochemical etching equipment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to image and evaluate the pores and effectiveness of the etching procedure. Pores were found to be 9.86 ± 4.92 µm in diameter with a density of 880 pores/µm2 and only 5% silver remained following etching procedures. The storage capacity of the nanoporous wire annealed to a gold support structure at 15.6 mF/cm, was found to be higher than that of unsupported wires at 10.6 mF/cm. Structurally supported NPG wires also demonstrated a lower resistance (4.2Ω compared to 13.4Ω) owing to the capacitance of the nonporous gold support structure at high frequencies. Wires annealed to a gold support structure demonstrated greater mechanical stability and generally more consistent electrical properties. Samples were found highly susceptible to fracture and any coatings vulnerable to denaturing with extensive transport, handling, and testing. Some cross-contamination of samples was detected. Most contamination effects were minimal and confined to materials used in the manufacturing process. Future investigation should include other support structure conformations, functionalizing samples, and performing biocompatibility testing. NPG wires demonstrate potential for environmental applications and as medical device component, but have not yet been evaluated for direct-contact in vivo applications. The brittleness of the material necessitates that it be used in conjunction with other support structures; however the material provides interesting electrical properties, a good base for the adhesion of biomolecules, and a thorough porosity. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Albert Banes, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. Roger Narayan, Committee Chair (advisor), Dr. Nancy Monteiro-Riviere, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: biosensor; nanoporous gold

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pierson, B. E. (2009). Characterization and Evaluation of a Novel Nanoporous Gold Biosensor Substrate. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1977

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pierson, Bonnie Elizabeth. “Characterization and Evaluation of a Novel Nanoporous Gold Biosensor Substrate.” 2009. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1977.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pierson, Bonnie Elizabeth. “Characterization and Evaluation of a Novel Nanoporous Gold Biosensor Substrate.” 2009. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Pierson BE. Characterization and Evaluation of a Novel Nanoporous Gold Biosensor Substrate. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2009. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1977.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pierson BE. Characterization and Evaluation of a Novel Nanoporous Gold Biosensor Substrate. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2009. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1977

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North Carolina State University

2. Barcio, Sarah. Thermally Responsive Surfaces for Tissue Engineering and Apparel Applications.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Engineering, 2006, North Carolina State University

Thermally responsive surfaces were created by grafting poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) onto polyester (PET) film and fabric using atmospheric pressure plasma treatment, which provided a quick, simple means of grafting that sufficiently sterilized the samples for cell culture. Grafting was achieved by a two-step process of surface activation with atmospheric pressure plasma followed by exposure of the substrate to a monomer solution in the presence of atmospheric pressure plasma. The plasma exposure time and monomer solution volume were optimized using cell culture studies. The graft was characterized by surface analysis techniques and cell culture studies. Contact angle measurements at different temperatures verified the thermally responsive nature of the graft on the PET film and fabric. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to examine the surface topography and the effects of an aqueous environment on the surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also used to examine the surface of the films and fabrics and to confirm the presence of the pNIPAM. AFM images showed the surface become significantly rougher and more variable when placed in water as the polymer chains became hydrated and a gel structure formed. The decrease in surface roughness seen with the grafted film and the SEM images confirm the graft coating the untreated film. The graft thickness on the PET film was found to be between 30 and 100 nm with AFM measurements. An acid dye test verified the presence of the graft on the filtration fabric. Cell culture studies were completed using human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs), human lung fibroblasts (HFLs), and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep G2) cells to demonstrate thermally modulated cellular adhesion, growth and detachment on the films and fabrics. Viable cell sheets were successfully released from atmospheric plasma grafted pNIPAM on polyester film. Although no detachment was achieved with the grafted PET fabric, the treated fabrics could potentially be useful for tissue engineering scaffolds in bioreactors or for large-scale cell sheet engineering. Thermally responsive textiles were created using coat- and spray-grafting of pNIPAM onto woven cotton, nylon, and polyester with atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to examine the surface chemistry and confirm the presence and washfastness of the grafts produced from the two methods. Vertical wicking tests showed an increase in wettability with increasing temperature. Coat-grafted fabrics had the greatest resistance to wicking, and spray-grafted fabrics had the greatest wicking. An acid dye test also confirmed the presence of the graft showing the greatest uniformity and washfastness from the coat-grafting method. Once fully characterized, these fabrics could be used as responsive textiles for apparel applications. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Nancy Monteiro-Riviere, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. Marian McCord, Committee Chair (advisor), Dr. Mohamed Bourham, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: biomaterials; smart polymers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barcio, S. (2006). Thermally Responsive Surfaces for Tissue Engineering and Apparel Applications. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2664

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barcio, Sarah. “Thermally Responsive Surfaces for Tissue Engineering and Apparel Applications.” 2006. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2664.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barcio, Sarah. “Thermally Responsive Surfaces for Tissue Engineering and Apparel Applications.” 2006. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Barcio S. Thermally Responsive Surfaces for Tissue Engineering and Apparel Applications. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2006. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2664.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Barcio S. Thermally Responsive Surfaces for Tissue Engineering and Apparel Applications. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2006. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2664

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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