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You searched for +publisher:"North Carolina State University" +contributor:("Brian T. Denton, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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North Carolina State University

1. Moomaw, Lindsay M. Stochastic Modeling for Optimal Batch Scheduling of Prophylactic Dispensing Centers.

Degree: MS, Industrial Engineering, 2010, North Carolina State University

We study stochastic optimization models for scheduling batch arrivals to a Point of Dispensing (POD) in response to a biological emergency in which mass vaccination or dispensing of antiviral medication is implemented. The objective of our model is to minimize the total expected waiting time for customers and idle time of servers while considering the stochasticity of service times and customer flow through the POD. We begin with a simplified design of a POD which includes three function-defined servers and the basic queuing elements that would be utilized in a realistic POD, including splitting and merging queues. We create two-stage stochastic programming formulations to model two cases. In the first case of splitting queues, numerical results suggest an optimal constant batch interarrival time can produce total expected waiting and idle time costs near those of the optimal solution to the stochastic program. Stochastic programming formulations for the second case of split and merged queues prove to be more difficult. We study information and integer relaxations which provide approximations that are easier to solve. However, our results indicate relatively wide gaps on the optimal solution value. We expand the POD design to include eight stations to better represent a realistic facility. Using discrete event simulation, we test two batch interarrival time heuristics and report the similarity in their best solutions with respect to lowest expected costs of waiting and total operating time. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Brian T. Denton, Committee Chair (advisor), Dr. Julie S. Ivy, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. Yahya Fathi, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: stochastic programming; simulation; emergency response; pandemic influenza; point of dispensing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moomaw, L. M. (2010). Stochastic Modeling for Optimal Batch Scheduling of Prophylactic Dispensing Centers. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6270

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moomaw, Lindsay M. “Stochastic Modeling for Optimal Batch Scheduling of Prophylactic Dispensing Centers.” 2010. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed January 23, 2020. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6270.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moomaw, Lindsay M. “Stochastic Modeling for Optimal Batch Scheduling of Prophylactic Dispensing Centers.” 2010. Web. 23 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Moomaw LM. Stochastic Modeling for Optimal Batch Scheduling of Prophylactic Dispensing Centers. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 23]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6270.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Moomaw LM. Stochastic Modeling for Optimal Batch Scheduling of Prophylactic Dispensing Centers. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2010. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6270

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Mason, Jennifer Elizabeth. Optimal Timing of Statin Initiation for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

Degree: MS, Operations Research, 2009, North Carolina State University

HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (statins) are an important part of the treatment plan for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the optimal time to initiate treatment is influenced by many factors. We investigate two such factors in this thesis: (1) the patient's long-term adherence to treatment and (2) the decision maker's criteria for optimal treatment initiation. Many patients who are prescribed statins stop taking the drug altogether or take less than the prescribed amount within the first year. This imperfect adherence can lessen the drug's benefit. We propose a Markov decision process model to optimize the treatment decision for hypercholesterolemia for patients with type 2 diabetes while considering issues of adherence to statins. Our model incorporates a discrete time Markov process for adherence states of the patient. We found that in the long run approximately 25% of patients remain highly adherent, taking 80 to 100% of their medication. We also find that patients with imperfect adherence should start statins 5 to 7 years later than their perfectly adherent counterparts. Although adherence levels greatly affect the optimal start time for statins. We found that starting statins later in life did not significantly increase the expected quality adjusted life years for patients with imperfect adherence. We conclude that it is more important for patients to improve their adherence than to adjust the timing of initiation to help compensate for imperfect adherence. We also consider three different decision making criteria with our model: society, patient, and third-party payer. Decision makers with these different perspectives have different objectives in mind. The patient is concerned with his or her quality of life, the third-party payer is concerned with minimizing costs, and society is concerned with maximizing rewards minus costs. These decision maker objectives are reflected in different reward functions in our MDP model. We find that it is optimal for patients to initiate statins early in the decision horizon under the patient perspective while the earliest optimal start times under the society and third-party payer perspectives are generally 4 and 15 years later, respectively. Finally, we formulate an inverse optimization model to estimate the implied societal willingness to pay. We use our MDP model and U.S. guidelines for initiating statins to estimate the implied reward for a year of quality life. Our estimates indicate a societal willingness to pay of between 120,000 and 160,000 per quality adjusted life year. Advisors/Committee Members: Salah E. Elmaghraby, Committee Member (advisor), Julie S. Ivy, Committee Member (advisor), Brian T. Denton, Committee Chair (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: statins; Markov decision process; inverse optimization; perspectives; diabetes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mason, J. E. (2009). Optimal Timing of Statin Initiation for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1728

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mason, Jennifer Elizabeth. “Optimal Timing of Statin Initiation for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.” 2009. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed January 23, 2020. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1728.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mason, Jennifer Elizabeth. “Optimal Timing of Statin Initiation for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.” 2009. Web. 23 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Mason JE. Optimal Timing of Statin Initiation for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 23]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1728.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mason JE. Optimal Timing of Statin Initiation for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2009. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1728

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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