Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"North Carolina State University" +contributor:("Christine Grant, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


North Carolina State University

1. Ponder, Celia Steward. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Medical Textiles and Their Role in Prevention of Nosocomial Infections.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2009, North Carolina State University

Biocidal finishes grafted onto medical textiles are a potential technology to reduce nosocomial infection transmission. But is the application and use of biocidal finishes worth the environmental cost? Life cycle inventories (LCI) are a tool to show the resources used and emissions generated over the life cycle of a product. In this research, life cycle inventories are utilized in the design of a reusable medical garment with a biocidal finish to: assess options for the biocidal chemical, compare the reusable garment with a disposable garment, and assess the use of a biocidal finish in a hospital setting. The cradle-to-gate life cycle inventories of two biocidal halamines – 3-allyl-5,5-dimethyl hydantoin (ADMH) and dimethylol-5,5-dimethyl hydantoin (DMDMH) – are compared to allow the manufacturer to select the chemical that consumes less energy and raw materials and generates fewer emissions. The reusable garment is then compared with a disposable gown of similar use to determine, cradle-to-use, which has the better environmental performance. Life cycle inventory analysis is also used to determine the resources and emissions saved by the hypothetical use of a biocidal patient gown and the subsequent reduction in nosocomial infections. This is a novel area for LCI, as no LCI has been studied for treating an infection previously. When a patient contracts an infection while in the hospital, additional materials are used to test the patient, to provide contact isolation, and to treat the patient. Inventories were analyzed for each phase of this treatment using MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) as the nosocomial infection contracted and treated. In this research study, the drug therapy consists of vancomycin hydrochloride. While previous life cycle inventory studies have determined that solvent usage is the largest user of resources for pharmaceutical production, the current study shows that fermentation is actually the largest consumer of raw materials and energy in the cradle-to-gate (CTG) manufacture of vancomycin hydrochloride. Of the phases in infection treatment studied, contact isolation utilizes the most raw material and energy resources and generates the most emissions due to the use of disposable gowns and gloves. Finally, the LCI for treating an infection was compared with the LCI for using the biocidal finish. If the usage of the biocidal patient gown reduces the nosocomial infection rate more than 2%, the resulting reduction in raw material consumption, energy consumption, and emissions generated is enough to overcome that of using a biocidal garment. In addition, the impact of dyeing processes on the cradle-to-gate inventory of a textile product is investigated using carpet as a case study. Using a life cycle approach, gate-to-gate inventories for five nylon coloring processes are performed and compared to the cradle-to-gate life cycle inventory of the carpet. This analysis shows that dyeing can be a large contributor to the carpet cradle-to-gate energy usage. Advisors/Committee Members: Jan Genzer, Committee Member (advisor), Marian McCord, Committee Member (advisor), Stephen Michielsen, Committee Member (advisor), Christine Grant, Committee Chair (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: life cycle inventory; energy; medical textiles

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ponder, C. S. (2009). Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Medical Textiles and Their Role in Prevention of Nosocomial Infections. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4715

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ponder, Celia Steward. “Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Medical Textiles and Their Role in Prevention of Nosocomial Infections.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed May 07, 2021. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4715.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ponder, Celia Steward. “Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Medical Textiles and Their Role in Prevention of Nosocomial Infections.” 2009. Web. 07 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Ponder CS. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Medical Textiles and Their Role in Prevention of Nosocomial Infections. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2009. [cited 2021 May 07]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4715.

Council of Science Editors:

Ponder CS. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Medical Textiles and Their Role in Prevention of Nosocomial Infections. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2009. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4715


North Carolina State University

2. Hussain, Yazan Ahed. Stiction Reduction Agents Studies Using QCM.

Degree: MS, Chemical Engineering, 2003, North Carolina State University

The problem of stiction in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is highly limiting their fabrication and functionality. The problem occurs during the fabrication, release stiction, as well as during the use of the devices, in-use stiction. Anti-stiction agents are currently an active area of research in the MEMS field to address this issue. These agents are primarily deposited in the form of self-assembled monolayers (SAM's) on the substrate to change its surface properties; to reduce what is known as the stiction problem. One commonly used SAM is the octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). On silicon substrates, the most used material in MEMS fabrication, OTS has shown high effectiveness in reducing devices stiction. The use of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as an analytical technique for studying the OTS anti-stiction agent is presented in this work. Using the QCM as the primary analytical tool, we were able to extract comprehensive information about the formed SAM. The dependence of SAM deposition on the bulk phase concentration of the deposit solution is shown. A rough estimation of the adsorption kinetics' rate constants were calculated, and the equilibrium constant was determined from their values. The equilibrium constant shows the high favorability of OTS deposition on silicon substrate compared to the reverse desorption process. The complex nature of the OTS SAM and its formation mechanism were also shown. These conclusions were made based upon comparison between the more robust SAM system of thiols on gold and the OTS on silicon. Finally, the interaction between the OTS and a vapor-phase lubricant (tertiary-butyl phenyl phosphate, TBPP), for friction reduction, was studied. Preliminary QCM results show a change in the adsorption of lubricant on bare silicon compared to OTS coated silicon. In addition, the lubricant film is believed to have higher slippage when OTS was present as an underlayer. Advisors/Committee Members: Jacqueline Krim, Committee Member (advisor), Christine Grant, Committee Chair (advisor), Saad Khan, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: MEMS; QCM; OTS; SAM; stiction

