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You searched for +publisher:"North Carolina State University" +contributor:("Dr. Elizabeth G. Loboa, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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North Carolina State University

1. Marvel, Skylar. The Importance of Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Parameters for Functional Bone Tissue Engineering using Adult Stem Cells.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Engineering, 2009, North Carolina State University

Functional bone tissue engineering is a very important emerging interdisciplinary field of research. The treatments of bone loss, defects, trauma and disease often require replacement bone tissue or the use of bone substitutes. Functional bone tissue engineering attempts to create this needed replacement bone tissue using a patient’s stem cells. One small aspect of this field involves being able to control the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of a patient’s stem cells with the eventual goal of creating an autologous bone graft in vitro to correct bone defects. Two possible types of stem cells for this procedure are human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human adipose derived adult stem cells (hASCs), both of which have been shown to be capable of osteogenic differentiation. Many different stimuli are being actively researched to control this differentiation, such as fluid shear stress, tensile strain, electric fields, chemical signals and material properties of substrates to name a few. One newly investigated stimulus is low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). Since the mid 1990s LIPUS has been used clinically to aid fracture healing and since 2000 has also been prescribed for the treatment of non-unions. Although the mechanisms have not been elucidated, LIPUS has been shown to increase expression of cellular osteogenic markers in vitro. However, the parameters of LIPUS have not been optimized for increasing osteogenic differentiation and the use of LIPUS has been untested on hASCs, both of which could potentially benefit the field of bone tissue engineering and are the focus of this body of work. To explore the optimization of LIPUS parameters a custom ultrasound system was designed and built to give precise control over an extensive range of values for each stimulus parameter. There were several design criteria which included making the system automatable, insuring that the system can be used with standard incubators, and reducing the amount of laboratory space required to house the system. Once built, the ultrasound system was validated by testing three different pulse repetition frequency (PRF) parameter settings for inducing osteogenic differentiation of both hMSCs and hASCs. The first set of experiments investigated effects on hASCs and showed a significant increase in calcium accretion per cell with both 1 kHz and 100 Hz PRFs; however, this result was diminished by noting that the significant differences came from variations in amounts of DNA rather than increases in calcium. The effect caused by the presence of papain digest in experimental samples on the quantification of DNA was then studied and a change in the protocol for the DNA quantification assay was made. Using the modified assay a second set of experiments investigated the effects of LIPUS on hMSCs, and although the results were not significant, there was a trend of increased calcium accretion per cell with higher PRFs indicating that, of the three PRF settings tested, the 1 kHz PRF… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Greg S. McCarty, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. Paul A. Dayton, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Dr. Elizabeth G. Loboa, Committee Chair (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: pulse repetition frequency; adipose derived adult stem cells

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Marvel, S. (2009). The Importance of Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Parameters for Functional Bone Tissue Engineering using Adult Stem Cells. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2793

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marvel, Skylar. “The Importance of Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Parameters for Functional Bone Tissue Engineering using Adult Stem Cells.” 2009. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed July 15, 2020. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2793.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marvel, Skylar. “The Importance of Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Parameters for Functional Bone Tissue Engineering using Adult Stem Cells.” 2009. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Marvel S. The Importance of Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Parameters for Functional Bone Tissue Engineering using Adult Stem Cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2793.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Marvel S. The Importance of Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Parameters for Functional Bone Tissue Engineering using Adult Stem Cells. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2009. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2793

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North Carolina State University

2. Hanson, Ariel Dawn. Adhesion and mechanobiology methods to proliferate and osteogenically differentiate adipose-derived adult stem cells.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Engineering, 2007, North Carolina State University

Subjects/Keywords: adult stem cells; mesenchymal stem cells; differentiation; tissue engineering; mechanical loading; biomaterials; scaffold

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hanson, A. D. (2007). Adhesion and mechanobiology methods to proliferate and osteogenically differentiate adipose-derived adult stem cells. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2690

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hanson, Ariel Dawn. “Adhesion and mechanobiology methods to proliferate and osteogenically differentiate adipose-derived adult stem cells.” 2007. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed July 15, 2020. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2690.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hanson, Ariel Dawn. “Adhesion and mechanobiology methods to proliferate and osteogenically differentiate adipose-derived adult stem cells.” 2007. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Hanson AD. Adhesion and mechanobiology methods to proliferate and osteogenically differentiate adipose-derived adult stem cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2007. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2690.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hanson AD. Adhesion and mechanobiology methods to proliferate and osteogenically differentiate adipose-derived adult stem cells. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2007. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2690

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North Carolina State University

3. Haslauer, Carla. Design and Validation of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications Using Human Adipose-Derived Adult Stem Cells.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2009, North Carolina State University

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haslauer, C. (2009). Design and Validation of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications Using Human Adipose-Derived Adult Stem Cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6945

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haslauer, Carla. “Design and Validation of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications Using Human Adipose-Derived Adult Stem Cells.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed July 15, 2020. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6945.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haslauer, Carla. “Design and Validation of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications Using Human Adipose-Derived Adult Stem Cells.” 2009. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Haslauer C. Design and Validation of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications Using Human Adipose-Derived Adult Stem Cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6945.

Council of Science Editors:

Haslauer C. Design and Validation of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications Using Human Adipose-Derived Adult Stem Cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2009. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6945

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