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You searched for +publisher:"North Carolina State University" +contributor:("Dr. Ed Gehringer, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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North Carolina State University

1. Sarkar, Abhik. Design and Analysis of Lock-free Data Structures.

Degree: MS, Computer Engineering, 2007, North Carolina State University

The advent of multi-processor systems has motivated programmers to develop multi-threaded and multi-process applications on shared memory data structures. In these applications, multiple processes read and update shared data structure concurrently, which may lead to race conditions resulting in incoherent memory. To ensure exclusivity of access to this shared memory, programmers have been using locks. Lock-based concurrency is a pessimistic approach that assumes conflicts among concurrent processes to occur frequently.However, if few conflicts occur, lock-based concurrency unnecessarily reduce concurrency. One solution to improve concurrency, is to allow non-conflicting processes to execute in parallel. This can be gained by using fine locks, but programming with them is complex and error-prone. Consequently, researchers have devised an optimistic concurrency mechanism known as lock-free algorithms. Various lock-free libraries have been developed that are either data structure specific or universal constructs. However, these lock-free libraries have been restricted to simple data structures that do not meet the requirements of a real-world application. This work focuses on implementing a lock-free data structure suitable for a real-world application. The suitability of various implementations is analyzed. Design choices are made based upon the requirements and the suitability of lock-free implementations to the specific application considered. Finally, the performance of the lock-free implementation versus lock-based implementation are compared. Along with it, certain insights related to reduced complexity of the implementation and atomicity of lock-free implementation that make it robust are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Yan Solihin, Committee Chair (advisor), Dr. Suleyman Sair, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. Ed Gehringer, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Lock-Free; Data Structures; Multi-processors

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sarkar, A. (2007). Design and Analysis of Lock-free Data Structures. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/385

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sarkar, Abhik. “Design and Analysis of Lock-free Data Structures.” 2007. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/385.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sarkar, Abhik. “Design and Analysis of Lock-free Data Structures.” 2007. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Sarkar A. Design and Analysis of Lock-free Data Structures. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2007. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/385.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sarkar A. Design and Analysis of Lock-free Data Structures. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2007. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/385

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North Carolina State University

2. Eker, Abdulaziz. Characterization of Context Switch Effects on L2 Cache.

Degree: MS, Computer Engineering, 2007, North Carolina State University

Multitasking is common in most systems. In order to use the processor resources efficiently, a multitasking system schedules processes to run for certain intervals by switching (saving and restoring) their contexts. However, since processes bring their own data to the cache when they are running, context switching causes each process to suffer from more misses. Behavior of L2 cache misses due to context switches with different cache configurations, working-set sizes, and process priorities is not well-understood. Analysis of this behavior will give insights about the reasons and ways to mitigate these misses. The first contribution of this paper is the characterization of the context switch effect on L2 cache relating to the process priorities. The paper also characterizes the context switch effect with various cache configurations, including the size and associativity of the cache. Finally, it defines two types of misses that occur due to context switches.Replacement context switch misses occur when a process' working set is replaced by an interfering process. Reorder context switch misses occur due to reordering of lines by an interfering process, i.e. moving lines from more recently used to less recently used position. Based on the characterization results, we found that the number of context switch misses increases with lower priorities. On average, a process with the lowest priority suffers 15.4 times more L2 cache misses due to the context switch effect than the case there is no time-sharing, while the process with the highest priority suffers only 1.2 times more misses. We also observed that the impact of context switch is affected more by the priority of the process itself, rather than the priority of the interfering process. We also found that increase in associativity increases reorder context switch misses. Finally, the highest number of context switch misses occur when the size of a process' working set is close to the cache size. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Yan Solihin, Committee Chair (advisor), Dr. Suleyman Sair, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. Ed Gehringer, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Cache memories; context switch; multiprogramming; scheduling priority

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Eker, A. (2007). Characterization of Context Switch Effects on L2 Cache. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1250

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eker, Abdulaziz. “Characterization of Context Switch Effects on L2 Cache.” 2007. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1250.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eker, Abdulaziz. “Characterization of Context Switch Effects on L2 Cache.” 2007. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Eker A. Characterization of Context Switch Effects on L2 Cache. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2007. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1250.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Eker A. Characterization of Context Switch Effects on L2 Cache. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2007. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1250

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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