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hussain, Y. A. (2003). Stiction Reduction Agents Studies Using QCM. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/750

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hussain, Yazan Ahed. “Stiction Reduction Agents Studies Using QCM.” 2003. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed May 07, 2021. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/750.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hussain, Yazan Ahed. “Stiction Reduction Agents Studies Using QCM.” 2003. Web. 07 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Hussain YA. Stiction Reduction Agents Studies Using QCM. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2003. [cited 2021 May 07]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/750.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hussain YA. Stiction Reduction Agents Studies Using QCM. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2003. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/750

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North Carolina State University

3. Hussain, Yazan Ahed. Supercritical CO2 Aided Processing of Thin Polymer Films Studied Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2006, North Carolina State University

Fundamental and applied aspects of the interactions between carbon dioxide (CO₂) and different polymer systems were investigated to demonstrate the effect and performance of CO₂ during polymer processing. From a fundamental perspective, the sorption of CO₂ into a non-soluble polymer and its dependence on the different system variables were examined. Another fundamental study investigated the dissolution of a fluorinated polymer in CO₂ at different conditions. Finally, the application of supercritical CO₂ for the impregnation of additives into two different polymers was evaluated. In all these studies, the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was used as the primary analytical technique. In the first part of this work, the sorption of CO₂ into poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, was investigated. The effect of several parameters, including pressure, temperature, film thickness, and polymer state, on the equilibrium and kinetics of the sorption process was studied. The uptake isotherms of CO₂ into PMMA were estimated from the QCM frequency change. This uptake was found to decrease with temperature and to depend on the film thickness. The presence of hysteresis in the sorption-desorpotion isotherms clearly marked the glass transition which was found to be in good agreement with previously reported values. This glass transition also affected the sorption kinetic. In the glassy state, two-stage sorption curves were observed, whereas in the rubbery stage, Fickian diffusion was evident. The results from this study were utilized to examine the reliability of Sauerbrey equation for mass calculation. By measuring the change in QCM resistance, it was found that both the thickness and the amount of CO₂ dissolved in the polymer can affect the QCM response. However, it was demonstrated that Sauerbrey equation was still applicable for films up to ˜1 μm thick. In the next part, the dissolution of poly(dihydroperfluorooctyl methacrylate-r-tetrahydropyranyl methacrylate); PFOMA, a copolymer was studied. The dissolution process consisted of two stages: CO₂ sorption and polymer dissolution. The measured frequency was utilized to determine mass changes for both processes. In the sorption stage, the solubility of CO₂ into PFOMA was measured at different temperatures and pressures. The solubility was found to depend on both the CO₂ density and the temperature. Polymer dissolution started at pressures between 1100 and 1600 psi, depending on the temperature. The dissolution rate was found to increase as the CO₂ density increases, but has a possible dependence on the temperature. Finally, the fraction of undissolved polymer after 1 hour of CO₂ exposure was estimated. This fraction increased linearly from 20 to more than 90% with CO₂ density. The last part in this work examined the impregnation of ibuprofen (IBU) into two biocompatible polymers: PMMA and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP. For PMMA, the amount of impregnated IBU decreased as the CO₂ density increased. The solubility parameter approach provided a possible explanation for this behavior… Advisors/Committee Members: Christine Grant, Committee Chair (advisor), Ruben Carbonell, Committee Member (advisor), Saad Khan, Committee Member (advisor), Richard Spontak, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sorption in polymer; Polymer dissolution; Supercritical fluids; Carbon dioxide; QCM; CO<; sub>; 2<; /sub>;

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hussain, Y. A. (2006). Supercritical CO2 Aided Processing of Thin Polymer Films Studied Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3450

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hussain, Yazan Ahed. “Supercritical CO2 Aided Processing of Thin Polymer Films Studied Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed May 07, 2021. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3450.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hussain, Yazan Ahed. “Supercritical CO2 Aided Processing of Thin Polymer Films Studied Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance.” 2006. Web. 07 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Hussain YA. Supercritical CO2 Aided Processing of Thin Polymer Films Studied Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2006. [cited 2021 May 07]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3450.

Council of Science Editors:

Hussain YA. Supercritical CO2 Aided Processing of Thin Polymer Films Studied Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2006. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3450

.